Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomePoemsDay's Parlor
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
Day's Parlor Post by :keymaster Category :Poems Author :Emily Dickinson Date :May 2011 Read :1873

Click below to download : Day's Parlor (Format : PDF)

Day's Parlor

The day came slow, till five o'clock,
Then sprang before the hills
Like hindered rubies, or the light
A sudden musket spills.

The purple could not keep the east,
The sunrise shook from fold,
Like breadths of topaz, packed a night,
The lady just unrolled.

The happy winds their timbrels took;
The birds, in docile rows,
Arranged themselves around their prince
(The wind is prince of those).

The orchard sparkled like a Jew, --
How mighty 't was, to stay
A guest in this stupendous place,
The parlor of the day!




(The end)
Emily Dickinson's poem: Day's Parlor

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

The Sun's Wooing The Sun's Wooing

The Sun's Wooing
The sun just touched the morning;The morning, happy thing,Supposed that he had come to dwell,And life would be all spring.She felt herself supremer, --A raised, ethereal thing;Henceforth for her what holiday!Meanwhile, her wheeling kingTrailed slow along the orchardsHis haughty, spangled hems,Leaving a new necessity, --The want of diadems!The morning fluttered, staggered,Felt feebly for her crown, --Her unanointed foreheadHenceforth her only one.(The end)Emily Dickinson's poem: Sun's Wooing
PREVIOUS BOOKS

At Half-past Three A Single Bird At Half-past Three A Single Bird

At Half-past Three A Single Bird
At half-past three a single birdUnto a silent skyPropounded but a single termOf cautious melody.At half-past four, experimentHad subjugated test,And lo! her silver principleSupplanted all the rest.At half-past seven, elementNor implement was seen,And place was where the presence was,Circumference between.(The end)Emily Dickinson's poem: At Half-Past Three A Single Bird
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT