Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomePoemsThe Death Of Aliatar
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
The Death Of Aliatar Post by :profits2you Category :Poems Author :William Cullen Bryant Date :January 2011 Read :1796

Click below to download : The Death Of Aliatar (Format : PDF)

The Death Of Aliatar

FROM THE SPANISH.


'Tis not with gilded sabres
That gleam in baldricks blue,
Nor nodding plumes in caps of Fez,
Of gay and gaudy hue--
But, habited in mourning weeds,
Come marching from afar,
By four and four, the valiant men
Who fought with Aliatar.
All mournfully and slowly
The afflicted warriors come,
To the deep wail of the trumpet,
And beat of muffled drum.

The banner of the Phenix,
The flag that loved the sky,
That scarce the wind dared wanton with,
It flew so proud and high--
Now leaves its place in battle-field,
And sweeps the ground in grief,
The bearer drags its glorious folds
Behind the fallen chief,
As mournfully and slowly
The afflicted warriors come,
To the deep wail of the trumpet,
And beat of muffled drum.

Brave Aliatar led forward
A hundred Moors to go
To where his brother held Motril
Against the leaguering foe.
On horseback went the gallant Moor,
That gallant band to lead;
And now his bier is at the gate,
From whence he pricked his steed.
While mournfully and slowly
The afflicted warriors come,
To the deep wail of the trumpet,
And beat of muffled drum.

The knights of the Grand Master
In crowded ambush lay;
They rushed upon him where the reeds
Were thick beside the way;
They smote the valiant Aliatar,
They smote the warrior dead,
And broken, but not beaten, were
The gallant ranks he led.
Now mournfully and slowly
The afflicted warriors come,
To the deep wail of the trumpet,
And beat of muffled drum.

Oh! what was Zayda's sorrow,
How passionate her cries!
Her lover's wounds streamed not more free
Than that poor maiden's eyes.
Say, Love--for didst thou see her tears:
Oh, no! he drew more tight
The blinding fillet o'er his lids
To spare his eyes the sight.
While mournfully and slowly
The afflicted warriors come,
To the deep wail of the trumpet,
And beat of muffled drum.

Nor Zayda weeps him only,
But all that dwell between
The great Alhambra's palace walls
And springs of Albaicin.
The ladies weep the flower of knights,
The brave the bravest here;
The people weep a champion,
The Alcaydes a noble peer.
While mournfully and slowly
The afflicted warriors come,
To the deep wail of the trumpet,
And beat of muffled drum.


(Note:
THE DEATH OF ALIATAR.

_Say, Love--for thou didst see her tears_, &c.

The stanza beginning with this line stands thus in the original:--

Dilo tu, amor, si lo viste;
iMas ay! que de lastimado
Diste otro nudo a la venda,
Para no ver lo que ha pasado.

I am sorry to find so poor a conceit deforming so spirited a composition as this old ballad, but I have preserved it in the version. It is one of those extravagances which afterward became so common in Spanish poetry, when Gongora introduced the _estilo culto_, as it was called.)


(The end)
William Cullen Bryant's poem: Death Of Aliatar

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

Love In The Age Of Chivalry Love In The Age Of Chivalry

Love In The Age Of Chivalry
FROM PEYRE VIDAL, THE TROUBADOUR.The earth was sown with early flowers, The heavens were blue and bright--I met a youthful cavalier As lovely as the light.I knew him not--but in my heart His graceful image lies,And well I marked his open brow, His sweet and tender eyes,His ruddy lips that ever smiled, His glittering teeth betwixt,And flowing robe embroidered o'er, With leaves and blossoms mixed.He wore a chaplet of the rose; His palfrey, white and sleek,Was marked with many an ebon spot, And many a purple streak;Of jasper was his saddle-bow, His housings sapphire stone,And brightly in his stirrup glanced The
PREVIOUS BOOKS

The Alcayde Of Molina The Alcayde Of Molina

The Alcayde Of Molina
FROM THE SPANISH.To the town of Atienza, Molina's brave Alcayde,The courteous and the valorous, led forth his bold brigade.The Moor came back in triumph, he came without a wound,With many a Christian standard, and Christian captive bound.He passed the city portals, with swelling heart and vein,And towards his lady's dwelling he rode with slackened rein;Two circuits on his charger he took, and at the third,From the door of her balcony Zelinda's voice was heard."Now if thou wert not shameless," said the lady to the Moor,"Thou wouldst neither pass my dwelling, nor stop before my door.Alas for poor Zelinda, and for her
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT