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Lux E Tenebris Post by :song_chengxiang Category :Poems Author :Maurice Hewlett Date :September 2011 Read :670

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Lux E Tenebris

I thank all Gods that I can let thee go,
Lady, without one thought, one base desire
To tarnish that clear vision I gained by fire,
One stain in me I would not have thee know.
That is great might indeed that moves me so
To look upon thy Form, and yet aspire
To look not there, rather than I should mire
That winged Spirit that haunts and guards thy brow.

So now I see thee go, secure in this
That what I have is thee, that whole of thee
Whereof thy fair infashioning is sign:
For I see Honour, Love, and Wholesomeness,
And striving ever to reach them, and to be
As they, I keep thee still; for they are thine.





(The end)
Maurice Hewlett's poem: Lux E Tenebris

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