Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomePoemsFrom A "discourse Of Life And Death": Translated From Nierembergius
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
From A 'discourse Of Life And Death': Translated From Nierembergius Post by :PlayersGolf Category :Poems Author :Henry Vaughan Date :October 2011 Read :995

Click below to download : From A "discourse Of Life And Death": Translated From Nierembergius (Format : PDF)

From A "discourse Of Life And Death": Translated From Nierembergius

1654.


1. (INCERTI.)

Whose hissings fright all Nature's monstrous ills;
His eye darts death, more swift than poison kills.
All monsters by instinct to him give place,
They fly for life, for death lives in his face;
And he alone by Nature's hid commands
Reigns paramount, and prince of all the sands.

 

2. (INCERTI.)

The plenteous evils of frail life fill the old:
Their wasted limbs the loose skin in dry folds
Doth hang about: their joints are numb'd, and through
Their veins, not blood, but rheums and waters flow.
Their trembling bodies with a staff they stay,
Nor do they breathe, but sadly sigh all day.
Thoughts tire their hearts, to them their very mind
Is a disease; their eyes no sleep can find.

 

3. (MIMNERMUS.)

Against the virtuous man we all make head,
And hate him while he lives, but praise him dead.

 

4. (INCERTI.)

Long life, oppress'd with many woes,
Meets more, the further still it goes.

 

5. (JUVENAL. SATIRE X. 278-286.)

What greater good had deck'd great Pompey's crown
Than death, if in his honours fully blown,
And mature glories he had died? those piles
Of huge success, loud fame, and lofty styles
Built in his active youth, long lazy life
Saw quite demolish'd by ambitious strife.
He lived to wear the weak and melting snow
Of luckless age, where garlands seldom grow,
But by repining Fate torn from the head
Which wore them once, are on another shed.

 

6. (MENANDER. FRAGM. CXXVIII.)

Whom God doth take care for, and love,
He dies young here, to live above.

 

7. (INCERTI.)

Sickness and death, you are but sluggish things,
And cannot reach a heart that hath got wings.


(The end)
Henry Vaughan's poem: From A "Discourse Of Life And Death": Translated From Nierembergius

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

Aedh Tells Of The Perfect Beauty Aedh Tells Of The Perfect Beauty

Aedh Tells Of The Perfect Beauty
O cloud-pale eyelids, dream-dimmed eyes The poets labouring all their days To build a perfect beauty in rhyme Are overthrown by a woman's gaze And by the unlabouring brood of the skies: And therefore my heart will bow, when dew Is dropping sleep, until God burn time, Before the unlabouring stars and you.(The end)William Butler Yeats's poem: Aedh Tells Of The Perfect Beauty
PREVIOUS BOOKS

Aedh Tells Of A Valley Full Of Lovers Aedh Tells Of A Valley Full Of Lovers

Aedh Tells Of A Valley Full Of Lovers
I dreamed that I stood in a valley, and amid sighs, For happy lovers passed two by two where I stood; And I dreamed my lost love came stealthily out of the wood With her cloud-pale eyelids falling on dream-dimmed eyes: I cried in my dream 'O women bid the young men lay 'Their heads on your knees, and drown their eyes with your hair, 'Or remembering hers they will find no other face fair 'Till all the valleys of
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT