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Wilhelm Tell - Act 3 Wilhelm Tell - Act 3

Wilhelm Tell - Act 3
ACT IIISCENE I.(Court before Tell's house. Tell with an axe. Hedwig engaged in her domestic duties. Walter and William in the background, playing with a little cross-bow.) (Walter sings)With his cross-bow, and his quiver, The huntsman speeds his way,Over mountain, dale and river, At the dawning of the day.As the eagle, on wild pinion, Is the king in realms of air,So the hunter claims dominion Over crag and forest lair.Far as ever bow can carry, Thro' the trackless airy space,All he sees he makes his quarry, Soaring bird and beast of chase.WILL. (runs... Plays - Post by : corbymorris - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2679

Wilhelm Tell - Act 2 Wilhelm Tell - Act 2

Wilhelm Tell - Act 2
ACT IISCENE I.The mansion of the Baron of Attinghausen. A Gothic Hall, decorated with escutcheons and helmets. The Baron, a grey-headed man, eighty- five years old, tall and of a commanding mien, clad in a furred pelisse, and leaning on a staff tipped with chamois horn. Kuoni and six hinds standing round him with rakes and scythes. Ulrich of Rudenz enters in the costume of a knight.RUD. Uncle, I'm here! Your will?ATTING. First let me share,After the ancient custom of our house,The morning cup, with these my faithful servants!(He drinks from a cup, which is then passed round.)Time was, I stood... Plays - Post by : corbymorris - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 3517

Wilhelm Tell - Act 1 Wilhelm Tell - Act 1

Wilhelm Tell - Act 1
ACT ISCENE I.A high rocky shore of the Lake of Lucerne opposite Schwytz. The lake makes a bend into the land; a hut stands at a short distance from the shore; the fisher boy is rowing about in his boat. Beyond the lake are seen the green meadows, the hamlets and farms of Schwytz, lying in the clear sunshine. On the left are observed the peaks of The Hacken, surrounded with clouds; to the right, and in the remote distance, appear the Glaciers. The Ranz des Vaches, and the tinkling of cattle bells, continue for some time after the rising of... Plays - Post by : corbymorris - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1352

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 4 The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 4

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 4
ACT IV(SCENE I.--Rural scenery in the neighborhood of CHARLES VON MOOR'S castle.) (CHARLES VON MOOR, KOSINSKY, at a distance.) CHARLES. Go forward, and announce me. You remember what you have to say? KOSINSKY. You are Count Brand, you come from Mecklenburg. I am your groom. Do not fear, I shall take care to play my part. Farewell! (Exit.) CHARLES. Hail to thee, Earth of my Fatherland (kisses the earth.) Heaven of my Fatherland! Sun of my Fatherland! Ye meadows and hills, ye streams and woods! Hail, hail to ye all! How deliciously the breezes are wafted from my native hills? What... Plays - Post by : chenorae - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1112

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 3 The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 3

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 3
ACT IIISCENE I.--AMELIA in the garden, playing the guitar. Bright as an angel from Walhalla's hall, More beautiful than aught of earth was he! Heaven-mild his look, as sunbeams when they fall, Reflected from a calm cerulean sea. His warm embrace--oh, ravishing delight! With heart to heart the fiery pulses danced-- Our every sense wrap'd in ecstatic night-- Our souls in blissful harmony entranced.... Plays - Post by : chenorae - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1181

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 2 The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 2

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 2
ACT IISCENE I.--FRANCIS VON MOOR in his chamber--in meditation. FRANCIS. It lasts too long-and the doctor even says is recovering--an old man's life is a very eternity! The course would be free and plain before me, but for this troublesome, tough lump of flesh, which, like the infernal demon-hound in ghost stories, bars the way to my treasures. Must, then, my projects bend to the iron yoke of a mechanical system? Is my soaring spirit to be chained down to the snail's pace of matter? To blow out a wick which is already flickering upon its last drop of oil--'tis nothing... Plays - Post by : chenorae - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2568

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 1 The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 1

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Act 1
ACT ISCENE I.--Franconia. (Apartment in the Castle of COUNT MOOR.) (FRANCIS, OLD MOOR.) FRANCIS. But are you really well, father? You look so pale. OLD MOOR. Quite well, my son--what have you to tell me? FRANCIS. The post is arrived--a letter from our correspondent at Leipsic. OLD M. (eagerly). Any tidings of my son Charles? FRANCIS. Hem! Hem!--Why, yes. But I fear--I know not--whether I dare --your health.--Are you really quite well, father? OLD M. As a fish in water.* Does he write of my son? What means this anxiety about my health? You have asked me that question twice. (*This... Plays - Post by : chenorae - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2646

