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Records Of A Family Of Engineers - Chapter II. THE SERVICE OF THE NORTHERN LIGHTS Records Of A Family Of Engineers - Chapter II. THE SERVICE OF THE NORTHERN LIGHTS

Records Of A Family Of Engineers - Chapter II. THE SERVICE OF THE NORTHERN LIGHTS
IIt were hard to imagine a contrast more sharply defined than that between the lives of the men and women of this family: the one so chambered, so centred in the affections and the sensibilities; the other so active, healthy, and expeditious. From May to November, Thomas Smith and Robert Stevenson were on the mail, in the saddle, or at sea; and my grandfather, in particular, seems to have been possessed with a demon of activity in travel. In 1802, by direction of the Northern Lighthouse Board, he had visited the coast of England from St. Bees, in Cumberland, and round... Nonfictions - Post by : NNakamoto - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2077

Records Of A Family Of Engineers - Chapter I. DOMESTIC ANNALS Records Of A Family Of Engineers - Chapter I. DOMESTIC ANNALS

Records Of A Family Of Engineers - Chapter I. DOMESTIC ANNALS
It is believed that in 1665, James Stevenson in Nether Carsewell, parish of Neilston, county of Renfrew, and presumably a tenant farmer, married one Jean Keir; and in 1675, without doubt, there was born to these two a son Robert, possibly a maltster in Glasgow. In 1710, Robert married, for a second time, Elizabeth Cumming, and there was born to them, in 1720, another Robert, certainly a maltster in Glasgow. In 1742, Robert the second married Margaret Fulton (Margret, she called herself), by whom he had ten children, among whom were Hugh, born February 1749, and Alan, born June 1752.With these... Nonfictions - Post by : DaSylva - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1357

Records Of A Family Of Engineers - INTRODUCTION. THE SURNAME OF STEVENSON Records Of A Family Of Engineers - INTRODUCTION. THE SURNAME OF STEVENSON

Records Of A Family Of Engineers - INTRODUCTION. THE SURNAME OF STEVENSON
From the thirteenth century onwards, the name, under the various disguises of Stevinstoun, Stevensoun, Stevensonne, Stenesone, and Stewinsoune, spread across Scotland from the mouth of the Firth of Forth to the mouth of the Firth of Clyde. Four times at least it occurs as a place-name. There is a parish of Stevenston in Cunningham; a second place of the name in the Barony of Bothwell in Lanark; a third on Lyne, above Drochil Castle; the fourth on the Tyne, near Traprain Law. Stevenson of Stevenson (co. Lanark) swore fealty to Edward I in 1296, and the last of that family died... Nonfictions - Post by : huineng - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2618

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - APPENDIX Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - APPENDIX

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - APPENDIX
NOTE ON THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF FLEEMING JENKIN TO ELECTRICAL AND ENGINEERING SCIENCE. BY SIR WILLIAM THOMSON, F.R.S., LL D., ETC., ETC.IN the beginning of the year 1859 my former colleague (the first British University Professor of Engineering), Lewis Gordon, at that time deeply engaged in the then new work of cable making and cable laying, came to Glasgow to see apparatus for testing submarine cables and signalling through them, which I had been preparing for practical use on the first Atlantic cable, and which had actually done service upon it, during the six weeks of its successful working between Valencia and... Nonfictions - Post by : joweave - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2304

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter VII. 1875-1885 Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter VII. 1875-1885

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter VII. 1875-1885
Mr Jenkin's Illness - Captain Jenkin - The Golden Wedding - Death of Uncle John - Death of Mr. and Mrs. Austin - Illness and Death of the Captain - Death of Mrs. Jenkin - Effect on Fleeming - Telpherage - The End.AND now I must resume my narrative for that melancholy business that concludes all human histories. In January of the year 1875, while Fleeming's sky was still unclouded, he was reading Smiles. 'I read my engineers' lives steadily,' he writes, 'but find biographies depressing. I suspect one reason to be that misfortunes and trials can be graphically described, but... Nonfictions - Post by : rocketman - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 961

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter VI. 1869-1885 Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter VI. 1869-1885

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter VI. 1869-1885
Edinburgh - Colleagues - FARRAGO VITAE - I. The Family Circle - Fleeming and his Sons - Highland Life - The Cruise of the Steam Launch - Summer in Styria - Rustic Manners - II. The Drama - Private Theatricals - III. Sanitary Associations - The Phonograph - IV. Fleeming's Acquaintance with a Student - His late Maturity of Mind - Religion and Morality - His Love of Heroism - Taste in Literature - V. His Talk - His late Popularity - Letter from M. Trelat.THE remaining external incidents of Fleeming's life, pleasures, honours, fresh interests, new friends, are not such... Nonfictions - Post by : Bob_Bastian - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2256

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter V. NOTES OF TELEGRAPH VOYAGES, 1858 TO 1873 Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter V. NOTES OF TELEGRAPH VOYAGES, 1858 TO 1873

