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Full Online Book HomePoemsSonnets: Miscellaneous Sonnets - Written in very early Youth
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Sonnets: Miscellaneous Sonnets - Written in very early Youth Post by :tevinj Category :Poems Author :William Wordsworth Date :July 2011 Read :2426

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Sonnets: Miscellaneous Sonnets - Written in very early Youth

Written in very early Youth


Calm is all nature as a resting wheel.
The Kine are couch'd upon the dewy grass;
The Horse alone, seen dimly as I pass,
Is up, and cropping yet his later meal:
Dark is the ground; a slumber seems to steal
O'er vale, and mountain, and the starless sky.
Now, in this blank of things, a harmony
Home-felt, and home-created seems to heal
That grief for which the senses still supply
Fresh food; for only then, when memory
Is hush'd, am I at rest. My Friends, restrain
Those busy cares that would allay my pain:
Oh! leave me to myself; nor let me feel
The officious touch that makes me droop again.

Content of Written in very early Youth (William Wordsworth's poems: Part The First - Miscellaneous Sonnets)

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