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Sapphic Fragment Post by :imported_n/a Category :Poems Author :Thomas Hardy Date :December 2010 Read :3390

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Sapphic Fragment

"Thou shalt be--Nothing."--OMAR KHAYYAM.
"Tombless, with no remembrance."--W. SHAKESPEARE.

Dead shalt thou lie; and nought
Be told of thee or thought,
For thou hast plucked not of the Muses' tree:
And even in Hades' halls
Amidst thy fellow-thralls
No friendly shade thy shade shall company!


(The end)
Thomas Hardy's poem: Sapphic Fragment

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