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Dramatis Personae The Robbers: A Tragedy - Dramatis Personae

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Dramatis Personae
"Quae medicamenta non sanant, ferrum sanat; quae ferrum nonsanat, ignis sanat."--HIPPOCRATES.MAXIMILIAN, COUNT VON MOOR. CHARLES, his Son.FRANCIS, his Son.AMELIA VON EDELREICH, his Niece. SPIEGELBERG,|SCHWEITZER, |GRIMM, |RAZMANN, | Libertines, afterwards BandittiSCHUFTERLE, |ROLLER, |KOSINSKY, |SCHWARTZ, |HERMANN, the natural son of a Nobleman.DANIEL, an old Servant of Count von Moor.PASTOR MOSER. FATHER DOMINIC, a Monk.BAND OF ROBBERS, SERVANTS, ETC.The scene is laid in Germany. Period of action about two years.... Plays - Post by : AndyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1789

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Schiller's Preface The Robbers: A Tragedy - Schiller's Preface

The Robbers: A Tragedy - Schiller's Preface
AS PREFIXED TO THE FIRST EDITION OF THE ROBBERS PUBLISHED IN 1781. Now first translated into English. This play is to be regarded merely as a dramatic narrative in which, for the purpose of tracing out the innermost workings of the soul, advantage has been taken of the dramatic method, without otherwise conforming to the stringent rules of theatrical composition, or seeking the dubious advantage of stage adaptation. It must be admitted as somewhat inconsistent that three very remarkable people, whose acts are dependent on perhaps a thousand contingencies, should be completely developed within three hours, considering that it would scarcely... Plays - Post by : AndyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 3610

The Camp Of Wallenstein - Act 1 The Camp Of Wallenstein - Act 1

The Camp Of Wallenstein - Act 1
ACT ISCENE I.(Sutlers' tents--in front, a Slop-shop. Soldiers of all colors and uniforms thronging about. Tables all filled. Croats and Hulans cooking at a fire. Sutler-woman serving out wine. Soldier-boys throwing dice on a drum-head. Singing heard from the tent.)(Enter a Peasant and his Son.)SON. Father, I fear it will come to harm,So let us be off from this soldier swarm;But boist'rous mates will ye find in the shoal--'Twere better to bolt while our skins are whole.FATHER. How now, boy! the fellows wont eat us, thoughThey may be a little unruly, or so.See, yonder, arriving a stranger train,Fresh comers are they... Plays - Post by : AndyW - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1418

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 5 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 5

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 5
ACT V - SCENE VSCENE V. -- A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE. (ENTER MACILENTE AND DELIRO.) MACI. Tut, sir, you did bear too hard a conceit of me in that; but I will not make my love to you most transparent, in spite of any dust of suspicion that may be raised to cloud it; and henceforth, since I see it is so against your humour, I will never labour to persuade you. DELI. Why, I thank you, signior; but what is that you tell me may concern my peace so much? MACI. Faith, sir, 'tist hus. Your wife's brother,... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 821

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 4 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 4

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 4
ACT V - SCENE IVSCENE IV. -- A ROOM AT THE MITRE. (ENTER CARLO.) CAR. Holla! where be these shot-sharks? (ENTER DRAWER.) DRAW. By and by; you are welcome, good master Buffone. CAR.Where's George? call me George hither, quickly. DRAW. What wine please you have, sir? I'll draw you that's neat, master Buffone. CAR.Away, neophite, do as I bid thee, bring my dear George to me: -- (ENTER GEORGE.) Mass, here he comes. GEORGE.Welcome, master Carlo. CAR.What, is supper ready, George? GEORGE.Ay, sir, almost: Will you have the cloth laid, master Carlo? CAR.O, what else? Are... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3165

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 3 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 3

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 3
ACT V - SCENE IIISCENE III. -- THE PALACE STAIRS. (ENTER SHIFT.) SHIFT. I am come to the court, to meet with my Countenance, Sogliardo; poor men must be glad of such countenance, when they can get no better. Well, need may insult upon a man, but it shall never make him despair of consequence. The world will say, 'tis base: tush, base! 'tis base to live under the earth, not base to live above it by any means. (ENTER FASTIDIOUS, PUNTARVOLO, SOGLIARDO, FUNGOSO, AND MACILENTE.) FAST. The poor lady is most miserably out of her humour, i'faith.... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2363

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 2 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 2

