Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomePlaysThe Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 7. Paris. A Street Leading To The Tuileries
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 7. Paris. A Street Leading To The Tuileries Post by :wildflower_fan Category :Plays Author :Thomas Hardy Date :May 2012 Read :2697

Click below to download : The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 7. Paris. A Street Leading To The Tuileries (Format : PDF)

The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 7. Paris. A Street Leading To The Tuileries

PART FIRST. ACT SIXTH. SCENE VII.

(It is night, and the dim oil lamps reveal a vast concourse of citizens of both sexes around the Palace gates and in the neighbouring thoroughfares.)


SPIRIT OF THE YEARS (to the Spirit of Rumour)

Thou may'st descend and join this crowd awhile,
And speak what things shall come into they mouth.


SPIRIT SINISTER

I'll harken! I wouldn't miss it for the groans on another
Austerlitz!

(The Spirit of Rumour enters on the scene in the disguise of a
young foreigner.)


SPIRIT (to a street-woman)

Lady, a late hour this to be afoot!


WOMAN

Poor profit, then, to me from my true trade,
Wherein hot competition is so rife
Already, since these victories brought to town
So many foreign jobbers in my line,
That I'd best hold my tongue from praise of fame!
However, one is caught by popular zeal,
And though five midnights have not brought a sou,
I, too, chant _Jubilate like the rest.--

In courtesies have haughty monarchs vied
Towards the Conqueror! who, with men-at-arms
One quarter theirs, has vanquished by his nerve
Vast mustering four-hundred-thousand strong,
And given new tactics to the art of war
Unparalleled in Europe's history!


SPIRIT

What man is this, whose might thou blazonest so--
Who makes the earth to tremble, shakes old thrones,
And turns the plains to wilderness?


WOMAN

Dost ask
As ignorant, yet asking can define?
What mean you, traveller?


SPIRIT

I am a stranger here,
A wandering wight, whose life has not been spent
This side the globe, though I can speak the tongue.


WOMAN

Your air has truth in't; but your state is strange!
Had I a husband he should tackle thee.


SPIRIT

Dozens thou hast had--batches more than she
Samaria knew, if now thou hast not one!


WOMAN

Wilt take the situation from this hour?


SPIRIT

Thou know'st not what thy frailty asks, good dame!


WOMAN

Well, learn in small the Emperor's chronicle,
As gleaned from what my soldier-husbands say:--
some five-and-forty standards of his foes
Are brought to Paris, borne triumphantly
In proud procession through the surging streets,
Ever as brands of fame to shine aloft
In dim-lit senate-halls and city aisles.


SPIRIT

Fair Munich sparkled with festivity
As there awhile he tarried, and was met
By the gay Josephine your Empress here.--
There, too, Eugene--


WOMAN

Napoleon's stepson he---


SPIRIT

Received for gift the hand of fair Princess
Augusta (daughter of Bavaria's crown,
Forced from her plighted troth to Baden's heir),
And, to complete his honouring, was hailed
Successor to the throne of Italy.


WOMAN

How know you, ere this news has got abroad?


SPIRIT

Channels have I the common people lack.--
There, on the nonce, the forenamed Baden prince
Was joined to Stephanie Beauharnais, her
Who stands as daughter to the man we wait,
Some say as more.


WOMAN
They do? Then such not I.
Can revolution's dregs so soil thy soul
That thou shouldst doubt the eldest son thereof?
'Tis dangerous to insinuate nowadays!


SPIRIT

Right! Lady many-spoused, more charity
Upbrims in thee than in some loftier ones
Who would not name thee with their white-washed tongues.--
Enough. I am one whom, didst thou know my name,
Thou would'st not grudge a claim to speak his mind.


WOMAN

A thousand pardons, sir.


SPIRIT

Resume thy tale
If so thou wishest.


WOMAN

Nay, but you know best---


SPIRIT

How laurelled progress through applauding crowds
Have marked his journey home. How Strasburg town,
Stuttgart, Carlsruhe, acclaimed him like the rest:
How pageantry would here have welcomed him,
Had not his speed outstript intelligence
--Now will a glimpse of him repay thee. Hark!

