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Full Online Book HomePlaysThe Merry Wives Of Windsor - ACT V - SCENE I
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The Merry Wives Of Windsor - ACT V - SCENE I Post by :Rich_Holder Category :Plays Author :William Shakespeare Date :May 2011 Read :2605

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The Merry Wives Of Windsor - ACT V - SCENE I

ACT V. SCENE I.
The Garter Inn.

(Enter FALSTAFF and MISTRESS QUICKLY.)


FALSTAFF.
Prithee, no more prattling; go. I'll, hold. This is
the third time; I hope good luck lies in odd numbers.
Away, go; they say there is divinity in odd numbers, either
in nativity, chance, or death. Away.

QUICKLY.
I'll provide you a chain, and I'll do what I can to
get you a pair of horns.

FALSTAFF.
Away, I say; time wears; hold up your head, and mince.

(Exit MRS. QUICKLY)

(Enter FORD disguised.)

How now, Master Brook. Master Brook, the matter will
be known tonight or never. Be you in the Park about
midnight, at Herne's oak, and you shall see wonders.

FORD.
Went you not to her yesterday, sir,
as you told me you had appointed?

FALSTAFF.
I went to her, Master Brook, as you see, like a
poor old man; but I came from her, Master Brook, like a
poor old woman. That same knave Ford, her husband, hath
the finest mad devil of jealousy in him, Master Brook, that
ever govern'd frenzy. I will tell you-he beat me grievously
in the shape of a woman; for in the shape of man, Master
Brook, I fear not Goliath with a weaver's beam; because
I know also life is a shuttle. I am in haste; go along with
me; I'll. tell you all, Master Brook. Since I pluck'd geese,
play'd truant, and whipp'd top, I knew not what 'twas to
be beaten till lately. Follow me. I'll tell you strange things
of this knave-Ford, on whom to-night I will be revenged,
and I will deliver his wife into your hand. Follow. Strange
things in hand, Master Brook! Follow.


(Exeunt.)

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ACT V. SCENE II.Windsor Park.(Enter PAGE, SHALLOW, and SLENDER.)PAGE. Come, come; we'll couch i' th' Castle ditch till we see the light of our fairies. Remember, son Slender, my daughter.SLENDER. Ay, forsooth; I have spoke with her, and we have a nay-word how to know one another. I come to her in white and cry 'mum'; she cries 'budget,' and by that we know one another.SHALLOW. That's good too; but what needs either your mum or her budget? The white will decipher her well enough.
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