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Full Online Book HomePoemsTo Marcus T. Cicero
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To Marcus T. Cicero Post by :barkindo Category :Poems Author :Richard Lovelace Date :October 2011 Read :2330

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To Marcus T. Cicero

AD M. T. CICERONEM.
CATUL EP. 50.

Disertissime Romuli nepotum,
Quot sunt, quotque fuere, Marce Tulli,
Quotque post alios erunt in annos,
Gratias tibi maximas Catullus
Agit, pessimus omnium poeta:
Tanto pessimus omnium poeta,
Quanto tu optimus omnium patronus.


TO MARCUS T. CICERO.
IN AN ENGLISH PENTASTICK.

Tully to thee, Rome's eloquent sole heir,
The best of all that are, shall be, and were,
I the worst poet send my best thanks and pray'r:
Ev'n by how much the worst of poets I,
By so much you the best of patrones be.



(The end)
Richard Lovelace's poem: To Marcus T. Cicero

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