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The American - Chapter XXVI The American - Chapter XXVI

The American - Chapter XXVI
In that uninitiated observation of the great spectacle of English lifeupon which I have touched, it might be supposed that Newman passeda great many dull days. But the dullness of his days pleased him;his melancholy, which was settling into a secondary stage,like a healing wound, had in it a certain acrid, palatable sweetness.He had company in his thoughts, and for the present he wanted no other.He had no desire to make acquaintances, and he left untouched a coupleof notes of introduction which had been sent him by Tom Tristram.He thought a great deal of Madame de Cintre--sometimes with a doggedtranquillity... Long Stories - Post by : kaybee - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2565

The American - Chapter XXV The American - Chapter XXV

The American - Chapter XXV
Newman called upon the comical duchess and found her at home.An old gentleman with a high nose and a gold-headed cane was just takingleave of her; he made Newman a protracted obeisance as he retired,and our hero supposed that he was one of the mysterious grandeeswith whom he had shaken hands at Madame de Bellegarde's ball.The duchess, in her arm-chair, from which she did not move,with a great flower-pot on one side of her, a pile of pink-coverednovels on the other, and a large piece of tapestry dependingfrom her lap, presented an expansive and imposing front;but her aspect was in the... Long Stories - Post by : bikeinfo - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2783

The American - Chapter XXIV The American - Chapter XXIV

The American - Chapter XXIV
Sunday was as yet two days off; but meanwhile, to beguile his impatience,Newman took his way to the Avenue de Messine and got what comfort he couldin staring at the blank outer wall of Madame de Cintre's present residence.The street in question, as some travelers will remember, adjoins theParc Monceau, which is one of the prettiest corners of Paris.The quarter has an air of modern opulence and convenience which seemsat variance with the ascetic institution, and the impression made uponNewman's gloomily-irritated gaze by the fresh-looking, windowless expansebehind which the woman he loved was perhaps even then pledging herselfto pass the rest... Long Stories - Post by : Darshana - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3134

The American - Chapter XXIII The American - Chapter XXIII

The American - Chapter XXIII
Newman returned to Paris the second day after his interview with Mrs. Bread.The morrow he had spent at Poitiers, reading over and over againthe little document which he had lodged in his pocket-book, and thinkingwhat he would do in the circumstances and how he would do it.He would not have said that Poitiers was an amusing place; yet the dayseemed very short. Domiciled once more in the Boulevard Haussmann,he walked over to the Rue de l'Universite and inquired of Madamede Bellegarde's portress whether the marquise had come back.The portress told him that she had arrived, with M. le Marquis,on the... Long Stories - Post by : blinky - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1630

The American - Chapter XXII The American - Chapter XXII

The American - Chapter XXII
I am very much obliged to you for coming," Newman said."I hope it won't get you into trouble.""I don't think I shall be missed. My lady, in these days,is not fond of having me about her." This was said with a certainfluttered eagerness which increased Newman's sense of havinginspired the old woman with confidence."From the first, you know," he answered, "you took an interest inmy prospects. You were on my side. That gratified me, I assure you.And now that you know what they have done to me, I am sure you arewith me all the more.""They have... Long Stories - Post by : Darshana - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3578

The American - Chapter XXI The American - Chapter XXI

The American - Chapter XXI
There is a pretty public walk at Poitiers, laid out uponthe crest of the high hill around which the little city clusters,planted with thick trees and looking down upon the fertile fieldsin which the old English princes fought for their right and held it.Newman paced up and down this quiet promenade for the greater partof the next day and let his eyes wander over the historic prospect;but he would have been sadly at a loss to tell you afterwardswhether the latter was made up of coal-fields or of vineyards.He was wholly given up to his grievance, or which reflectionby no means... Long Stories - Post by : MaxDax - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 805

The American - Chapter XX The American - Chapter XX

The American - Chapter XX
Valentin de Bellegarde died, tranquilly, just as the cold, faint March dawnbegan to illumine the faces of the little knot of friends gathered abouthis bedside. An hour afterwards Newman left the inn and drove to Geneva;he was naturally unwilling to be present at the arrival of Madame deBellegarde and her first-born. At Geneva, for the moment, he remained. He waslike a man who has had a fall and wants to sit still and count his bruises.He instantly wrote to Madame de Cintre, relating to her the circumstancesof her brother's death--with certain exceptions--and asking her what wasthe earliest moment at... Long Stories - Post by : Joe_Coon - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 910