(Shouts arise and increase in the distance, announcing BONAPARTE'S approach.)

Well, Buonaparte has revived by land,
But not by sea. On that thwart element
Never will he incorporate his dream,
And float as master!


WOMAN

What shall hinder him?


SPIRIT

That which has hereto. England, so to say.


WOMAN

But she's in straits. She lost her Nelson now,
(A worthy man: he loved a woman well!)
George drools and babbles in a darkened room;
Her heaven-born Minister declines apace;
All smooths the Emperor's sway.


SPIRIT

Tales have two sides,
Sweet lady. Vamped-up versions reach thee here.--
That Austerlitz was lustrous none ignores,
But would it shock thy garrulousness to know
That the true measure of this Trafalgar--
Utter defeat, ay, France's naval death--
Your Emperor bade be hid?


WOMAN

The seer's gift
Has never plenteously endowed me, sir,
As in appearance you. But to plain sense
Thing's seem as stated.


SPIRIT

We'll let seemings be.--
But know, these English take to liquid life
Right patly--nursed therefor in infancy
By rimes and rains which creep into their blood,
Till like seeks like. The sea is their dry land,
And, as on cobbles you, they wayfare there.


WOMAN

Heaven prosper, then, their watery wayfarings
If they'll leave us the land!--(The Imperial carriage appears.)
The Emperor!--
Long live the Emperor!--He's the best by land.

(BONAPARTE'S carriage arrives, without an escort. The street lamps shine in, and reveal the EMPRESS JOSEPHINE seated beside him. The plaudits of the people grow boisterous as they hail him Victor of Austerlitz. The more active run after the carriage, which turns in from the Rue St. Honore to the Carrousel, and thence vanishes into the Court of the Tuileries.)


WOMAN

May all success attend his next exploit!


SPIRIT

Namely: to put the knife in England's trade,
And teach her treaty-manners--if he can!


WOMAN

I like not your queer knowledge, creepy man.
There's weirdness in your air. I'd call you ghost
Had not the Goddess Reason laid all such
Past Mother Church's cunning to restore.
--Adieu. I'll not be yours to-night. I'd starve first!

(She withdraws. The crowd wastes away, and the Spirit vanishes.)

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 8. Putney. Bowling Green House The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 8. Putney. Bowling Green House

The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 8. Putney. Bowling Green House
PART FIRST. ACT SIXTH. SCENE VIII.(PITT'S bedchamber, from the landing without. It is afternoon. At the back of the room as seen through the doorway is a curtained bed, beside which a woman sits, the LADY HESTER STANHOPE. Bending over a table at the front of the room is SIR WALTER FARQUHAR, the physician. PARSLOW the footman and another servant are near the door. TOMLINE, the Bishop of Lincoln, enters.)FARQUHAR (in a subdued voice)I grieve to call your lordship up again,But symptoms lately have disclosed themselvesThat mean the knell to the frail life in him.And whatsoever thing of gravityIt may be
PREVIOUS BOOKS

The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 6. Shockerwick House, Near Bath The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 6. Shockerwick House, Near Bath

The Dynasts: An Epic Drama Of The War With Napoleon - Part 1 - Act 6 - Scene 6. Shockerwick House, Near Bath
PART FIRST. ACT SIXTH. SCENE VI. (The interior of the Picture Gallery. Enter WILTSHIRE, the owner, and Pitt, who looks emaciated and walks feebly.)WILTSHIRE (pointing to a portrait)Now here you have the lady we discussed:A fine example of his manner, sir?PITTIt is a fine example, sir, indeed,--With that transparency amid the shades,And those thin blue-green-grayish leafagesBehind the pillar in the background there,Which seem the leaves themselves.--Ah, this is Quin. (Moving to another picture.)WILTSHIREYes, Quin. A man of varied parts, though roughAnd choleric at times. Yet, at his best,As Falstaff, never matched, they say. But IHad not the fate to see him
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT