Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomePlaysJudas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE II - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; A MESSENGER
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
Judas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE II - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; A MESSENGER Post by :maxxswan Category :Plays Author :Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Date :June 2011 Read :2684

Click below to download : Judas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE II - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; A MESSENGER (Format : PDF)

Judas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE II - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; A MESSENGER

ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana: SCENE II - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; A MESSENGER


MESSENGER.
May the King live forever!

ANTIOCHUS.
Who art thou, and whence comest thou?

MESSENGER.
My Lord,
I am a messenger from Antioch,
Sent here by Lysias.

ANTIOCHUS.
A strange foreboding
Of something evil overshadows me.
I am no reader of the Jewish Scriptures;
I know not Hebrew; but my High-Priest Jason,
As I remember, told me of a Prophet
Who saw a little cloud rise from the sea
Like a man's hand and soon the heaven was black
With clouds and rain. Here, Philip, read; I cannot;
I see that cloud. It makes the letters dim
Before mine eyes.

PHILIP (reading).
"To King Antiochus,
The God, Epiphanes."

ANTIOCHUS.
O mockery!
Even Lysias laughs at me!--Go on, go on.

PHILIP (reading).
"We pray thee hasten thy return. The realm
Is falling from thee. Since thou hast gone from us
The victories of Judas Maccabaeus
Form all our annals. First he overthrew
Thy forces at Beth-horon, and passed on,
And took Jerusalem, the Holy City.
And then Emmaus fell; and then Bethsura;
Ephron and all the towns of Galaad,
And Maccabaeus marched to Carnion."

ANTIOCHUS.
Enough, enough! Go call my chariot-men;
We will drive forward, forward, without ceasing,
Until we come to Antioch. My captains,
My Lysias, Gorgias, Seron, and Nicanor,
Are babes in battle, and this dreadful Jew
Will rob me of my kingdom and my crown.
My elephants shall trample him to dust;
I will wipe out his nation, and will make
Jerusalem a common burying-place,
And every home within its walls a tomb!

(Throws up his hands, and sinks into the
arms of attendants, who lay him upon
a bank.)

PHILIP.
Antiochus! Antiochus! Alas,
The King is ill! What is it, O my Lord?

ANTIOCHUS.
Nothing. A sudden and sharp spasm of pain,
As if the lightning struck me, or the knife
Of an assassin smote me to the heart.
'T is passed, even as it came. Let us set forward.

PHILIP.
See that the chariots be in readiness
We will depart forthwith.

ANTIOCHUS.
A moment more.
I cannot stand. I am become at once
Weak as an infant. Ye will have to lead me.
Jove, or Jehovah, or whatever name
Thou wouldst be named,--it is alike to me,--
If I knew how to pray, I would entreat
To live a little longer.

PHILIP.
O my Lord,
Thou shalt not die; we will not let thee die!

ANTIOCHUS.
How canst thou help it, Philip? O the pain!
Stab after stab. Thou hast no shield against
This unseen weapon. God of Israel,
Since all the other gods abandon me,
Help me. I will release the Holy City.
Garnish with goodly gifts the Holy Temple.
Thy people, whom I judged to be unworthy
To be so much as buried, shall be equal
Unto the citizens of Antioch.
I will become a Jew, and will declare
Through all the world that is inhabited
The power of God!

PHILIP.
He faints. It is like death.
Bring here the royal litter. We will bear him
In to the camp, while yet he lives.

ANTIOCHUS.
O Philip,
Into what tribulation am I come!
Alas! I now remember all the evil
That I have done the Jews; and for this cause
These troubles are upon me, and behold
I perish through great grief in a strange land.

PHILIP.
Antiochus! my King!

ANTIOCHUS.
Nay, King no longer.
Take thou my royal robes, my signet-ring,
My crown and sceptre, and deliver them
Unto my son, Antiochus Eupator;
And unto the good Jews, my citizens,
In all my towns, say that their dying monarch
Wisheth them joy, prosperity, and health.
I who, puffed up with pride and arrogance,
Thought all the kingdoms of the earth mine own,
If I would but outstretch my hand and take them,
Meet face to face a greater potentate,
King Death--Epiphanes--the Illustrious!
(Dies.


*****

 

MICHAEL ANGELO

Michel, piu che mortal, Angel divino. -- ARIOSTO.

Similamente operando all' artista
ch' a l'abito dell' arte e man che trema. -- DANTE, Par. xiii.,
st. 77.

Content of ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana SCENE II - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; A MESSENGER
The End
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow's play/drama: Judas Maccabaeus

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - INTRODUCTORY NOTE A Blot In The 'scutcheon - INTRODUCTORY NOTE

A Blot In The 'scutcheon - INTRODUCTORY NOTE
INTRODUCTORY NOTEROBERT BROWNING stands, in respect to his origin and his career,in marked contrast to the two aristocratic poets beside whose dramashis "Blot in the 'Scutcheon" is here printed. His father was a bankclerk and a dissenter at a time when dissent meant exclusionfrom Society; the poet went neither to one of the great public schoolsnor to Oxford or Cambridge; and no breath of scandal touched his name.Born in London in 1812, he was educated largely by private tutors,and spent two years at London University, but the influence of hisfather, a man of wide reading and cultivated tastes, was probablythe
PREVIOUS BOOKS

Judas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE I - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; ATTENDANTS Judas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE I - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; ATTENDANTS

Judas Maccabaeus - ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana - SCENE I - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; ATTENDANTS
ACT V. The Mountains of Ecbatana: SCENE I - ANTIOCHUS; PHILIP; ATTENDANTS ANTIOCHUS.Here let us rest awhile. Where are we, Philip?What place is this?PHILIP.Ecbatana, my Lord;And yonder mountain range is the Orontes.ANTIOCHUS.The Orontes is my river at Antioch.Why did I leave it? Why have I been temptedBy coverings of gold and shields and breastplatesTo plunder Elymais, and be drivenFrom out its gates, as by a fiery blastOut of a furnace?PHILIP.These are fortune's changes.ANTIOCHUS.What a defeat it was! The Persian horsemenCame like a mighty wind, the wind Khamaseen,And melted us away, and scattered usAs if we were dead leaves, or
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT