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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesLes Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SECOND - THE GREAT BOURGEOIS - Chapter VII. Rule: Receive No One except in the Evening
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Les Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SECOND - THE GREAT BOURGEOIS - Chapter VII. Rule: Receive No One except in the Evening Post by :euchre_jack Category :Long Stories Author :Victor Hugo Date :March 2011 Read :3643

Click below to download : Les Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SECOND - THE GREAT BOURGEOIS - Chapter VII. Rule: Receive No One except in the Evening (Format : PDF)

Les Miserables - Volume III - BOOK SECOND - THE GREAT BOURGEOIS - Chapter VII. Rule: Receive No One except in the Evening

Such was M. Luc-Esprit Gillenormand, who had not lost his hair,--
which was gray rather than white,--and which was always dressed in
"dog's ears." To sum up, he was venerable in spite of all this.

He had something of the eighteenth century about him; frivolous and great.

In 1814 and during the early years of the Restoration, M. Gillenormand,
who was still young,--he was only seventy-four,--lived in the
Faubourg Saint Germain, Rue Servandoni, near Saint-Sulpice.
He had only retired to the Marais when he quitted society,
long after attaining the age of eighty.

And, on abandoning society, he had immured himself in his habits.
The principal one, and that which was invariable, was to keep his
door absolutely closed during the day, and never to receive any one
whatever except in the evening. He dined at five o'clock, and after
that his door was open. That had been the fashion of his century,
and he would not swerve from it. "The day is vulgar," said he,
"and deserves only a closed shutter. Fashionable people only light up
their minds when the zenith lights up its stars." And he barricaded
himself against every one, even had it been the king himself.
This was the antiquated elegance of his day.

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We have just spoken of M. Gillenormand's two daughters. They hadcome into the world ten years apart. In their youth they hadborne very little resemblance to each other, either in characteror countenance, and had also been as little like sisters to eachother as possible. The youngest had a charming soul, which turnedtowards all that belongs to the light, was occupied with flowers,with verses, with music, which fluttered away into glorious space,enthusiastic, ethereal, and was wedded from her very youth, in ideal,to a vague and heroic figure. The elder had also her chimera;she espied in the azure some
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With M. Gillenormand, sorrow was converted into wrath; he was furiousat being in despair. He had all sorts of prejudices and tookall sorts of liberties. One of the facts of which his exteriorrelief and his internal satisfaction was composed, was, as we havejust hinted, that he had remained a brisk spark, and that he passedenergetically for such. This he called having "royal renown." This royal renown sometimes drew down upon him singular windfalls. One day, there was brought to him in a basket, as though it hadbeen a basket of oysters, a stout, newly born boy, who was
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