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Full Online Book HomePoemsWhen The Full-grown Poet Came
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When The Full-grown Poet Came Post by :olmanviejo Category :Poems Author :Walt Whitman Date :June 2011 Read :1900

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When The Full-grown Poet Came

When the full-grown poet came,

Out spake pleased Nature (the round impassive globe, with all its shows of day and night,) saying, He is mine;

But out spake too the Soul of man, proud, jealous and unreconciled, Nay he is mine alone;

--Then the full-grown poet stood between the two, and took each by the hand;

And to-day and ever so stands, as blender, uniter, tightly holding hands,

Which he will never release until he reconciles the two,

And wholly and joyously blends them.





(The end)
Walt Whitman's poem: When The Full-Grown Poet Came

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