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The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 2 The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 2

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 2
ACT I - SCENE IISCENE II.--A Butcher's Shop.(CUTLET. BEN.)CUTLETReach me down that book off the shelf the shoulder of veal hangs.BENIs this it?CUTLETNo--this is "Flowers of Sentiment"--the other--aye, this is a good book. "An Argument against the Use of Animal Food. By J.R." _That means Joseph Ritson. I will open it anywhere, and read just as it happens. One cannot dip amiss in such books as these. The motto, I see, is from Pope. I dare say, very much to the purpose. (Reads.) "The lamb thy riot dooms to bleed to-day,... Plays - Post by : mindout - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3083

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 1 The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 1

The Pawnbroker's Daughter, A Farce - Act 1 - Scene 1
ACT I - SCENE ISCENE I.--An Apartment at Flint's house.(FLINT. WILLIAM.)FLINTCarry those umbrellas, cottons, and wearing-apparel, up stairs. You may send that chest of tools to Robins's.WILLIAMThat which you lent six pounds upon to the journeyman carpenter that had the sick wife?FLINTThe same.WILLIAMThe man says, if you can give him till Thursday--FLINTNot a minute longer. His time was out yesterday. These improvident fools!WILLIAMThe finical gentleman has been here about the seal that was his grandfather's.FLINTHe cannot have it. Truly, our trade would be brought to a fine pass, if we were bound to humour the fancies of our customers. This man... Plays - Post by : mindout - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1404

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 5 John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 5

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 5
ACT V(JOHN WOODVIL)(_dressing_). JOHN How beautiful, (_handling his mourning_) And comely do these mourning garments shew! Sure Grief hath set his sacred impress here, To claim the world's respect! they note so feelingly By outward types the serious man within.-- Alas! what part or portion can I claim In all the decencies of virtuous sorrow, Which other mourners use? as namely, This black attire, abstraction from society,... Plays - Post by : ldjhns - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2441

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 2 John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 2

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 2
ACT II(SCENE.--An Apartment in Woodvil Hall.)(John Woodvil--alone.)(_Reading Parts of a Letter._)"When Love grows cold, and indifference has usurped upon oldEsteem, it is no marvel if the world begin to account _that dependence, which hitherto has been esteemed honorable shelter. The course I have taken (in leaving this house, not easily wroughtthereunto,) seemed to me best for the once-for-all releasing ofyourself (who in times past have deserved well of me) from thenow daily, and not-to-be-endured, tribute of forced love,and ill-dissembled reluctance of affection. "MARGARET." Gone! gone! my girl? so hasty, Margaret!... Plays - Post by : atisa - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3154

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 1 John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 1

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Act 1
ACT I(SCENE.--A Servants' Apartment in Woodvil Hall.) (Servants drinking--Time, the morning.) A Song by DANIEL"When the King enjoys his own again."PETERA delicate song. Where did'st learn it, fellow?DANIELEven there thou learnest thy oaths and thy politics--at our master's table.--Where else should a serving-man pick uphis poor accomplishments?MARTINWell spoken, Daniel. O rare Daniel!--his oaths and his politics!excellent!FRANCISAnd where did'st pick up thy knavery, Daniel?PETER That came to him by inheritance. His family have supplied the shire of Devon, time out of mind, with good thieves and bad... Plays - Post by : atisa - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1285

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Characters John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Characters

John Woodvil; A Tragedy - Characters
(1798-1802. Text of 1818) CHARACTERS SIR WALTER WOODVIL. JOHN. } SIMON. } his sons. LOVEL. } GRAY. } Pretended friends of John. SANDFORD. Sir Walter's old steward. MARGARET. Orphan ward of Sir Walter. FOUR GENTLEMEN. John's riotous companions. SERVANTS. SCENE--for the... Plays - Post by : mr.shih - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2700