The American - Chapter XIX The American - Chapter XIX

The American - Chapter XIX
Newman possessed a remarkable talent for sitting still when it was necessary,and he had an opportunity to use it on his journey to Switzerland.The successive hours of the night brought him no sleep, but he satmotionless in his corner of the railway-carriage, with his eyes closed,and the most observant of his fellow-travelers might have envied himhis apparent slumber. Toward morning slumber really came, as an effectof mental rather than of physical fatigue. He slept for a couple of hours,and at last, waking, found his eyes resting upon one of the snow-powderedpeaks of the Jura, behind which the sky was... Long Stories - Post by : ccain - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3246

The American - Chapter XVIII The American - Chapter XVIII

The American - Chapter XVIII
Newman went the next morning to see Madame de Cintre, timing his visitso as to arrive after the noonday breakfast. In the court of the hotel,before the portico, stood Madame de Bellegarde's old square carriage.The servant who opened the door answered Newman's inquiry with a slightlyembarrassed and hesitating murmur, and at the same moment Mrs. Breadappeared in the background, dim-visaged as usual, and wearing a largeblack bonnet and shawl."What is the matter?" asked Newman. "Is Madame la Comtesseat home, or not?"Mrs. Bread advanced, fixing her eyes upon him: he observedthat she held a sealed letter, very delicately, in... Long Stories - Post by : Iceman - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1465

The American - Chapter XVII The American - Chapter XVII

The American - Chapter XVII
Newman was fond of music and went often to the opera. A couple of eveningsafter Madame de Bellegarde's ball he sat listening to "Don Giovanni,"having in honor of this work, which he had never yet seen represented,come to occupy his orchestra-chair before the rising of the curtain.Frequently he took a large box and invited a party of his compatriots;this was a mode of recreation to which he was much addicted.He liked making up parties of his friends and conducting them to the theatre,and taking them to drive on high drags or to dine at remote restaurants.He liked doing things which... Long Stories - Post by : padin - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3397

The American - Chapter XVI The American - Chapter XVI

The American - Chapter XVI
The next ten days were the happiest that Newman had ever known.He saw Madame de Cintre every day, and never saw either old Madamede Bellegarde or the elder of his prospective brothers-in-law.Madame de Cintre at last seemed to think it becoming to apologizefor their never being present. "They are much taken up,"she said, "with doing the honors of Paris to Lord Deepmere."There was a smile in her gravity as she made this declaration,and it deepened as she added, "He is our seventh cousin, you know,and blood is thicker than water. And then, he is so interesting!"And with this she... Long Stories - Post by : hirini-reedy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2788

The American - Chapter XV The American - Chapter XV

The American - Chapter XV
Valentin de Bellegarde's announcement of the secession of MademoiselleNioche from her father's domicile and his irreverent reflectionsupon the attitude of this anxious parent in so grave a catastrophe,received a practical commentary in the fact that M. Nioche was slowto seek another interview with his late pupil. It had cost Newmansome disgust to be forced to assent to Valentin's somewhat cynicalinterpretation of the old man's philosophy, and, though circumstancesseemed to indicate that he had not given himself up to a noble despair,Newman thought it very possible he might be suffering more keenlythan was apparent. M. Nioche had been in the... Long Stories - Post by : andrewb - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2415

The American - Chapter XIV The American - Chapter XIV

The American - Chapter XIV
The next time Newman came to the Rue de l'Universitehe had the good fortune to find Madame de Cintre alone.He had come with a definite intention, and he lost no timein executing it. She wore, moreover, a look which he eagerlyinterpreted as expectancy."I have been coming to see you for six months, now," he said,"and I have never spoken to you a second time of marriage.That was what you asked me; I obeyed. Could any manhave done better?""You have acted with great delicacy," said Madame de Cintre."Well, I'm going to change, now," said Newman. "I don't mean that... Long Stories - Post by : kmatinfeacfd - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3565

