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Louis Napoleon Louis Napoleon

Louis Napoleon
Eagle of Austerlitz! where were thy wingsWhen far away upon a barbarous strand,In fight unequal, by an obscure hand,Fell the last scion of thy brood of Kings!Poor boy! thou shalt not flaunt thy cloak of red,Or ride in state through Paris in the vanOf thy returning legions, but insteadThy mother France, free and republican,Shall on thy dead and crownless forehead placeThe better laurels of a soldier's crown,That not dishonoured should thy soul go downTo tell the mighty Sire of thy raceThat France hath kissed the mouth of Liberty,And found it sweeter than his honied bees,And that the giant wave DemocracyBreaks on... Poems - Post by : shish1 - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 3241

To Milton To Milton

To Milton
Milton! I think thy spirit hath passed awayFrom these white cliffs and high-embattled towers;This gorgeous fiery-coloured world of oursSeems fallen into ashes dull and grey,And the age changed unto a mimic playWherein we waste our else too-crowded hours:For all our pomp and pageantry and powersWe are but fit to delve the common clay,Seeing this little isle on which we stand,This England, this sea-lion of the sea,By ignorant demagogues is held in fee,Who love her not: Dear God! is this the landWhich bare a triple empire in her handWhen Cromwell spake the word Democracy!_________ The EndTo n, a poem by... Poems - Post by : imported_n/a - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 942

Ave Imperatrix Ave Imperatrix

Ave Imperatrix
Set in this stormy Northern sea,Queen of these restless fields of tide,England! what shall men say of thee,Before whose feet the worlds divide?The earth, a brittle globe of glass,Lies in the hollow of thy hand,And through its heart of crystal pass,Like shadows through a twilight land,The spears of crimson-suited war,The long white-crested waves of fight,And all the deadly fires which areThe torches of the lords of Night.The yellow leopards, strained and lean,The treacherous Russian knows so well,With gaping blackened jaws are seenLeap through the hail of screaming shell.The strong sea-lion of England's warsHath left his sapphire cave of sea,To battle with... Poems - Post by : Safari - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2673

Sonnet To Liberty Sonnet To Liberty

Sonnet To Liberty
Not that I love thy children, whose dull eyesSee nothing save their own unlovely woe,Whose minds know nothing, nothing care to know,--But that the roar of thy Democracies,Thy reigns of Terror, thy great Anarchies,Mirror my wildest passions like the seaAnd give my rage a brother--! Liberty!For this sake only do thy dissonant criesDelight my discreet soul, else might all kingsBy bloody knout or treacherous cannonadesRob nations of their rights inviolateAnd I remain unmoved--and yet, and yet,These Christs that die upon the barricades,God knows it I am with them, in some things._________ The EndOscar Wilde's poem: Sonnet To Liberty... Poems - Post by : merlins - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2820

Helas! Helas!

Helas!
To drift with every passion till my soulIs a stringed lute on which can winds can play,Is it for this that I have given awayMine ancient wisdom and austere control?Methinks my life is a twice-written scrollScrawled over on some boyish holidayWith idle songs for pipe and virelay,Which do but mar the secret of the whole.Surely there was a time I might have trodThe sunlit heights, and from life's dissonanceStruck one clear chord to reach the ears of God:Is that time dead? lo! with a little rodI did but touch the honey of romance--And must I lose a soul's inheritance?_________ The EndOscar... Poems - Post by : rameses - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1586

The Raven The Raven

The Raven
Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore--While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door."'Tis some visiter," I muttered, "tapping at my chamber door-- Only this and nothing more."Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the... Poems - Post by : ggwan - Date : October 2009 - Author : Edgar Allan Poe - Read : 1993

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 141 To Sonnet 154 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 141 To Sonnet 154

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 141 To Sonnet 154
CXLI (Sonnet 141)In faith I do not love thee with mine eyes, For they in thee a thousand errors note;But 'tis my heart that loves what they despise,Who, in despite of view, is pleased to dote.Nor are mine ears with thy tongue's tune delighted;Nor tender feeling, to base touches prone,Nor taste, nor smell, desire to be invitedTo any sensual feast with thee alone:But my five wits nor my five senses canDissuade one foolish heart from serving thee,Who leaves unsway'd the likeness of a man,Thy proud heart's slave and vassal wretch to be: Only my plague thus far I count my... Poems - Post by : Shawn_W. - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1590

