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The Bostonians - Chapter 13 The Bostonians - Chapter 13

The Bostonians - Chapter 13
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XIIIMrs. Tarrant was delighted, as may be imagined, with her daughter'saccount of Miss Chancellor's interior, and the reception the girl hadfound there; and Verena, for the next month, took her way very often toCharles Street. "Just you be as nice to her as you know how," Mrs.Tarrant had said to her; and she reflected with some complacency thather daughter did know--she knew how to do everything of that sort. Itwas not that Verena had been taught; that branch of the education ofyoung ladies which is known as "manners and deportment" had not figured,as a definite head,... Long Stories - Post by : atisa - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1675

The Bostonians - Chapter 12 The Bostonians - Chapter 12

The Bostonians - Chapter 12
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XII.Verena recognised him; she had seen him the night before at MissBirdseye's, and she said to her hostess, "Now I must go--you have gotanother caller!" It was Verena's belief that in the fashionable world(like Mrs. Farrinder, she thought Miss Chancellor belonged toit--thought that, in standing there, she herself was in it)--in thehighest social walks it was the custom of a prior guest to depart whenanother friend arrived. She had been told at people's doors that shecould not be received because the lady of the house had a visitor, andshe had retired on these occasions with a... Long Stories - Post by : SteveSimard - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1173

The Bostonians - Chapter 11 The Bostonians - Chapter 11

The Bostonians - Chapter 11
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER XI."I was certain you would come--I have felt it all day--something toldme!" It was with these words that Olive Chancellor greeted her youngvisitor, coming to her quickly from the window she might havebeen waiting for her arrival. Some weeks later she explained to Verenahow definite this prevision had been, how it had filled her all day witha nervous agitation so violent as to be painful. She told her that suchforebodings were a peculiarity of her organisation, that she didn't knowwhat to make of them, that she had to accept them; and she mentioned, asanother example,... Long Stories - Post by : nekjustin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2223

The Bostonians - Chapter 10 The Bostonians - Chapter 10

The Bostonians - Chapter 10
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER X.Verena Tarrant came in the very next day from Cambridge to CharlesStreet; that quarter of Boston is in direct communication with theacademic suburb. It hardly seemed direct to poor Verena, perhaps, who,in the crowded street-car which deposited her finally at MissChancellor's door, had to stand up all the way, half suspended by aleathern strap from the glazed roof of the stifling vehicle, like someblooming cluster dangling in a hothouse. She was used, however, to theseperpendicular journeys, and though, as we have seen, she was notinclined to accept without question the social arrangements of her time,it never... Long Stories - Post by : lichtde - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1583

The Bostonians - Chapter 9 The Bostonians - Chapter 9

The Bostonians - Chapter 9
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER IX.Ransom approached Mrs. Farrinder again, who had remained on her sofawith Olive Chancellor; and as she turned her face to him he saw that shehad felt the universal contagion. Her keen eye sparkled, there was aflush on her matronly cheek, and she had evidently made up her mind whatline to take. Olive Chancellor sat motionless; her eyes were fixed onthe floor with the rigid, alarmed expression of her moments of nervousdiffidence; she gave no sign of observing her kinsman's approach. Hesaid something to Mrs. Farrinder, something that imperfectly representedhis admiration of Verena; and this lady replied... Long Stories - Post by : sivko23 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2964

The Bostonians - Chapter 8 The Bostonians - Chapter 8

The Bostonians - Chapter 8
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER VIII.Verena Tarrant got up and went to her father in the middle of the room;Olive Chancellor crossed and resumed her place beside Mrs. Farrinder onthe sofa the girl had quitted; and Miss Birdseye's visitors, for therest, settled themselves attentively in chairs or leaned against thebare sides of the parlour. Verena took her father's hands, held them fora moment, while she stood before him, not looking at him, with her eyestowards the company; then, after an instant, her mother, rising, pushedforward, with an interesting sigh, the chair on which she had beensitting. Mrs. Tarrant was provided with... Long Stories - Post by : jcaviness - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3508

The Bostonians - Chapter 7 The Bostonians - Chapter 7

The Bostonians - Chapter 7
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER VII.She had no sooner left him than Olive Chancellor came towards him witheyes that seemed to say, "I don't care whether you are here now ornot--I'm all right!" But what her lips said was much more gracious; sheasked him if she mightn't have the pleasure of introducing him to Mrs.Farrinder. Ransom consented, with a little of his Southern flourish, andin a moment the lady got up to receive him from the midst of the circlethat now surrounded her. It was an occasion for her to justify herreputation of an elegant manner, and it must be impartially... Long Stories - Post by : pehjr99 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3006

