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Full Online Book HomePoemsSenecae Ex Cleanthe
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Senecae Ex Cleanthe Post by :hunneramper Category :Poems Author :Richard Lovelace Date :October 2011 Read :1283

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Senecae Ex Cleanthe

SENECAE EX CLEANTHE.

Duc me, Parens celsique Dominator poli,
Quocunque placuit, nulla parendi mora est;
Adsum impiger; fac nolle, comitabor gemens,
Malusque patiar facere, quod licuit bono.
Ducunt volentem Fata, nolentem trahunt.


ENGLISHED.

Parent and Prince of Heav'n, O lead, I pray,
Where ere you please, I follow and obey.
Active I go, sighing, if you gainsay,
And suffer bad what to the good was law.
Fates lead the willing, but unwilling draw.





(The end)
Richard Lovelace's poem: Senecae Ex Cleanthe

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