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Fragment On Painters Post by :Jim_Symonds Category :Poems Author :Rupert Brooke Date :July 2011 Read :3380

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Fragment On Painters

There is an evil which that Race attaints
Who represent God's World with oily paints,
Who mock the Universe, so rare and sweet,
With spots of colour on a canvas sheet,
Defile the Lovely and insult the Good
By scrawling upon little bits of wood.
They'd snare the moon, and catch the immortal sun
With madder brown and pale vermilion,
Entrap an English evening's magic hush . . .

(The end)
Rupert Brooke's poem: Fragment On Painters

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