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The Commonplace Post by :SuzanneKnight Category :Poems Author :Walt Whitman Date :June 2011 Read :2468

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The Commonplace

The commonplace I sing;
How cheap is health! how cheap nobility!
Abstinence, no falsehood, no gluttony, lust;
The open air I sing, freedom, toleration,
(Take here the mainest lesson--less from books--less from the schools,)
The common day and night--the common earth and waters,
Your farm--your work, trade, occupation,
The democratic wisdom underneath, like solid ground for all.

(The end)
Walt Whitman's poem: Commonplace

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