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Bowles And Campbell Post by :paul_lee Category :Poems Author :Lord Byron Date :August 2011 Read :1275

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Bowles And Campbell

To the air of "How now, Madam Flirt," in the _Beggar's Opera_.(1)


BOWLES.

"WHY, how now, saucy Tom?
If you thus must ramble,
I will publish some
Remarks on Mister Campbell.
Saucy Tom!"


CAMPBELL.

"WHY, how now, Billy Bowles?
Sure the priest is maudlin!
(_To the public_) How can you, d--n your souls!
Listen to his twaddling?
_Billy Bowles_!"


February 22, 1821.


FOOTNOTES:

(1) (Compare the Beggar's Opera, act ii. sc. 2--

Air, "Good morrow, Gossip Joan."
"Polly. _Why, how now, Madam Flirt?
If you thus must chatter,
And are for flinging dirt,
Let's try who best can spatter,
Madam Flirt_!
"Lucy. _Why, how now, saucy jade?
Sure the wench is tipsy!
How can you see me made
The scoff of such a gipsy_? (To him.)
_Saucy jade_!" (To her.)

Bowles replied to Campbell's Introductory Essay to his _Specimens of the English Poets_, 7 vols., 1819, by _The Invariable Principles of Poetry_, in a letter addressed to Thomas Campbell. For Byron's two essays, the "Letter to.... (John Murray)" and "Observations upon Observations," see _Letters_, 1901, v. Appendix III. pp. 536-592.)


(The end)
Lord Byron's poem: Bowles And Campbell

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