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 2
ACT V - SCENE IISCENE II. -- AN APARTMENT IN THE PALACE. (ENTER SAVIOLINA, PUNTARVOLO, FASTIDIOUS BRISK, AND FUNGOSO.) SAV.Why, I thought, sir Puntarvolo, you had been gone your voyage? PUNT.Dear and most amiable lady, your divine beauties do bind me to those offices, that I cannot depart when I would. SAV.'Tis most court-like spoken, sir; but how might we do to have a sight of your dog and cat? FAST.His dog is in the court, lady. SAV.And not your cat? how dare you trust her behind you, sir. PUNT. Troth, madam, she hath sore eyes, and she doth keep... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2856

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 5 - Scene 1
ACT V - SCENE ISCENE I. -- THE PALACE STAIRS. (ENTER PUNTARVOLO, WITH HIS DOG, FOLLOWED BY FASTIDIOUS BRISK AND FUNGOSO.) PUNT.Come, gentles, Signior, you are sufficiently instructed. FAST.Who, I, sir? PUNT.No, this gentleman. But stay, I take thought how to bestow my dog; he is no competent attendant for the presence. FAST.Mass, that's true, indeed, knight; you must not carry him into the presence. PUNT. I know it, and I, like a dull beast, forgot to bring one of my cormorants to attend me. FAST.Why, you were best leave him at the porter's lodge. PUNT. Not so; his worth... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2344

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 6 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 6

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 6
ACT IV - SCENE VISCENE VI. -- PUNTARVOLO'S LODGINGS. (ENTER PUNTARVOLO, FASTIDIOUS BRISK IN A NEW SUIT, AND SERVANTS WITH THE DOG.) PUNT.Well, now my whole venture is forth, I will resolve to depart shortly. FAST. Faith, sir Puntarvolo, go to the court, and take leave of the ladies first. PUNT.I care not, if it be this afternoon's labour. Where is Carlo? FAST.Here he comes. (ENTER CARLO, SOGLIARDO, SHIFT, AND MACILENTE.) CAR. Faith, gallants, I am persuading this gentleman (POINTS TO SOGLIARDO) to turn courtier. He is a man of fair revenue, and his estate will bear the charge... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3148

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 5 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 5

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 5
ACT IV - SCENE VSCENE V. -- A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE (ENTER FUNGOSO IN A NEW SUIT, FOLLOWED BY HIS TAILOR, SHOEMAKER, AND HABERDASHER.) FUNG. Gramercy, good shoemaker, I'll put to strings myself.. (EXIT SHOEMAKER.) -- Now, sir, let me see, what must you have for this hat? HABE. Here's the bill, sir. FUNG. How does it become me, well? TAI. Excellent, sir, as ever you had any hat in your life. FUNG. Nay, you'll say so all. HABE. In faith, sir, the hat's as good as any man in this town can serve you, and will maintain fashion as... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 1149

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 1 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 1

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 4 - Scene 1
ACT IV - SCENE ISCENE I. -- A ROOM IN DELIRO'S HOUSE. (ENTER FUNGOSO, FALLACE FOLLOWING HIM.) FAL. Why are you so melancholy, brother? FUNG. I am not melancholy, I thank you, sister. FAL. Why are you not merry then? there are but two of us in all the world, and if we should not be comforts one to another, God help us! FUNG. Faith, I cannot tell, sister; but if a man had any true melancholy in him, it would make him melancholy to see his yeomanly father cut his neighbours' throats, to make his son a gentleman; and... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 2364

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 3 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 3

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 3
ACT III - SCENE IIISCENE III. -- AN APARTMENT AT THE COURT (ENTER MACILENTE, FASTIDIOUS, BOTH IN A NEW SUIT, AND CINEDO, WITH TOBACCO.) FAST. Well, now signior Macilente, you are not only welcome to the court, but also to my mistress's withdrawing chamber -- Boy, get me some tobacco. I'll but go in, and shew I am here, and come to you presently, sir. (EXIT.) MACI. What's that he said? by heaven, I mark'd him not:My thoughts and I were of another world.I was admiring mine own outside here,To think what privilege and palm it bearsHere,... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 3637

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 2 Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 2

Every Man Out Of His Humour - Act 3 - Scene 2
ACT III - SCENE IISCENE II. -- THE COUNTRY. (ENTER SORDIDO, WITH A HALTER ABOUT HIS NECK.) SORD.Nay, God's precious, if the weather and season be so respectless, that beggars shall live as well as their betters; and that my hunger and thirst for riches shall not make them hunger and thirst with poverty; that my sleep shall be broken, and their hearts not broken; that my coffers shall be full, and yet care; their's empty, and yet merry; -- 'tis time that a cross should bear flesh and blood, since flesh and blood cannot bear this cross. MIT. What, will... Plays - Post by : Allnewe - Date : May 2012 - Author : Ben Jonson - Read : 1126