Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomePoemsOf Cato
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
Of Cato Post by :The_Anik Category :Poems Author :Richard Lovelace Date :October 2011 Read :1552

Click below to download : Of Cato (Format : PDF)

Of Cato

DE CATONE.

Invictus victis in partibus omnia Caesar
Vincere qui potuit, te, Cato, non potuit.


OF CATO.

The world orecome, victorious Caesar, he
That conquer'd all, great Cato, could not thee.


--------

ITEM.

Ictu non potuit primo Cato solvere vitam;
Defecit tanto vulnere victa manus:
Altius inseruit digitos, qua spiritus ingens
Exiret, magnum dextera fecit iter.
Opposuit fortuna moram, involvitque, Catonis
Scires ut ferro plus valuisse manum.

ANOTHER.

One stabbe could not fierce Cato's<1> life unty;
Onely his hand of all that wound did dy.
Deeper his fingers tear to make a way
Open, through which his mighty soul might stray.
Fortune made this delay to let us know,
That Cato's hand more then his sword could do.


---------

ITEM.

Dextera, quid dubitas? durum est jugulare Catonem;
Sed modo liber erit: jam puto non dubitas!
Fas non est vivo quenquam servire Catone,
Nedum ipsum vincit nunc Cato si moritur.

ANOTHER.

What doubt'st thou, hand? sad Cato 'tis to kill;
But he'l be free: sure, hand, thou doubt'st not still!
Cato alive, 'tis just all men be free:
Nor conquers he himself, now if he die.

<1> Cato of Utica.

(The end)
Richard Lovelace's poem: Of Cato

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

Death: And A Derisive Chorus Death: And A Derisive Chorus

Death: And A Derisive Chorus
The door is shut. She leaves the curtained office, And down the grey-walled stairs comes trembling slowly Towards the dazzling street. Her withered hand clings tightly to the railing. The long stairs rise and fall beneath her feet. Here in the brilliant sun we jostle, waiting To tear her secret out . . . We laugh, we hurry, We go our way, revolving, sinister, slow. She blinks in
PREVIOUS BOOKS

De Scaevola De Scaevola

De Scaevola
DE SCAEVOLA.Lictorem pro rege necans nunc mutius ultro Sacrifico propriam concremat igne manum:Miratur Porsenna virum, paenamque relaxans Maxima cum obscessis faedera a victor init,Plus flammis patriae confert quam fortibus armis, Una domans bellum funere dextra sua. ENGLISHED.The hand, by which no king but serjeant dies,Mutius in fire doth freely sacrifice;The prince admires the Hero, quits his pains,And Victor from the seige peace entertains;Rome's more oblig'd to flames than arms or pow'r,When one burnt hand shall the whole war devour.Notes: A
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT