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Emily Bronte - Chapter 5. Going To School Emily Bronte - Chapter 5. Going To School

Emily Bronte - Chapter 5. Going To School
CHAPTER V. GOING TO SCHOOLEmily was now sixteen years old, and though the people in the village called her "t' cleverest o' t' Bronte childer," she had little to show of her cleverness. Her education was as home-made as her gowns, not such as would give distinction to a governess; and a governess Emily would have to be. The Bronte sisters were too severe and noble in their theories of life ever to contemplate marriage as a means of livelihood; but even worldly sisters would have owned that there was little chance of impatient Emily marrying at all. She was almost... Nonfictions - Post by : beetee - Date : May 2012 - Author : A. Mary F. Robinson - Read : 2799

Emily Bronte - Chapter 4. Childhood Emily Bronte - Chapter 4. Childhood

Emily Bronte - Chapter 4. Childhood
CHAPTER IV. CHILDHOODThe home to which Charlotte and Emily returned was not a very much more healthy spot than that they left; but it was home. It was windy and cold, and badly drained. Mr. Bronte was ever striving to stir up his parishioners to improve the sanitary conditions of the place; but for many years his efforts were in vain. The canny Yorkshire folk were loth to put their money underground, and it was hard to make them believe that the real cause of the frequent epidemics and fevers in Haworth was such as could be cured by an effective... Nonfictions - Post by : beetee - Date : May 2012 - Author : A. Mary F. Robinson - Read : 871

Emily Bronte - Chapter 3. Cowan's Bridge Emily Bronte - Chapter 3. Cowan's Bridge

Emily Bronte - Chapter 3. Cowan's Bridge
CHAPTER III. COWAN'S BRIDGE"It was in the year 1823 that the school for clergymen's daughters was first projected. The place was only then contemplated as desirable in itself, and as a place which might probably be feasible at some distant day. The mention of it, however, to only two friends in the South having met with their warm approbation and a remittance of L70, an opening seemed to be made for the commencement of the work. "With this sum in hand, in a reliance upon Him who has all hearts at his disposal, and to whom belong the silver and the... Nonfictions - Post by : beetee - Date : May 2012 - Author : A. Mary F. Robinson - Read : 3319

Emily Bronte - Chapter 2. Babyhood Emily Bronte - Chapter 2. Babyhood

Emily Bronte - Chapter 2. Babyhood
CHAPTER II. BABYHOODAfter his wife's death the Rev. Mr. Bronte's life grew yet more secluded from ordinary human interests. He was not intimate with his parishioners; scarcely more intimate with his children. He was proud of them when they said anything clever, for, in spite of their babyhood, he felt at such moments that they were worthy of their father; but their forlorn infancy, their helpless ignorance, was no appeal to his heart. Some months before his wife's death he had begun to take his dinner alone, on account of his delicate digestion; and he continued the habit, seeing the children... Nonfictions - Post by : beetee - Date : May 2012 - Author : A. Mary F. Robinson - Read : 3116

Emily Bronte - Chapter 1. Parentage Emily Bronte - Chapter 1. Parentage

Emily Bronte - Chapter 1. Parentage
CHAPTER I. PARENTAGEEmily Bronte was born of parents without any peculiar talent for literature. It is true that her mother's letters are precisely and prettily written. It is true that her father published a few tracts and religious poems. But in neither case is there any vestige of literary or poetical endowment. Few, indeed, are the Parish Magazines which could not show among their contents poems and articles greatly superior to the weak and characterless effusions of the father of the Brontes. The fact seems important; because in this case not one member of a family, but a whole family, is... Nonfictions - Post by : beetee - Date : May 2012 - Author : A. Mary F. Robinson - Read : 2739

Emily Bronte - Introduction Emily Bronte - Introduction

Emily Bronte - Introduction
There are, perhaps, few tests of excellence so sure as the popular verdict on a work of art a hundred years after its accomplishment. So much time must be allowed for the swing and rebound of taste, for the despoiling of tawdry splendours and to permit the work of art itself to form a public capable of appreciating it. Such marvellous fragments reach us of Elizabethan praises; and we cannot help recalling the number of copies of 'Prometheus Unbound' sold in the lifetime of the poet. We know too well "what porridge had John Keats," and remember with misgiving the turtle... Nonfictions - Post by : beetee - Date : May 2012 - Author : A. Mary F. Robinson - Read : 1642

