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The Europeans - Chapter 8 The Europeans - Chapter 8

The Europeans - Chapter 8
Chapter VIII Charlotte and Mr. Brand had not returned when they reached the house; but the Baroness had come to tea, and Robert Acton also, who now regularly asked for a place at this generous repast or made his appearance later in the evening. Clifford Wentworth, with his juvenile growl, remarked upon it. "You are always coming to tea nowadays, Robert," he said. "I should think you had drunk enough tea in China." "Since when is Mr. Acton more frequent?" asked the Baroness. "Since you came," said Clifford. "It seems as if you were a kind of attraction." "I suppose... Long Stories - Post by : ALANJAN - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1356

The Europeans - Chapter 7 The Europeans - Chapter 7

The Europeans - Chapter 7
Chapter VII Felix young finished Gertrude's portrait, and he afterwards transferred to canvas the features of many members of that circle of which it may be said that he had become for the time the pivot and the centre. I am afraid it must be confessed that he was a decidedly flattering painter, and that he imparted to his models a romantic grace which seemed easily and cheaply acquired by the payment of a hundred dollars to a young man who made "sitting" so entertaining. For Felix was paid for his pictures, making, as he did, no secret of the fact... Long Stories - Post by : voicewaveteam - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 793

The Europeans - Chapter 6 The Europeans - Chapter 6

The Europeans - Chapter 6
Chapter VI Going of an afternoon to call upon his niece, Mr. Wentworth more than once found Robert Acton sitting in her little drawing-room. This was in no degree, to Mr. Wentworth, a perturbing fact, for he had no sense of competing with his young kinsman for Eugenia's good graces. Madame Munster's uncle had the highest opinion of Robert Acton, who, indeed, in the family at large, was the object of a great deal of undemonstrative appreciation. They were all proud of him, in so far as the charge of being proud may be brought against people who were, habitually,... Long Stories - Post by : bernardvaima - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1406

The Europeans - Chapter 5 The Europeans - Chapter 5

The Europeans - Chapter 5
Chapter V Mr. Wentworth, with his cane and his gloves in his hand, went every afternoon to call upon his niece. A couple of hours later she came over to the great house to tea. She had let the proposal that she should regularly dine there fall to the ground; she was in the enjoyment of whatever satisfaction was to be derived from the spectacle of an old negress in a crimson turban shelling peas under the apple-trees. Charlotte, who had provided the ancient negress, thought it must be a strange household, Eugenia having told her that Augustine managed... Long Stories - Post by : davidku - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 976

The Europeans - Chapter 4 The Europeans - Chapter 4

The Europeans - Chapter 4
Chapter IV A few days after the Baroness Munster had presented herself to her American kinsfolk she came, with her brother, and took up her abode in that small white house adjacent to Mr. Wentworth's own dwelling of which mention has already been made. It was on going with his daughters to return her visit that Mr. Wentworth placed this comfortable cottage at her service; the offer being the result of a domestic colloquy, diffused through the ensuing twenty-four hours, in the course of which the two foreign visitors were discussed and analyzed with a great deal of earnestness and subtlety.... Long Stories - Post by : 15547 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1586

The Europeans - Chapter 3 The Europeans - Chapter 3

The Europeans - Chapter 3
Chapter III That evening at dinner Felix Young gave his sister, the Baroness Munster, an account of his impressions. She saw that he had come back in the highest possible spirits; but this fact, to her own mind, was not a reason for rejoicing. She had but a limited confidence in her brother's judgment; his capacity for taking rose-colored views was such as to vulgarize one of the prettiest of tints. Still, she supposed he could be trusted to give her the mere facts; and she invited him with some eagerness to communicate them. "I suppose, at least, they... Long Stories - Post by : tpearl5 - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3287

The Europeans - Chapter 2 The Europeans - Chapter 2

The Europeans - Chapter 2
Chapter II The next day was splendid, as Felix had prophesied; if the winter had suddenly leaped into spring, the spring had for the moment as quickly leaped into summer. This was an observation made by a young girl who came out of a large square house in the country, and strolled about in the spacious garden which separated it from a muddy road. The flowering shrubs and the neatly-disposed plants were basking in the abundant light and warmth; the transparent shade of the great elms--they were magnificent trees--seemed to thicken by the hour; and the intensely habitual stillness offered... Long Stories - Post by : ksloan - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2687