Pippa Passes - Epilogue Pippa Passes - Epilogue

Pippa Passes - Epilogue
(SCENE.--PIPPA'S chamber again. She enters it.) The bee with his comb, The mouse at her dray, The grub in his tomb, While winter away; But the firefly and hedge-shrew and lobworm, I pray, 5 How fare they? Ha, ha, thanks for your counsel, my Zanze! (1) "Feast upon lampreys, quaff Breganze"-- The summer of life so easy to spend, And care for tomorrow so soon put away!... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2183

Pippa Passes - Scene 3. Evening Pippa Passes - Scene 3. Evening

Pippa Passes - Scene 3. Evening
SCENE III. EVENING(SCENE.--Inside the Turret on the Hill above Asolo. LUIGI and his Mother entering.) Mother. If there blew wind, you'd hear a long sigh, easing The utmost heaviness of music's heart. Luigi. Here in the archway? Mother. Oh, no, no--in farther, Where the echo is made, on the ridge. Luigi.... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2568

Pippa Passes - Interlude 2 Pippa Passes - Interlude 2

Pippa Passes - Interlude 2
INTERLUDE II(Talk by the way, while PIPPA is passing from Orcana to the Turret. Two or three of the Austrian Police loitering with BLUPHOCKS, an English vagabond, just in view of the Turret.) Bluphocks. So, that is your Pippa, the little girl who passed us singing? Well, your Bishop's Intendant's money shall be honestly earned:--now, don't make me that sour face because I bring the Bishop's name into the business; we know he can have nothing to do with such 5... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2770

Pippa Passes - Scene 2. Noon Pippa Passes - Scene 2. Noon

Pippa Passes - Scene 2. Noon
SCENE II. NOON(SCENE--_Over Orcana. The house of JULES, who crosses its threshold with PHENE: she is silent, on which JULES begins--) Do not die, Phene! I am yours now, you Are mine now; let fate reach me how she likes, If you'll not die: so, never die! Sit here-- My workroom's single seat. I over-lean This length of hair and lustrous front; they turn 5 Like an entire flower upward: eyes, lips, last Your chin--no,... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 1902

Pippa Passes - Interlude 1 Pippa Passes - Interlude 1

Pippa Passes - Interlude 1
INTERLUDE I(Talk by the way, while PIPPA is passing from the hillside to Orcana. Foreign Students of painting and sculpture, from Venice, assembled opposite the house of JULES, a young French statuary, at Possagno.) 1st Student. Attention! My own post is beneath this window, but the pomegranate clump yonder will hide three or four of you with a little squeezing, and Schramm and his pipe must lie flat in the balcony. Four, five--who's a defaulter? We want everybody, for Jules must not be... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 3479

Pippa Passes - Scene 1. Morning Pippa Passes - Scene 1. Morning

Pippa Passes - Scene 1. Morning
SCENE I. MORNING(SCENE.--Up the Hillside, inside the Shrub-house. LUCA'S wife, OTTIMA, and her paramour, the German SEBALD.) Sebald (_sings_). _Let the watching lids wink! Day's ablaze with eyes, think! Deep into the night, drink!_ Ottima. Night? Such may be your Rhineland nights, perhaps; But this blood-red beam through the shutter's chink 5... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2697

Pippa Passes - Introduction Pippa Passes - Introduction

Pippa Passes - Introduction
NEW YEAR'S DAY AT ASOLO IN THE TREVISAN (A)(SCENE.-_A large, mean, airy chamber. A girl, PIPPA,from the silk-mills, springing out of bed.) Day! Faster and more fast, O'er night's brim, day boils at last; Boils, pure gold, o'er the cloud-cup's brim Where spurting and suppressed it lay, 5 For not a froth-flake touched the rim Of yonder gap in the solid gray... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 999

Pippa Passes - Persons Pippa Passes - Persons

Pippa Passes - Persons
PIPPA. OTTIMA. SEBALD. Foreign Students. GOTTLIEB. SCHRAMM. JULES. PHENE. Austrian Police. BLUPHOCKS. LUIGI and his Mother. Poor Girls. MONSIGNOR and his Attendants.... Plays - Post by : scorpion - Date : May 2012 - Author : Robert Browning - Read : 2050