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter V. NOTES OF TELEGRAPH VOYAGES, 1858 TO 1873
BUT it is now time to see Jenkin at his life's work. I have before me certain imperfect series of letters written, as he says, 'at hazard, for one does not know at the time what is important and what is not': the earlier addressed to Miss Austin, after the betrothal; the later to Mrs. Jenkin the young wife. I should premise that I have allowed myself certain editorial freedoms, leaving out and splicing together much as he himself did with the Bona cable: thus edited the letters speak for themselves, and will fail to interest none who love adventure or... Nonfictions - Post by : amurdoch - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 846

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter IV. 1859-1868 Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter IV. 1859-1868

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter IV. 1859-1868
Fleeming's Marriage - His Married Life - Professional Difficulties - Life at Claygate - Illness of Mrs. F. Jenkin; and of Fleeming - Appointment to the Chair at Edinburgh.ON Saturday, Feb. 26, 1859, profiting by a holiday of four days, Fleeming was married to Miss Austin at Northiam: a place connected not only with his own family but with that of his bride as well. By Tuesday morning, he was at work again, fitting out cableships at Birkenhead. Of the walk from his lodgings to the works, I find a graphic sketch in one of his letters: 'Out over the railway... Nonfictions - Post by : eMerchant - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 820

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter III. 1851-1858 Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter III. 1851-1858

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter III. 1851-1858
Return to England - Fleeming at Fairbairn's - Experience in a Strike - Dr. Bell and Greek Architecture - The Gaskells - Fleeming at Greenwich - The Austins - Fleeming and the Austins - His Engagement - Fleeming and Sir W. Thomson.IN 1851, the year of Aunt Anna's death, the family left Genoa and came to Manchester Fleeming was entered in Fairbairn's works as an apprentice. From the palaces and Alps, the Mole, the blue Mediterranean, the humming lanes and the bright theatres of Genoa, he fell - and he was sharply conscious of the fall - to the dim... Nonfictions - Post by : okresource - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2498

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter II. 1833-1851 Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter II. 1833-1851

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter II. 1833-1851
Birth and Childhood - Edinburgh - Frankfort-on-the-Main - Paris - The Revolution of 1848 - The Insurrection - Flight to Italy - Sympathy with Italy - The Insurrection in Genoa - A Student in Genoa - The Lad and his Mother.HENRY CHARLES FLEEMING JENKIN (Fleeming, pronounced Flemming, to his friends and family) was born in a Government building on the coast of Kent, near Dungeness his father was serving at the time in the Coastguard, on March 25, 1833, and named after Admiral Fleeming, one of his father's protectors in the navy.His childhood was vagrant like his life. Once he... Nonfictions - Post by : ekcorp - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2662

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter I Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter I

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - Chapter I
The Jenkins of Stowting - Fleeming's grandfather - Mrs. Buckner's fortune - Fleeming's father; goes to sea; at St. Helena; meets King Tom; service in the West Indies; end of his career - The Campbell- Jacksons - Fleeming's mother - Fleeming's uncle John.IN the reign of Henry VIII., a family of the name of Jenkin, claiming to come from York, and bearing the arms of Jenkin ap Philip of St. Melans, are found reputably settled in the county of Kent. Persons of strong genealogical pinion pass from William Jenkin, Mayor of Folkestone in 1555, to his contemporary 'John Jenkin, of the... Nonfictions - Post by : phenz - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1047

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - PREFACE TO THE AMERICAN EDITION Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - PREFACE TO THE AMERICAN EDITION

Memoir Of Fleeming Jenkin - PREFACE TO THE AMERICAN EDITION
ON the death of Fleeming Jenkin, his family and friends determined to publish a selection of his various papers; by way of introduction, the following pages were drawn up; and the whole, forming two considerable volumes, has been issued in England. In the States, it has not been thought advisable to reproduce the whole; and the memoir appearing alone, shorn of that other matter which was at once its occasion and its justification, so large an account of a man so little known may seem to a stranger out of all proportion. But Jenkin was a man much more remarkable than... Nonfictions - Post by : drbedell - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1538

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter V. NIGHT IN THE BUSH The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter V. NIGHT IN THE BUSH

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter V. NIGHT IN THE BUSH
CHAPTER V. NIGHT IN THE BUSHWell, I was committed now; Tiapolo had to be smashed up before next day, and my hands were pretty full, not only with preparations, but with argument. My house was like a mechanics’ debating society: Uma was so made up that I shouldn’t go into the bush by night, or that, if I did, I was never to come back again. You know her style of arguing: you’ve had a specimen about Queen Victoria and the devil; and I leave you to fancy if I was tired of it before dark.At last I had a good... Long Stories - Post by : coastal99 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2379

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter IV. DEVIL-WORK The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter IV. DEVIL-WORK

