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A Footnote To History - Chapter XI. LAUPEPA AND MATAAFA A Footnote To History - Chapter XI. LAUPEPA AND MATAAFA

A Footnote To History - Chapter XI. LAUPEPA AND MATAAFA
1889-1892With the hurricane, the broken war-ships, and the stranded sailors, I am at an end of violence, and my tale flows henceforth among carpet incidents. The blue-jackets on Apia beach were still jealously held apart by sentries, when the powers at home were already seeking a peaceable solution. It was agreed, so far as might be, to obliterate two years of blundering; and to resume in 1889, and at Berlin, those negotiations which had been so unhappily broken off at Washington in 1887. The example thus offered by Germany is rare in history; in the career of Prince Bismarck, so far... Nonfictions - Post by : mattyk23 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1732

A Footnote To History - Chapter X. THE HURRICANE A Footnote To History - Chapter X. THE HURRICANE

A Footnote To History - Chapter X. THE HURRICANE
_March 1889The so-called harbour of Apia is formed in part by a recess of the coast- line at Matautu, in part by the slim peninsula of Mulinuu, and in part by the fresh waters of the Mulivai and Vaisingano. The barrier reef--that singular breakwater that makes so much of the circuit of Pacific islands--is carried far to sea at Matautu and Mulinuu; inside of these two horns it runs sharply landward, and between them it is burst or dissolved by the fresh water. The shape of the enclosed anchorage may be compared to a high-shouldered jar or bottle with a funnel... Nonfictions - Post by : John_Karnish - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1055

A Footnote To History - Chapter IX. 'FUROR CONSULARIS' A Footnote To History - Chapter IX. "FUROR CONSULARIS"

A Footnote To History - Chapter IX. 'FUROR CONSULARIS'
_December 1888 _to March 1889Knappe, in the _Adler_, with a flag of truce at the fore, was entering Laulii Bay when the _Eber brought him the news of the night's reverse. His heart was doubtless wrung for his young countrymen who had been butchered and mutilated in the dark woods, or now lay suffering, and some of them dying, on the ship. And he must have been startled as he recognised his own position. He had gone too far; he had stumbled into war, and, what was worse, into defeat; he had thrown away German lives for less than nothing, and... Nonfictions - Post by : goldensniper - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 961

A Footnote To History - Chapter VIII. AFFAIRS OF LAULII AND FANGALII A Footnote To History - Chapter VIII. AFFAIRS OF LAULII AND FANGALII

A Footnote To History - Chapter VIII. AFFAIRS OF LAULII AND FANGALII
_November-December 1888For Becker I have not been able to conceal my distaste, for he seems to me both false and foolish. But of his successor, the unfortunately famous Dr. Knappe, we may think as of a good enough fellow driven distraught. Fond of Samoa and the Samoans, he thought to bring peace and enjoy popularity among the islanders; of a genial, amiable, and sanguine temper, he made no doubt but he could repair the breach with the English consul. Hope told a flattering tale. He awoke to find himself exchanging defiances with de Coetlogon, beaten in the field by Mataafa, surrounded... Nonfictions - Post by : tcant - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2976

A Footnote To History - Chapter VII. THE SAMOAN CAMPS A Footnote To History - Chapter VII. THE SAMOAN CAMPS

A Footnote To History - Chapter VII. THE SAMOAN CAMPS
_November 1888When Brandeis and Tamasese fled by night from Mulinuu, they carried their wandering government some six miles to windward, to a position above Lotoanuu. For some three miles to the eastward of Apia, the shores of Upolu are low and the ground rises with a gentle acclivity, much of which waves with German plantations. A barrier reef encloses a lagoon passable for boats: and the traveller skims there, on smooth, many-tinted shallows, between the wall of the breakers on the one hand, and on the other a succession of palm-tree capes and cheerful beach-side villages. Beyond the great plantation of... Nonfictions - Post by : biz2000 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1657

A Footnote To History - Chapter VI. LAST EXPLOITS OF BECKER A Footnote To History - Chapter VI. LAST EXPLOITS OF BECKER