The Bostonians - Chapter 6 The Bostonians - Chapter 6

The Bostonians - Chapter 6
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER VI."Oh, thank you," said Miss Birdseye, "I shouldn't like to lose it; itwas given me by Mirandola!" He had been one of her refugees in the oldtime, when two or three of her friends, acquainted with the limits ofhis resources, wondered how he had come into possession of the trinket.She had been diverted again, after her greeting with Doctor and Mrs.Tarrant, by stopping to introduce the tall, dark young man whom MissChancellor had brought with her to Doctor Prance. She had becomeconscious of his somewhat sombre figure, uplifted against the wall, nearthe door; he was leaning... Long Stories - Post by : epsilon7 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 750

The Bostonians - Chapter 5 The Bostonians - Chapter 5

The Bostonians - Chapter 5
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER V.Mrs. Farrinder, meanwhile, was not eager to address the assembly. Sheconfessed as much to Olive Chancellor, with a smile which asked that atemporary lapse of promptness might not be too harshly judged. She hadaddressed so many assemblies, and she wanted to hear what other peoplehad to say. Miss Chancellor herself had thought so much on the vitalsubject; would not she make a few remarks and give them some of herexperiences? How did the ladies on Beacon Street feel about the ballot?Perhaps she could speak for _them more than for some others. That was abranch of the... Long Stories - Post by : yunzhe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3483

The Bostonians - Chapter 4 The Bostonians - Chapter 4

The Bostonians - Chapter 4
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER IV.She had told him before they started that they should be early; shewished to see Miss Birdseye alone, before the arrival of any one else.This was just for the pleasure of seeing her--it was an opportunity; shewas always so taken up with others. She received Miss Chancellor in thehall of the mansion, which had a salient front, an enormous and veryhigh number--756--painted in gilt on the glass light above the door, atin sign bearing the name of a doctress (Mary J. Prance) suspended fromone of the windows of the basement, and a peculiar look of being... Long Stories - Post by : tukshad - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1714

The Bostonians - Chapter 3 The Bostonians - Chapter 3

The Bostonians - Chapter 3
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER III.When he had told her that if she would take him as he was he should bevery happy to dine with her, she excused herself a moment and went togive an order in the dining-room. The young man, left alone, lookedabout the parlour--the two parlours which, in their prolonged, adjacentnarrowness, formed evidently one apartment--and wandered to the windowsat the back there was a view of the water; Miss Chancellor havingthe good fortune to dwell on that side of Charles Street toward which,in the rear, the afternoon sun slants redly, from an horizon indented atempty intervals... Long Stories - Post by : weimei - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3455

The Bostonians - Chapter 2 The Bostonians - Chapter 2

The Bostonians - Chapter 2
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER II.Whether much or little consideration had been directed to the result,Miss Chancellor certainly would not have incurred this reproach. She washabited in a plain dark dress, without any ornaments, and her smooth,colourless hair was confined as carefully as that of her sister wasencouraged to stray. She had instantly seated herself, and while Mrs.Luna talked she kept her eyes on the ground, glancing even less towardBasil Ransom than toward that woman of many words. The young man wastherefore free to look at her; a contemplation which showed him that shewas agitated and trying to conceal it. He... Long Stories - Post by : zakirhr - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2668

The Bostonians - Chapter 1 (Volume 1 Book 1) The Bostonians - Chapter 1 (Volume 1 Book 1)

The Bostonians - Chapter 1 (Volume 1 Book 1)
VOLUME I. BOOK FIRST. CHAPTER I."Olive will come down in about ten minutes; she told me to tell youthat. About ten; that is exactly like Olive. Neither five nor fifteen,and yet not ten exactly, but either nine or eleven. She didn't tell meto say she was glad to see you, because she doesn't know whether she isor not, and she wouldn't for the world expose herself to telling a fib.She is very honest, is Olive Chancellor; she is full of rectitude.Nobody tells fibs in Boston; I don't know what to make of them all.Well, I am very glad to see you,... Long Stories - Post by : vlutz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3530

Italian Hours - The Saint's Afternoon And Others Italian Hours - The Saint's Afternoon And Others