The American - Chapter XIII The American - Chapter XIII

The American - Chapter XIII
Newman kept his promise, or his menace, of going often tothe Rue de l'Universite, and during the next six weeks he sawMadame de Cintre more times than he could have numbered.He flattered himself that he was not in love, but his biographermay be supposed to know better. He claimed, at least,none of the exemptions and emoluments of the romantic passion.Love, he believed, made a fool of a man, and his present emotionwas not folly but wisdom; wisdom sound, serene, well-directed.What he felt was an intense, all-consuming tenderness,which had for its object an extraordinarily gracefuland delicate, and at the same time... Long Stories - Post by : TheVirtualOne - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1174

The American - Chapter XII The American - Chapter XII

The American - Chapter XII
Three days after his introduction to the family of Madamede Cintre, Newman, coming in toward evening, found upon his tablethe card of the Marquis de Bellegarde. On the following dayhe received a note informing him that the Marquise de Bellegardewould be grateful for the honor of his company at dinner.He went, of course, though he had to break another engagementto do it. He was ushered into the room in which Madamede Bellegarde had received him before, and here he foundhis venerable hostess, surrounded by her entire family.The room was lighted only by the crackling fire,which illuminated the very small... Long Stories - Post by : jack05 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1190

The American - Chapter XI The American - Chapter XI

The American - Chapter XI
Newman, on his return to Paris, had not resumed the studyof French conversation with M. Nioche; he found that he hadtoo many other uses for his time. M. Nioche, however, came tosee him very promptly, having learned his whereabouts by amysterious process to which his patron never obtained the key.The shrunken little capitalist repeated his visit more than once.He seemed oppressed by a humiliating sense of having been overpaid,and wished apparently to redeem his debt by the offer ofgrammatical and statistical information in small installments.He wore the same decently melancholy aspect as a few months before;a few months more or... Long Stories - Post by : clivejive - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3067

The American - Chapter X The American - Chapter X

The American - Chapter X
Newman continued to see his friends the Tristrams with a good dealof frequency, though if you had listened to Mrs. Tristram's accountof the matter you would have supposed that they had been cynicallyrepudiated for the sake of grander acquaintance. "We were allvery well so long as we had no rivals--we were better than nothing.But now that you have become the fashion, and have your pick everyday of three invitations to dinner, we are tossed into the corner.I am sure it is very good of you to come and see us once a month;I wonder you don't send us your cards... Long Stories - Post by : falkenman - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1447

The American - Chapter IX The American - Chapter IX

The American - Chapter IX
He went to see Madame de Cintre the next day, and was informedby the servant that she was at home. He passed as usual upthe large, cold staircase and through a spacious vestibule above,where the walls seemed all composed of small door panels,touched with long-faded gilding; whence he was ushered intothe sitting-room in which he had already been received.It was empty, and the servant told him that Madame la Comtessewould presently appear. He had time, while he waited, to wonderwhether Bellegarde had seen his sister since the evening before,and whether in this case he had spoken to her of... Long Stories - Post by : TWarrior - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1777

The American - Chapter VIII The American - Chapter VIII

The American - Chapter VIII
"Tell me something about your sister," Newman began abruptly.Bellegarde turned and gave him a quick look. "Now that I think of it,you have never yet asked me a question about her.""I know that very well.""If it is because you don't trust me, you are very right," said Bellegarde."I can't talk of her rationally. I admire her too much.""Talk of her as you can," rejoined Newman. "Let yourself go.""Well, we are very good friends; we are such a brother and sisteras have not been seen since Orestes and Electra. You have seen her;you know what she is:... Long Stories - Post by : kaybee - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1259

The American - Chapter VII The American - Chapter VII

The American - Chapter VII
One evening very late, about a week after his visitto Madame de Cintre, Newman's servant brought him a card.It was that of young M. de Bellegarde. When, a few moments later,he went to receive his visitor, he found him standing in the middleof his great gilded parlor and eying it from cornice to carpet.M. de Bellegarde's face, it seemed to Newman, expressed a senseof lively entertainment. "What the devil is he laughing at now?"our hero asked himself. But he put the question without acrimony,for he felt that Madame de Cintre's brother was a good fellow,and he had a... Long Stories - Post by : Valenti - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2302