A Footnote To History - Chapter VI. LAST EXPLOITS OF BECKER
_September-November 1888Brandeis had held all day by Mulinuu, expecting the reported real attack. He woke on the 13th to find himself cut off on that unwatered promontory, and the Mataafa villagers parading Apia. The same day Fritze received a letter from Mataafa summoning him to withdraw his party from the isthmus; and Fritze, as if in answer, drew in his ship into the small harbour close to Mulinuu, and trained his port battery to assist in the defence. From a step so decisive, it might be thought the German plans were unaffected by the disastrous issue of the battle. I conceive... Nonfictions - Post by : brandyn - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2976

A Footnote To History - Chapter V. THE BATTLE OF MATAUTU A Footnote To History - Chapter V. THE BATTLE OF MATAUTU

A Footnote To History - Chapter V. THE BATTLE OF MATAUTU
_September 1888_The revolution had all the character of a popular movement. Many of the high chiefs were detained in Mulinuu; the commons trooped to the bush under inferior leaders. A camp was chosen near Faleula, threatening Mulinuu, well placed for the arrival of recruits and close to a German plantation from which the force could be subsisted. Manono came, all Tuamasanga, much of Savaii, and part of Aana, Tamasese's own government and titular seat. Both sides were arming. It was a brave day for the trader, though not so brave as some that followed, when a single cartridge is said to... Nonfictions - Post by : therd3 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1891

A Footnote To History - Chapter IV. BRANDEIS A Footnote To History - Chapter IV. BRANDEIS

A Footnote To History - Chapter IV. BRANDEIS
_September '87 to August '88_So Tamasese was on the throne, and Brandeis behind it; and I have now to deal with their brief and luckless reign. That it was the reign of Brandeis needs not to be argued: the policy is throughout that of an able, over-hasty white, with eyes and ideas. But it should be borne in mind that he had a double task, and must first lead his sovereign, before he could begin to drive their common subjects. Meanwhile, he himself was exposed (if all tales be true) to much dictation and interference, and to some "cumbrous aid," from... Nonfictions - Post by : kristyc - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2480

A Footnote To History - Chapter III. THE SORROWS OF LAUPEPA, 1883 TO 1887 A Footnote To History - Chapter III. THE SORROWS OF LAUPEPA, 1883 TO 1887

A Footnote To History - Chapter III. THE SORROWS OF LAUPEPA, 1883 TO 1887
You ride in a German plantation and see no bush, no soul stirring; only acres of empty sward, miles of cocoa-nut alley: a desert of food. In the eyes of the Samoan the place has the attraction of a park for the holiday schoolboy, of a granary for mice. We must add the yet more lively allurement of a haunted house, for over these empty and silent miles there broods the fear of the negrito cannibal. For the Samoan besides, there is something barbaric, unhandsome, and absurd in the idea of thus growing food only to send it from the land... Nonfictions - Post by : mbriceno - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2165

A Footnote To History - Chapter II. THE ELEMENTS OF DISCORD: FOREIGN A Footnote To History - Chapter II. THE ELEMENTS OF DISCORD: FOREIGN

A Footnote To History - Chapter II. THE ELEMENTS OF DISCORD: FOREIGN
The huge majority of Samoans, like other God-fearing folk in other countries, are perfectly content with their own manners. And upon one condition, it is plain they might enjoy themselves far beyond the average of man. Seated in islands very rich in food, the idleness of the many idle would scarce matter; and the provinces might continue to bestow their names among rival pretenders, and fall into war and enjoy that a while, and drop into peace and enjoy that, in a manner highly to be envied. But the condition--that they should be let alone--is now no longer possible. More than... Nonfictions - Post by : Craig - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2196

A Footnote To History - Chapter I. THE ELEMENTS OF DISCORD: NATIVE A Footnote To History - Chapter I. THE ELEMENTS OF DISCORD: NATIVE