The Europeans - Chapter 1 The Europeans - Chapter 1

The Europeans - Chapter 1
Chapter I A narrow grave-yard in the heart of a bustling, indifferent city, seen from the windows of a gloomy-looking inn, is at no time an object of enlivening suggestion; and the spectacle is not at its best when the mouldy tombstones and funereal umbrage have received the ineffectual refreshment of a dull, moist snow-fall. If, while the air is thickened by this frosty drizzle, the calendar should happen to indicate that the blessed vernal season is already six weeks old, it will be admitted that no depressing influence is absent from the scene. This fact was keenly felt on a... Long Stories - Post by : Sandi_McQuade - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 714

Daisy Miller - PART II Daisy Miller - PART II

Daisy Miller - PART II
Winterbourne, who had returned to Geneva the day after his excursion to Chillon, went to Rome toward the end of January. His aunt had been established there for several weeks, and he had received a couple of letters from her. "Those people you were so devoted to last summer at Vevey have turned up here, courier and all," she wrote. "They seem to have made several acquaintances, but the courier continues to be the most intime. The young lady, however, is also very intimate with some third-rate Italians, with whom she rackets about in a way that makes much talk.... Short Stories - Post by : prospertogether - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2698

Daisy Miller - PART I Daisy Miller - PART I

Daisy Miller - PART I
At the little town of Vevey, in Switzerland, there is a particularly comfortable hotel. There are, indeed, many hotels, for the entertainment of tourists is the business of the place, which, as many travelers will remember, is seated upon the edge of a remarkably blue lake--a lake that it behooves every tourist to visit. The shore of the lake presents an unbroken array of establishments of this order, of every category, from the "grand hotel" of the newest fashion, with a chalk-white front, a hundred balconies, and a dozen flags flying from its roof, to the little Swiss pension... Short Stories - Post by : Sandi_McQuade - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2949

Confidence - Chapter XXX Confidence - Chapter XXX

Confidence - Chapter XXX
Some three evenings after he received this last report ofthe progress of affairs in Paris, Bernard, upon whom the burdenof exile sat none the more lightly as the days went on,turned out of the Strand into one of the theatres. He had beengloomily pushing his way through the various London densities--the November fog, the nocturnal darkness, the jostling crowd.He was too restless to do anything but walk, and he had beensaying to himself, for the thousandth time, that if he hadbeen guilty of a misdemeanor in succumbing to the attractionsof the admirable girl who showed to such advantage in lettersof... Long Stories - Post by : majorian - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2852

Confidence - Chapter XXIX Confidence - Chapter XXIX

Confidence - Chapter XXIX
This statement was very effective, but it might well have seemedat first to do more credit to her satiric powers than to her facultyof observation. This was the light in which it presented itselfto Bernard; but, little by little, as she amplified the text, he grewto think well of it, and at last he was quite ready to place it,as a triumph of sagacity, on a level with that other discoverywhich she had made the evening before and with regard to whichhis especial errand to-day had been to congratulate her afresh.It brought him, however, less satisfaction than it appeared to... Long Stories - Post by : ebonilic - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3549

Confidence - Chapter XXVIII Confidence - Chapter XXVIII

Confidence - Chapter XXVIII
This observation struck Bernard as extremely ingeniousand worthy of his mistress's fine intelligence; he greeted itwith enthusiasm, and thought of it for the next twelve hours.The more he thought of it the more felicitous it seemed to him,and he went to Mrs. Vivian's the next day almost for the expresspurpose of saying to Angela that, decidedly, she was right.He was admitted by his old friend, the little femme de chambre,who had long since bestowed upon him, definitively, her confidence;and as in the ante-chamber he heard the voice of a gentlemanraised and talking with some emphasis, come to him fromthe salon, he... Long Stories - Post by : jgvteam - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1317

Confidence - Chapter XXVII Confidence - Chapter XXVII

Confidence - Chapter XXVII
At the same moment the door was thrown open, and Mrs. Gordonappeared on the threshold with a gentleman behind her.Blanche stood an instant looking into the lighted room and hesitating--flushed a little, smiling, extremely pretty."May I come in?" she said, "and may I bring in Captain Lovelock?"The two ladies, of course, fluttering toward her with every demonstrationof hospitality, drew her into the room, while Bernard proceeded to greetthe Captain, who advanced with a certain awkward and bashful majesty,almost sweeping with his great stature Mrs. Vivian's humble ceiling.There was a tender exchange of embraces between Blanche and her friends,and the charming visitor,... Long Stories - Post by : wicked3dge - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1605

