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The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 11 The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 11

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 11
BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER XI.When they had descended to the street Miriam mentioned to Peter that she was thirsty, dying to drink something: upon which he asked her if she should have an objection to going with him to a cafe."Objection? I've spent my life in cafes! They're warm in winter and you get your lamplight for nothing," she explained. "Mamma and I have sat in them for hours, many a time, with a _consommation of three sous, to save fire and candles at home. We've lived in places we couldn't sit in, if you want to know--where there was only really... Long Stories - Post by : tikelz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1029

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 10 The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 10

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 10
BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER X.For several days Peter Sherringham had business in hand which left him neither time nor freedom of mind to occupy himself actively with the ladies of the Hotel de la Garonne. There were moments when they brushed across his memory, but their passage was rapid and not lighted with complacent attention; for he shrank from bringing to the proof the question of whether Miriam would be an interest or only a bore. She had left him after their second meeting with a quickened sympathy, but in the course of a few hours that flame had burned dim. Like... Long Stories - Post by : sfifabian - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2880

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 9 The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 9

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 9
BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER IX.Nick Dormer found his friend Nash that evening at the place of their tryst--smoking a cigar, in the warm bright night, on the terrace of the cafe forming one of the angles of the Place de l'Opera. He sat down with him, but at the end of five minutes uttered a protest against the crush and confusion, the publicity and vulgarity of the place, the shuffling procession of the crowd, the jostle of fellow-customers, the perpetual brush of waiters. "Come away; I want to talk to you and I can't talk here. I don't care where we go.... Long Stories - Post by : clickit - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 882

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 8 The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 8

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 8
BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER VIII.At Peter Sherringham's the next day Miriam had so evidently come with the expectation of "saying" something that it was impossible such a patron of the drama should forbear to invite her, little as the exhibition at Madame Carre's could have contributed to render the invitation prompt. His curiosity had been more appeased than stimulated, but he felt none the less that he had "taken up" the dark-browed girl and her reminiscential mother and must face the immediate consequences of the act. This responsibility weighed upon him during the twenty-four hours that followed the ultimate dispersal of the... Long Stories - Post by : TomCat555 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 993

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 7 The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 7

The Tragic Muse - Book 2 - Chapter 7
BOOK SECOND. CHAPTER VII.Peter Sherringham reminded Nick the next day that he had promised to be present at Madame Carre's interview with the ladies introduced to her by Gabriel Nash; and in the afternoon, conformably to this arrangement, the two men took their way to the Rue de Constantinople. They found Mr. Nash and his friends in the small beflounced drawing-room of the old actress, who, as they learned, had sent in a request for ten minutes' grace, having been detained at a lesson--a rehearsal of the _comedie de salon about to be given for a charity by a fine lady,... Long Stories - Post by : trav_c - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2567

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 6 The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 6

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 6
BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER VI.When he arrived with the three members of his family at the restaurant of their choice Peter Sherringham was already seated there by one of the immaculate tables, but Mrs. Dallow was not yet on the scene, and they had time for a sociable settlement--time to take their places and unfold their napkins, crunch their rolls, breathe the savoury air, and watch the door, before the usual raising of heads and suspension of forks, the sort of stir that accompanied most of this lady's movements, announced her entrance. The _dame de comptoir ducked and re-ducked, the people looked... Long Stories - Post by : BigBurt - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2597

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 5 The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 5

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 5
BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER V.Lady Agnes's idea had been that her son should go straight from the Palais de l'Industrie to the Hotel de Hollande, with or without his mother and his sisters as his humour should seem to recommend. Much as she desired to see their valued Julia, and as she knew her daughters desired it, she was quite ready to put off their visit if this sacrifice should contribute to a speedy confrontation for Nick. She was anxious he should talk with Mrs. Dallow, and anxious he should be anxious himself; but it presently appeared that he was conscious of... Long Stories - Post by : ukcharta - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1972

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 4 The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 4