A Footnote To History - Chapter I. THE ELEMENTS OF DISCORD: NATIVE
The story I have to tell is still going on as I write; the characters are alive and active; it is a piece of contemporary history in the most exact sense. And yet, for all its actuality and the part played in it by mails and telegraphs and iron war-ships, the ideas and the manners of the native actors date back before the Roman Empire. They are Christians, church-goers, singers of hymns at family worship, hardy cricketers; their books are printed in London by Spottiswoode, Trubner, or the Tract Society; but in most other points they are the contemporaries of our... Nonfictions - Post by : LilySparrow - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 861

A Footnote To History - PREFACE A Footnote To History - PREFACE

A Footnote To History - PREFACE
An affair which might be deemed worthy of a note of a few lines in any general history has been here expanded to the size of a volume or large pamphlet. The smallness of the scale, and the singularity of the manners and events and many of the characters, considered, it is hoped that, in spite of its outlandish subject, the sketch may find readers. It has been a task of difficulty. Speed was essential, or it might come too late to be of any service to a distracted country. Truth, in the midst of conflicting rumours and in the dearth... Nonfictions - Post by : Dedihb9 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1973

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT V - TABLEAU VIII. THE OPEN DOOR: SCENE I TO SCENE VII Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT V - TABLEAU VIII. THE OPEN DOOR: SCENE I TO SCENE VII

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT V - TABLEAU VIII. THE OPEN DOOR: SCENE I TO SCENE VII
The Stage represents the Deacon's room, as in Tableau I. Fire light. Stage dark. A pause. Then knocking at the door, C. Cries without of 'WILLIE!' 'MR. BRODIE!' The door is burst open.SCENE IDOCTOR, MARY, a MAIDSERVANT with lights.DOCTOR. The apartment is unoccupied.MARY. Dead, and he not here!DOCTOR. The bed has not been slept in. The counterpane is not turned down.MARY. It is not true; it cannot be true.DOCTOR. My dear young lady, you must have misunderstood your brother's language.MARY. O no; that I did not. That I am sure I did not.DOCTOR (LOOKING AT DOOR). The strange thing is .... Plays - Post by : questor - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2733

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT IV - TABLEAU VII. THE ROBBERY: SCENE I TO SCENE IV Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT IV - TABLEAU VII. THE ROBBERY: SCENE I TO SCENE IV

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT IV - TABLEAU VII. THE ROBBERY: SCENE I TO SCENE IV
The Stage represents the outside of the Excise Office in Chessel's Court. At the back, L.C., an archway opening on the High Street. The door of the Excise in wing, R.; the opposite side of the stage is lumbered with barrels, packing-cases, etc. Moonlight; the Excise Office casts a shadow over half the stage. A clock strikes the hour. A round of the City Guard, with halberts, lanterns, etc. enters and goes out again by the arch, after having examined the fastenings of the great door and the lumber on the left. Cry without in the High Street: 'Ten by the... Plays - Post by : punkin0801 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2151

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT III - TABLEAU VI. UNMASKED: SCENE I TO SCENE VII Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT III - TABLEAU VI. UNMASKED: SCENE I TO SCENE VII

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT III - TABLEAU VI. UNMASKED: SCENE I TO SCENE VII
The Stage represents a room in Leslie's house. A practicable window, C., through which a band of strong moonlight falls into the room. Near the window a strong-box. A practicable door in wing, L. Candlelight.SCENE ILESLIE, LAWSON, MARY, seated. BRODIE at back, walking between the windows and strong-box.LAWSON. Weel, weel, weel, weel, nae doubt.LESLIE. Mr. Lawson, I am perfectly satisfied with Brodie's word; I will wait gladly.LAWSON. I have nothing to say against that.BRODIE (BEHIND LAWSON). Nor for it.LAWSON. For it? for it, William? Ye're perfectly richt there. (TO LESLIE.) Just you do what William tells you; ye canna do better... Plays - Post by : stablesuk - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2797

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT III - TABLEAU V. KING'S EVIDENCE: SCENE I TO SCENE IV Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT III - TABLEAU V. KING'S EVIDENCE: SCENE I TO SCENE IV