The Dance To Death - Act 5 The Dance To Death - Act 5

The Dance To Death - Act 5
ACT VSCENE I. (A Room in Susskind's House. LIEBHAID, CLAIRE, REUBEN.)LIEBHAID. The air hangs sultry as in mid-July. Look forth, Claire; moves not some big thundercloud Athwart the sky? My heart is sick.CLAIRE. Nay, Liebhaid. The clear May sun is shining, and the air Blows fresh and cordial from the budding hills.LIEBHAID. Reuben, what is 't o'clock. Our... Plays - Post by : eheyoka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Emma Lazarus - Read : 1465

The Dance To Death - Act 4 The Dance To Death - Act 4

The Dance To Death - Act 4
ACT IVSCENE I. (The City Hall at Nordhausen. Deputies and Burghers assembling. To the right, at a table near the President's chair, is seated the Public Scrivener. Enter DIETRICH VON TETTENBORN, and HENRY SCHNETZEN with an open letter in his hand.)SCHNETZEN. Didst hear the fellow's words who handed it? I asked from whom it came, he spoke by rote, "The pepper bites, the corn is ripe for harvest, I come from Eisenach." 'T is some tedious jest.TETTENBORN.... Plays - Post by : eheyoka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Emma Lazarus - Read : 893

The Dance To Death - Act 3 The Dance To Death - Act 3

The Dance To Death - Act 3
ACT III(A cell in the Wartburg Monastery. Enter PRIOR PEPPERCORN with the casket.)PRIOR. So! Glittering shell where doubtless shines concealed An orient treasure fit to bribe a king, Ransom a prince and buy him for a son. I have baptized thee now before the altar, Effaced the Jew's contaminating touch, And I am free to claim the Church's tithe From thy receptacle.(He is about to unlock the casket, when enters... Plays - Post by : eheyoka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Emma Lazarus - Read : 2934

The Dance To Death - Act 2 The Dance To Death - Act 2

The Dance To Death - Act 2
ACT IIAt Eisenach.SCENE I. (A Room in the LANDGRAVE'S Palace.FREDERICK THE GRAVE and HENRY SCHNETZEN.)LANDGRAVE. Who tells thee of my son's love for the Jewess?SCHNETZEN. Who tells me? Ask the Judengasse walls, The garrulous stones publish Prince William's visits To his fair mistress.LANDGRAVE. Mistress? Ah, such sins The Provost of St. George's will remit For half a... Plays - Post by : eheyoka - Date : May 2012 - Author : Emma Lazarus - Read : 2789

The Spagnoletto - Act 5 The Spagnoletto - Act 5

The Spagnoletto - Act 5
ACT VSCENE I. (A Room in DON TOMMASO'S House. ANNICCA discovered, attired in mourning. Enter DON TOMMASO.) DON TOMMASO. If he still live, now shall we hear of him. The news I learn will lure him from his covert, Where'er it lie, to pardon or avenge.ANNICCA (eagerly). What news? What cheer, Tommaso?DON TOMMASO. Meagre cheer, But tidings that break through our slow suspense, Like the first thunder-clap in sultry... Plays - Post by : winwayne - Date : May 2012 - Author : Emma Lazarus - Read : 2533

The Spagnoletto - Act 4 The Spagnoletto - Act 4

The Spagnoletto - Act 4
ACT IVSCENE I.(Night. RIBERA'S bedroom. RIBERA discovered in his dressing-gown, seated reading beside a table, with a light upon it. Enter from an open door at the back of the stage, MARIA. She stands irresolute for a moment on the threshold behind her father, watching him, passes her hand rapidly over her brow and eyes, and then knocks.) MARIA. May I come in, dear father?RIBERA (putting down his book and looking at her affectionately). Child, you ask? MARIA (advancing).You study late. I came to bid good-night.RIBERA. Poor child, thou must be weary. Thou art paleStill from thy... Plays - Post by : winwayne - Date : May 2012 - Author : Emma Lazarus - Read : 741