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 4
BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER IV.Peter's meeting with Nick was of the friendliest on both sides, involving a great many "dear fellows" and "old boys," and his salutation to the younger of the Miss Dormers consisted of the frankest "Delighted to see you, my dear Bid!" There was no kissing, but there was cousinship in the air, of a conscious, living kind, as Gabriel Nash doubtless quickly noted, hovering for a moment outside the group. Biddy said nothing to Peter Sherringham, but there was no flatness in a silence which heaved, as it were, with the fairest physiognomic portents. Nick introduced Gabriel Nash... Long Stories - Post by : oxley - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 955

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 3 The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 3

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 3
BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER III.After her companions left her Lady Agnes rested for five minutes in silence with her elder daughter, at the end of which time she observed: "I suppose one must have food at any rate," and, getting up, quitted the place where they had been sitting. "And where are we to go? I hate eating out of doors," she went on."Dear me, when one comes to Paris--!" Grace returned in a tone apparently implying that in so rash an adventure one must be prepared for compromises and concessions. The two ladies wandered to where they saw a large sign... Long Stories - Post by : pcprofit - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 750

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 2 The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 2

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 2
BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER II.Nick Dormer walked away with Biddy, but he had not gone far before he stopped in front of a clever bust his mother, in the distance, saw him playing in the air with his hand, carrying out by this gesture, which presumably was applausive, some critical remark he had made to his sister. Lady Agnes raised her glass to her eyes by the long handle to which rather a clanking chain was attached, perceiving that the bust represented an ugly old man with a bald head; at which her ladyship indefinitely sighed, though it was not apparent... Long Stories - Post by : Jim_mitchell - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2409

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 1 The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 1

The Tragic Muse - Book 1 - Chapter 1
BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER I.The people of France have made it no secret that those of England, as a general thing, are to their perception an inexpressive and speechless race, perpendicular and unsociable, unaddicted to enriching any bareness of contact with verbal or other embroidery. This view might have derived encouragement, a few years ago, in Paris, from the manner in which four persons sat together in silence, one fine day about noon, in the garden, as it is called, of the Palais de l'Industrie--the central court of the great glazed bazaar where, among plants and parterres, gravelled walks and thin fountains,... Long Stories - Post by : kamilozz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 686

The Tragic Muse - Preface The Tragic Muse - Preface

The Tragic Muse - Preface
I profess a certain vagueness of remembrance in respect to the origin and growth of _The Tragic Muse_, which appeared in the _Atlantic Monthly again, beginning January 1889 and running on, inordinately, several months beyond its proper twelve. If it be ever of interest and profit to put one's finger on the productive germ of a work of art, and if in fact a lucid account of any such work involves that prime identification, I can but look on the present fiction as a poor fatherless and motherless, a sort of unregistered and unacknowledged birth. I fail to recover my precious... Long Stories - Post by : pbarroso - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1459

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 13. Switzerland Roderick Hudson - Chapter 13. Switzerland

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 13. Switzerland
CHAPTER XIII. SwitzerlandOn the homeward walk, that evening, Roderick preserved a silence which Rowland allowed to make him uneasy. Early on the morrow Roderick, saying nothing of his intentions, started off on a walk; Rowland saw him striding with light steps along the rugged path to Engelberg. He was absent all day and he gave no account of himself on his return. He said he was deadly tired, and he went to bed early. When he had left the room Miss Garland drew near to Rowland."I wish to ask you a question," she said. "What happened to Roderick yesterday at Engelberg?""You... Long Stories - Post by : rsbombard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2958

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 12. The Princess Casamassima Roderick Hudson - Chapter 12. The Princess Casamassima

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 12. The Princess Casamassima
CHAPTER XII. The Princess CasamassimaRowland had a very friendly memory of a little mountain inn, accessible with moderate trouble from Lucerne he had once spent a blissful ten days. He had at that time been trudging, knapsack on back, over half Switzerland, and not being, on his legs, a particularly light weight, it was no shame to him to confess that he was mortally tired. The inn of which I speak presented striking analogies with a cow-stable; but in spite of this circumstance, it was crowded with hungry tourists. It stood in a high, shallow valley, with flower-strewn Alpine meadows... Long Stories - Post by : simplyme - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1501

