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Full Online Book HomePoemsFrom "of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies": Translated From Plutarch
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From 'of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies': Translated From Plutarch Post by :waazgmans Category :Poems Author :Henry Vaughan Date :October 2011 Read :3974

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From "of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies": Translated From Plutarch

1651

1. (HOMER. ILIAD, I. 255-6.)

Sure Priam will to mirth incline,
And all that are of Priam's line.

 

2. (AESCHYLUS. SEPTEM CONTRA THEBES, 600-1.)

Feeding on fruits which in the heavens do grow,
Whence all divine and holy counsels flow.

 

3. (EURIPIDES. ORESTES, 251-2.)

Excel then if thou canst, be not withstood,
But strive and overcome the evil with good.

 

4. (EURIPIDES. FRAGM. MLXXI.)

You minister to others' wounds a cure,
But leave your own all rotten and impure.

 

5. (EURIPIDES. CRESPHONTES, FRAGM. CCCCLV.)

Chance, taking from me things of highest price,
At a dear rate hath taught me to be wise.

 

6. (INCERTI.)

(He) Knaves' tongues and calumnies no more doth prize
Than the vain buzzing of so many flies.

 

7. (PINDAR. FRAGM. C.)

His deep, dark heart--bent to supplant--
Is iron, or else adamant.

 

8. (SOLON. FRAGM. XV.)

What though they boast their riches unto us?
Those cannot say that they are virtuous.


(The end)
Henry Vaughan's poem: From "Of The Benefit We May Get By Our Enemies": Translated From Plutarch

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