Italian Hours - The Saint's Afternoon And Others
Before and above all was the sense that, with the narrow limits of past adventure, I had never yet had such an impression of what the summer could be in the south or the south in the summer; but I promptly found it, for the occasion, a good fortune that my terms of comparison were restricted. It was really something, at a time when the stride of the traveller had become as long as it was easy, when the seven-league boots positively hung, for frequent use, in the closet of the most sedentary, to have kept one's self so innocent of... Nonfictions - Post by : bhaggett - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3431

Italian Hours - Ravenna Italian Hours - Ravenna

Italian Hours - Ravenna
I write these lines on a cold Swiss mountain-top, shut in by an intense white mist from any glimpse of the underworld of lovely Italy; but as I jotted down the other day in the ancient capital of Honorius and Theodoric the few notes of which they are composed, I let the original date stand for local colour's sake. Its mere look, as I transcribe it, emits a grateful glow in the midst of the Alpine rawness, and gives a depressed imagination something tangible to grasp while awaiting the return of fine weather. For Ravenna was glowing, less than a week... Nonfictions - Post by : LindaP - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1778

Italian Hours - Other Tuscan Cities Italian Hours - Other Tuscan Cities

Italian Hours - Other Tuscan Cities
II had scanted charming Pisa even as I had scanted great Siena in my original small report of it, my scarce more than stammering notes of years before; but even if there had been meagreness of mere gaping vision--which there in fact hadn't been--as well as insufficieny of public tribute, the indignity would soon have ceased to weigh on my conscience. For to this affection I was to return again still oftener than to the strong call of Siena my eventual frequentations of Pisa, all merely impressionistic and amateurish as they might be--and I pretended, up and down the length of... Nonfictions - Post by : doitpower - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3097

Italian Hours - Tuscan Cities Italian Hours - Tuscan Cities

Italian Hours - Tuscan Cities
The cities I refer to are Leghorn, Pisa, Lucca and Pistoia, among which I have been spending the last few days. The most striking fact as to Leghorn, it must be conceded at the outset, is that, being in Tuscany, it should be so scantily Tuscan. The traveller curious in local colour must content himself with the deep blue expanse of the Mediterranean. The streets, away from the docks, are modern, genteel and rectangular; Liverpool might acknowledge them if it weren't for their clean-coloured, sun- bleached stucco. They are the offspring of the new industry which is death to the old... Nonfictions - Post by : dducote - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1614

Italian Hours - Florentine Notes Italian Hours - Florentine Notes

Italian Hours - Florentine Notes
IYesterday that languid organism known as the Florentine Carnival put on a momentary semblance of vigour, and decreed a general corso through the town. The spectacle was not brilliant, but it suggested some natural reflections. I encountered the line of carriages in the square before Santa Croce, of which they were making the circuit. They rolled solemnly by, with their inmates frowning forth at each other in apparent wrath at not finding each other more worth while. There were no masks, no costumes, no decorations, no throwing of flowers or sweetmeats. It was as if each carriageful had privately and not... Nonfictions - Post by : eheyoka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3208

Italian Hours - The Autumn In Florence Italian Hours - The Autumn In Florence

Italian Hours - The Autumn In Florence
Florence too has its "season," not less than Rome, and I have been rejoicing for the past six weeks in the fact that this comparatively crowded parenthesis hasn't yet been opened. Coming here in the first days of October I found the summer still in almost unmenaced possession, and ever since, till within a day or two, the weight of its hand has been sensible. Properly enough, as the city of flowers, Florence mingles the elements most artfully in the spring--during the divine crescendo of March and April, the weeks when six months of steady shiver have still not shaken New... Nonfictions - Post by : rjudkins - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2206

Italian Hours - Siena Early And Late Italian Hours - Siena Early And Late

Italian Hours - Siena Early And Late
IFlorence being oppressively hot and delivered over to the mosquitoes, the occasion seemed to favour that visit to Siena which I had more than once planned and missed. I arrived late in the evening, by the light of a magnificent moon, and while a couple of benignantly-mumbling old crones were making up my bed at the inn strolled forth in quest of a first impression. Five minutes brought me to where I might gather it unhindered as it bloomed in the white moonshine. The great Piazza of Siena is famous, and though in this day of multiplied photographs and blunted surprises... Nonfictions - Post by : glodge - Date : May 2012 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2339