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT III - TABLEAU V. KING'S EVIDENCE: SCENE I TO SCENE IV
The Stage represents a public place in Edinburgh.SCENE IJEAN, SMITH, AND MOORE(They loiter in L., and stand looking about as for somebody not there. SMITH is hat in hand to JEAN; MOORE as usual.)MOORE. Wot did I tell you? Is he 'ere, or ain't he? Now, then. Slink by name and Slink by nature, that's wot's the matter with him.JEAN. He'll no be lang; he's regular enough, if that was a'.MOORE. I'd regular him; I'd break his back.SMITH. Badger, you brute, you hang on to the lessons of your dancing-master. None but the genteel deserves the fair; does they, Duchess?MOORE. O... Plays - Post by : SOS_LTD - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3260

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT II - TABLEAU IV. EVIL AND GOOD: SCENE I TO SCENE X Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT II - TABLEAU IV. EVIL AND GOOD: SCENE I TO SCENE X

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT II - TABLEAU IV. EVIL AND GOOD: SCENE I TO SCENE X
The Stage represents the Deacon's workshop; benches, shavings, tools, boards, and so forth. Doors, C. on the street, and L. into the house. Without, church bells; not a chime, but a slow brokentocsin.SCENE IBRODIE (SOLUS). My head! my head! It's the sickness of the grave. And those bells go on . . . go on! . . . inexorable as death and judgment. (There they go; the trumpets of respectability, sounding encouragement to the world to do and spare not, and not to be found out. Found out! And to those who are they toll as when a man goes to... Plays - Post by : reneldy - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 814

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU III. MOTHER CLARKE'S: SCENE I TO SCENE III Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU III. MOTHER CLARKE'S: SCENE I TO SCENE III

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU III. MOTHER CLARKE'S: SCENE I TO SCENE III
SCENE IThe Stage represents a room of coarse and sordid appearance: settles, spittoons, etc.; sanded floor. A large table at back AINSLIE, HAMILTON, and others are playing cards and quarrelling. In front, L. and R. smaller tables, at one of which are BRODIE and MOORE, drinking. MRS. CLARKE and women serving.MOORE. You've got the devil's own luck, Deacon, that's what you've got.BRODIE. Luck! Don't talk of luck to a man like me! Why not say I've the devil's own judgment? Men of my stamp don't risk - they plan, Badger; they plan, and leave chance to such cattle as you... Plays - Post by : Maruli - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3306

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU II. HUNT THE RUNNER: SCENE I TO SCENE IV Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU II. HUNT THE RUNNER: SCENE I TO SCENE IV

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU II. HUNT THE RUNNER: SCENE I TO SCENE IV
THE SCENE REPRESENTS THE PROCURATOR'S OFFICE.SCENE ILAWSON, HUNT(LAWSON (ENTERING). Step your ways in, Officer. (AT WING.) Mr. Carfrae, give a chair to yon decent wife that cam' in wi' me. Nae news?A VOICE WITHOUT. Naething, sir.LAWSON (SITTING). Weel, Officer, and what can I do for you?)HUNT. Well, sir, as I was saying, I've an English warrant for the apprehension of one Jemmy Rivers, ALIAS Captain Starlight, now at large within your jurisdiction.LAWSON. That'll be the highwayman?HUNT. That same, Mr. Procurator-Fiscal. The Captain's given me a hard hunt of it this time. I dropped on his marks first at Huntingdon, but he... Plays - Post by : chinadoll - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3430

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU I. THE DOUBLE LIFE: SCENE I TO SCENE IX Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU I. THE DOUBLE LIFE: SCENE I TO SCENE IX

Deacon Brodie; Or The Double Life - ACT I - TABLEAU I. THE DOUBLE LIFE: SCENE I TO SCENE IX
The Stage represents a room in the Deacon's house, furnished partly as a sitting-, partly as a bed-room, in the style of an easy burgess of about 1780. C., a door; L. C., a second and smaller door; R. C., practicable window; L., alcove, supposed to contain bed; at the back, a clothes-press and a corner cupboard containing bottles, etc. MARY BRODIE at needlework; OLD BRODIE, a paralytic, in wheeled chair, at the fireside, L.To these LESLIE, C.LESLIE. May I come in, Mary?MARY. Why not?LESLIE. I scarce knew where to find you.MARY. The dad and I must have a corner, must... Plays - Post by : firstdrum - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 3348