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter IV. DEVIL-WORK
CHAPTER IV. DEVIL-WORKNear a month went by without much doing. The same night of our marriage Galoshes called round, and made himself mighty civil, and got into a habit of dropping in about dark and smoking his pipe with the family. He could talk to Uma, of course, and started to teach me native and French at the same time. He was a kind old buffer, though the dirtiest you would wish to see, and he muddled me up with foreign languages worse than the tower of Babel.That was one employment we had, and it made me feel less lonesome; but... Long Stories - Post by : wheels - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1086

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter III. THE MISSIONARY The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter III. THE MISSIONARY

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter III. THE MISSIONARY
CHAPTER III. THE MISSIONARYAs I came out on the verandah, the mission-boat was shooting for the mouth of the river. She was a long whale-boat painted white; a bit of an awning astern; a native pastor crouched on the wedge of the poop, steering; some four-and-twenty paddles flashing and dipping, true to the boat-song; and the missionary under the awning, in his white clothes, reading in a book, and set him up! It was pretty to see and hear; there’s no smarter sight in the islands than a missionary boat with a good crew and a good pipe to them; and... Long Stories - Post by : Marta - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1135

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter II. THE BAN The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter II. THE BAN

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter II. THE BAN
I came on the verandah just before the sun rose on the morrow. My house was the last on the east; there was a cape of woods and cliffs behind that hid the sunrise. To the west, a swift cold river ran down, and beyond was the green of the village, dotted with cocoa-palms and breadfruits and houses. The shutters were some of them down and some open; I saw the mosquito bars still stretched, with shadows of people new-awakened sitting up inside; and all over the green others were stalking silent, wrapped in their many-coloured sleeping clothes like Bedouins in... Long Stories - Post by : swinnie - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 661

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter I. A SOUTH SEA BRIDAL The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter I. A SOUTH SEA BRIDAL

The Beach Of Falesa - Chapter I. A SOUTH SEA BRIDAL
I saw that island first when it was neither night nor morning. The moon was to the west, setting, but still broad and bright. To the east, and right amidships of the dawn, which was all pink, the daystar sparkled like a diamond. The land breeze blew in our faces, and smelt strong of wild lime and vanilla: other things besides, but these were the most plain; and the chill of it set me sneezing. I should say I had been for years on a low island near the line, living for the most part solitary among natives. Here was a... Long Stories - Post by : bluesurf - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2899

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter IX. IN WHICH MR. NICHOLSON ACCEPTS THE PRINCIPLE OF AN ALLOWANCE The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter IX. IN WHICH MR. NICHOLSON ACCEPTS THE PRINCIPLE OF AN ALLOWANCE

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter IX. IN WHICH MR. NICHOLSON ACCEPTS THE PRINCIPLE OF AN ALLOWANCE
IN spite of the horrors of the day and the tea-drinking of the night, John slept the sleep of infancy. He was awakened by the maid, as it might have been ten years ago, tapping at the door. The winter sunrise was painting the east; and as the window was to the back of the house, it shone into the room with many strange colours of refracted light. Without, the houses were all cleanly roofed with snow; the garden walls were coped with it a foot in height; the greens lay glittering. Yet strange as snow had grown to John during... Long Stories - Post by : tedbosworth - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1162

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VIII. SINGULAR INSTANCE OF THE UTILITY OF PASS-KEYS The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VIII. SINGULAR INSTANCE OF THE UTILITY OF PASS-KEYS

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VIII. SINGULAR INSTANCE OF THE UTILITY OF PASS-KEYS
WHERE he ran at first, John never very clearly knew; nor yet how long a time elapsed ere he found himself in the by-road near the lodge of Ravelston, propped against the wall, his lungs heaving like bellows, his legs leaden-heavy, his mind possessed by one sole desire - to lie down and be unseen. He remembered the thick coverts round the quarry-hole pond, an untrodden corner of the world where he might surely find concealment till the night should fall. Thither he passed down the lane; and when he came there, behold! he had forgotten the frost, and the pond... Long Stories - Post by : 43920 - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 2767

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VII. A TRAGI-COMEDY IN A CAB The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VII. A TRAGI-COMEDY IN A CAB

The Misadventures Of John Nicholson: A Christmas Story - Chapter VII. A TRAGI-COMEDY IN A CAB
In front of Donaldson's Hospital, John counted it good fortune to perceive a cab a great way of, and by much shouting and waving of his arm, to catch the notice of the driver. He counted it good fortune, for the time was long to him till he should have done for ever with the Lodge; and the further he must go to find a cab, the greater the chance that the inevitable discovery had taken place, and that he should return to find the garden full of angry neighbours. Yet when the vehicle drew up he was sensibly chagrined to... Long Stories - Post by : Cutter - Date : April 2012 - Author : Robert Louis Stevenson - Read : 1996