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 121 To Sonnet 140 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 121 To Sonnet 140

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 121 To Sonnet 140
CXXI (Sonnet 121)'Tis better to be vile than vile esteem'd,When not to be receives reproach of being;And the just pleasure lost, which is so deem'dNot by our feeling, but by others' seeing:For why should others' false adulterate eyesGive salutation to my sportive blood?Or on my frailties why are frailer spies,Which in their wills count bad what I think good?No, I am that I am, and they that levelAt my abuses reckon up their own:I may be straight though they themselves be bevel;By their rank thoughts, my deeds must not be shown; Unless this general evil they maintain, All men... Poems - Post by : lucie101 - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 778

Lady Clare Lady Clare

Lady Clare
It was the time when lilies blow,And clouds are highest up in air.Lord Ronald brought a lily-white doeTo give his cousin, Lady Clare.I trow they did not part in scorn:Lovers long betrothed were they;They two will wed the morrow morn;God's blessing on the day!"He does not love me for my birthNor for my lands so broad and fair;He loves me for my own true worth,And that is well," said Lady Clare.In there came old Alice the nurse,Said, "Who was this that went from thee?""s my cousin," said Lady Clare;"To-morrow he weds with me.""Oh, God be thanked!" said Alice the nurse,"That all... Poems - Post by : clivejive - Date : October 2009 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 977

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 81 To Sonnet 100 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 81 To Sonnet 100

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 81 To Sonnet 100
LXXXI (Sonnet 81)Or I shall live your epitaph to make,Or you survive when I in earth am rotten;From hence your memory death cannot take,Although in me each part will be forgotten.Your name from hence immortal life shall have,Though I, once gone, to all the world must die:The earth can yield me but a common grave,When you entombed in men's eyes shall lie.Your monument shall be my gentle verse,Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read;And tongues to be, your being shall rehearse,When all the breathers of this world are dead; You still shall live,--such virtue hath my pen,-- Where breath... Poems - Post by : rgunnltd - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1036

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 61 To Sonnet 80 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 61 To Sonnet 80

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 61 To Sonnet 80
LXI (Sonnet 61)Is it thy will, thy image should keep openMy heavy eyelids to the weary night?Dost thou desire my slumbers should be broken,While shadows like to thee do mock my sight?Is it thy spirit that thou send'st from theeSo far from home into my deeds to pry,To find out shames and idle hours in me,The scope and tenure of thy jealousy?O, no! thy love, though much, is not so great:It is my love that keeps mine eye awake:Mine own true love that doth my rest defeat,To play the watchman ever for thy sake: For thee watch I, whilst thou... Poems - Post by : 36411 - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 656

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 41 To Sonnet 60 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 41 To Sonnet 60

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 41 To Sonnet 60
XLI (Sonnet 41)Those pretty wrongs that liberty commits,When I am sometime absent from thy heart,Thy beauty, and thy years full well befits,For still temptation follows where thou art.Gentle thou art, and therefore to be won,Beauteous thou art, therefore to be assail'd;And when a woman woos, what woman's sonWill sourly leave her till he have prevail'd?Ay me! but yet thou mightst my seat forbear,And chide thy beauty and thy straying youth,Who lead thee in their riot even thereWhere thou art forced to break a twofold truth:-- Hers by thy beauty tempting her to thee, Thine by thy beauty being false... Poems - Post by : mattyk23 - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1020

The Last Tournament The Last Tournament

The Last Tournament
Dagonet, the fool, whom Gawain in his moods Had made mock-knight of Arthur's Table Round, At Camelot, high above the yellowing woods, Danced like a wither'd leaf before the Hall. And toward him from the Hall, with harp in hand, And from the crown thereof a carcanet Of ruby swaying to and fro, the prize Of Tristram in the jousts of yesterday, Came Tristram, saying, "Why skip ye so, Sir Fool?" For Arthur and Sir Lancelot riding once Far down beneath a winding wall of rock Heard a child wail. A stump of oak half-dead, From roots like some... Poems - Post by : QuantumSoul - Date : October 2009 - Author : Alfred Lord Tennyson - Read : 708