Confidence - Chapter XXVI Confidence - Chapter XXVI

Confidence - Chapter XXVI
Bernard sat thinking for a long time; at first with a good dealof mortification--at last with a good deal of bitterness.He felt angry at last; but he was not angry with himself.He was displeased with poor Gordon, and with Gordon's displeasure.He was uncomfortable, and he was vexed at his discomfort.It formed, it seemed to him, no natural part of his situation;he had had no glimpse of it in the book of fate where he registeredon a fair blank page his betrothal to a charming girl.That Gordon should be surprised, and even a little shockedand annoyed--this was his right and his privilege;Bernard... Long Stories - Post by : fbyrne - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2108

Confidence - Chapter XXV Confidence - Chapter XXV

Confidence - Chapter XXV
Gordon took his arm and they gained the street; they strolledin the direction of the Champs Elysees."For a little exercise and a good deal of talk, it 's the pleasantest place,"said Gordon. "I have a good deal to say; I have a good deal to ask you."Bernard felt the familiar pressure of his friend's hand, as itrested on his arm, and it seemed to him never to have lain therewith so heavy a weight. It held him fast--it held him to account;it seemed a physical symbol of responsibility. Bernard wasnot re-assured by hearing that Gordon had a great... Long Stories - Post by : Beier - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 825

Confidence - Chapter XXIV Confidence - Chapter XXIV

Confidence - Chapter XXIV
Bernard prepared for Gordon's arrival in Paris, which,according to his letter, would take place in a few days.He was not intending to stop in England; Blanche desiredto proceed immediately to the French capital, to conferwith her man-milliner, after which it was probable thatthey would go to Italy or to the East for the winter."I have given her a choice of Rome or the Nile," said Gordon,"but she tells me she does n't care a fig where we go."I say that Bernard prepared to receive his friends, and Imean that he prepared morally--or even intellectually.Materially speaking, he could simply hold himself in... Long Stories - Post by : Jeremy_Daley - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 3163

Confidence - Chapter XXIII Confidence - Chapter XXIII

Confidence - Chapter XXIII
And he had them in fact. He called the next day at the same hour,and he found the mother and the daughter together in their pretty salon.Angela was very gentle and gracious; he suspected Mrs. Vivian had givenher a tender little lecture upon the manner in which she had receivedhim the day before. After he had been there five minutes, Mrs. Viviantook a decanter of water that was standing upon a table and went out onthe balcony to irrigate her flowers. Bernard watched her a while from hisplace in the room; then she moved along the balcony and... Long Stories - Post by : buffer - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1724

Confidence - Chapter XXII Confidence - Chapter XXII

Confidence - Chapter XXII
It was opened by the little waiting-maid whom he had seen at Blanquais,and who looked at him very hard before she answered his inquiry."You see I have found Mrs. Vivian's dwelling, though you would n't give methe address," Bernard said to her, smiling."Monsieur has put some time to it!" the young woman answered dryly.And she informed him that Madame was at home, though Mademoiselle,for whom he had not asked, was not.Mrs. Vivian occupied a diminutive apartment at the summit of oneof the tall white houses which ornament the neighborhood of the Arcde Triomphe. The early days of September had arrived,... Long Stories - Post by : john_kennedy - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 2792

Confidence - Chapter XXI Confidence - Chapter XXI

Confidence - Chapter XXI
It filled him with a kind of awe, and the feeling was by nomeans agreeable. It was not a feeling to which even a manof Bernard Longueville's easy power of extracting the savourfrom a sensation could rapidly habituate himself, and for the restof that night it was far from making of our hero the happy manthat a lover just coming to self-consciousness is supposed to be.It was wrong--it was dishonorable--it was impossible--and yet it was;it was, as nothing in his own personal experience had ever been.He seemed hitherto to have been living by proxy, in a vision,in reflection--to have been... Long Stories - Post by : Akiba - Date : January 2011 - Author : Henry James - Read : 1606