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 11. Mrs. Hudson Roderick Hudson - Chapter 11. Mrs. Hudson

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 11. Mrs. Hudson
CHAPTER XI. Mrs. HudsonOf Roderick, meanwhile, Rowland saw nothing; but he immediately went to Mrs. Hudson and assured her that her son was in even exceptionally good health and spirits. After this he called again on the two ladies from Northampton, but, as Roderick's absence continued, he was able neither to furnish nor to obtain much comfort. Miss Garland's apprehensive face seemed to him an image of his own state of mind. He was profoundly depressed; he felt that there was a storm in the air, and he wished it would come, without more delay, and perform its ravages. On the... Long Stories - Post by : Atkinson - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1164

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 10. The Cavaliere Roderick Hudson - Chapter 10. The Cavaliere

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 10. The Cavaliere
CHAPTER X. The CavaliereThere befell at last a couple of days during which Rowland was unable to go to the hotel. Late in the evening of the second one Roderick came into his room. In a few moments he announced that he had finished the bust of his mother."And it 's magnificent!" he declared. "It 's one of the best things I have done.""I believe it," said Rowland. "Never again talk to me about your inspiration being dead.""Why not? This may be its last kick! I feel very tired. But it 's a masterpiece, though I do say it. They tell... Long Stories - Post by : go4dollars - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1233

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 9. Mary Garland Roderick Hudson - Chapter 9. Mary Garland

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 9. Mary Garland
CHAPTER IX. Mary GarlandHow it befell that Roderick had failed to be in Leghorn on his mother's arrival never clearly transpired; for he undertook to give no elaborate explanation of his fault. He never indulged in professions (touching personal conduct) as to the future, or in remorse as to the past, and as he would have asked no praise if he had traveled night and day to embrace his mother as she set foot on shore, he made (in Rowland's presence, at least) no apology for having left her to come in search of him. It was to be said that,... Long Stories - Post by : Ginryu - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3576

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 8. Provocation Roderick Hudson - Chapter 8. Provocation

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 8. Provocation
CHAPTER VIII. ProvocationAbout a month later, Rowland addressed to his cousin Cecilia a letter of which the following is a portion:--... "So much for myself; yet I tell you but a tithe of my own story unless I let you know how matters stand with poor Hudson, for he gives me more to think about just now than anything else in the world. I need a good deal of courage to begin this chapter. You warned me, you know, and I made rather light of your warning. I have had all kinds of hopes and fears, but hitherto, in writing to... Long Stories - Post by : Deck_Warrior - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1886

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 7. Saint Cecilia's Roderick Hudson - Chapter 7. Saint Cecilia's

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 7. Saint Cecilia's
CHAPTER VII. Saint Cecilia'sRowland went often to the Coliseum; he never wearied of it. One morning, about a month after his return from Frascati, as he was strolling across the vast arena, he observed a young woman seated on one of the fragments of stone which are ranged along the line of the ancient parapet. It seemed to him that he had seen her before, but he was unable to localize her face. Passing her again, he perceived that one of the little red-legged French soldiers at that time on guard there had approached her and was gallantly making himself agreeable.... Long Stories - Post by : tontonlefou - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3547

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 6. Frascati Roderick Hudson - Chapter 6. Frascati

Roderick Hudson - Chapter 6. Frascati
CHAPTER VI. FrascatiOne day, on entering Roderick's lodging (not the modest rooms on the Ripetta which he had first occupied, but a much more sumptuous apartment on the Corso), Rowland found a letter on the table addressed to himself. It was from Roderick, and consisted of but three lines: "I am gone to Frascati--for meditation. If I am not at home on Friday, you had better join me." On Friday he was still absent, and Rowland went out to Frascati. Here he found his friend living at the inn and spending his days, according to his own account, lying under the... Long Stories - Post by : moneysence - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1861