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 21 To Sonnet 40 Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 21 To Sonnet 40

Shakespeare's Sonnets: Sonnet 21 To Sonnet 40
XXI (Sonnet 21)So is it not with me as with that Muse,Stirr'd by a painted beauty to his verse,Who heaven itself for ornament doth useAnd every fair with his fair doth rehearse,Making a couplement of proud compare'With sun and moon, with earth and sea's rich gems,With April's first-born flowers, and all things rare,That heaven's air in this huge rondure hems.O! let me, true in love, but truly write,And then believe me, my love is as fairAs any mother's child, though not so brightAs those gold candles fix'd in heaven's air: Let them say more that like of hearsay well;... Poems - Post by : websitejack - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1010

A Lover's Complaint A Lover's Complaint

A Lover's Complaint
From off a hill whose concave womb re-wordedA plaintful story from a sistering vale,My spirits to attend this double voice accorded,And down I laid to list the sad-tun'd tale;Ere long espied a fickle maid full pale,Tearing of papers, breaking rings a-twain,Storming her world with sorrow's wind and rain.Upon her head a platted hive of straw,Which fortified her visage from the sun,Whereon the thought might think sometime it sawThe carcase of a beauty spent and done.Time had not scythed all that youth begun,Nor youth all quit; but, spite of Heaven's fell rageSome beauty peeped through lattice of sear'd age.Oft did she heave... Poems - Post by : mrushing - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 791

The Rape Of Lucrece The Rape Of Lucrece

The Rape Of Lucrece
TO THERIGHT HONOURABLE HENRY WRIOTHESLY,EARL OF SOUTHHAMPTON, AND BARON OF TICHFIELD.THE love I dedicate to your lordship is without end; whereof this pamphlet, without beginning, is but a superfluous moiety. The warrant I have of your honourable disposition, not the worth of my untutored lines, makes it assured of acceptance. What I have done is yours; what I have to do is yours; being part in all I have, devoted yours. Were my worth greater, my duty would show greater; meantime, as it is, it is bound to your lordship, to whom I wish long life, still lengthened with all happiness.Your... Poems - Post by : twistedpixel - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1402

The Phoenix And The Turtle The Phoenix And The Turtle

The Phoenix And The Turtle
Let the bird of loudest lay,On the sole Arabian tree,Herald sad and trumpet be,To whose sound chaste wings obey.But thou, shrieking harbinger,Foul pre-currer of the fiend,Augur of the fever's end,To this troop come thou not near.From this session interdictEvery fowl of tyrant wing,Save the eagle, feather'd king:Keep the obsequy so strict.he priest in surplice white,That defunctive music can,Be the death-defying swan,Lest the requiem lack his right.And thou, treble-dated crow,That thy sable gender mak'stWith the breath thou giv'st and tak'st,'Mongst our mourners shalt thou go.Here the anthem doth commence:Love and constancy is dead;Phoenix and the turtle fledIn a mutual flame from hence.So... Poems - Post by : Mike_Barcus - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 1553

Venus And Adonis Venus And Adonis

Venus And Adonis
'Villa miretur vulgus; mihi flavus ApolloPocula Castalia plena ministret aqua.'TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE HENRY WRIOTHESLEY,EARL OF SOUHAMPTON, AND BARON OF TICHFIELD.RIGHT HONOURABLE,I know not how I shall offend in dedicating my unpolished lines to your lordship, nor how the world will censure me for choosing so strong a prop to support so weak a burthen: only, if your honour seem but pleased, I account myself highly praised, and vow To take advantage of all idle hours, till I have honoured you with some graver labour. But if the first heir of my invention prove deformed, I shall be sorry it had... Poems - Post by : mjsimpson - Date : October 2009 - Author : William Shakespeare - Read : 2384