The Song Of The Cardinal - Chapter 5. 'See here! See here!' demanded the Cardinal The Song Of The Cardinal - Chapter 5. "See here! See here!" demanded the Cardinal

The Song Of The Cardinal - Chapter 5. 'See here! See here!' demanded the Cardinal
The mandate repeatedly rang from the topmost twig of the thorn tree, and yet the Cardinal was not in earnest. He was beside himself with a new and delightful excitement, and he found it impossible to refrain from giving vent to his feelings. He was commanding the farmer and every furred and feathered denizen of the river bottom to see; then he fought like a wild thing if any of them ventured close, for great things were happening in the sumac. In past days the Cardinal had brooded an hour every morning while his mate went to take her... Nonfictions - Post by : prassociates - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gene Stratton-porter - Read : 2856

The Song Of The Cardinal - Chapter 1. 'Good cheer! Good cheer!' exulted the Cardinal The Song Of The Cardinal - Chapter 1. "Good cheer! Good cheer!" exulted the Cardinal

The Song Of The Cardinal - Chapter 1. 'Good cheer! Good cheer!' exulted the Cardinal
He darted through the orange orchard searching for slugs for his breakfast, and between whiles he rocked on the branches and rang over his message of encouragement to men. The song of the Cardinal was overflowing with joy, for this was his holiday, his playtime. The southern world was filled with brilliant sunshine, gaudy flowers, an abundance of fruit, myriads of insects, and never a thing to do except to bathe, feast, and be happy. No wonder his song was a prophecy of good cheer for the future, for happiness made up the whole of his past. The... Nonfictions - Post by : prassociates - Date : May 2012 - Author : Gene Stratton-porter - Read : 839

The Altar Fire - Part 13 The Altar Fire - Part 13

The Altar Fire - Part 13
April 3, 1891.A truth which has come home to me of late with a growing intensity is that we are sent into the world for the sake of experience, not necessarily for the sake of immediate happiness. I feel that the mistake we most of us make is in reaching out after a sense of satisfaction; and even if we learn to do without that, we find it very difficult to do without the sense of conscious growth. I say again that what we need and profit by is experience, and sometimes that comes by suffering, helpless, dreary, apparently meaningless suffering.... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1011

The Altar Fire - Part 9 The Altar Fire - Part 9

The Altar Fire - Part 9
July 8, 1889. I lose myself sometimes in a dream of misery in thinking of the baseness and meanness and squalor that condition the lives of so many of the poor. Not that it is not possible under those conditions to live lives of simplicity and dignity and beauty. It is perfectly possible, but only, I think, for strong natures possessing a combination of qualities--virtue, industry, sense, prudence, and above all good physical health. There must still be thousands of lives which could be happy and simple and virtuous under more secure conditions, which are marred and degraded by the influences... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2152

The Altar Fire - Part 8 The Altar Fire - Part 8

The Altar Fire - Part 8
June 14, 1889. It is comforting to reflect how easy it is to abandon habits, and how soon a new habit takes the place of the old. Some months ago I put writing aside in despair, feeling that I was turning away from the most stable thing in life; yet even now I have learned largely to acquiesce in silence; the dreary and objectless mood visits me less and less frequently. What have I found to fill the place of the old habit? I have begun to read much more widely, and recognise how very ill-educated I am. In my writing... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2532

The Altar Fire - Part 7 The Altar Fire - Part 7

The Altar Fire - Part 7
April 25, 1889. I found to-day on a shelf a Manual of Preparation for Holy Communion, which was given me when I was confirmed. I stood a long time reading it, and little ghosts seemed to rustle in its pages. How well I remember using it, diligently and carefully, trying to force myself into the attitude of mind that it inculcated, and humbly and sincerely believing myself wicked, reprobate, stony-hearted, because I could not do it successfully. Shall I make a curious confession? From quite early days, the time of first waking in the morning has been apt to be for... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 717

The Altar Fire - Part 6 The Altar Fire - Part 6

The Altar Fire - Part 6
March 8, 1889. I went to see Darell, my old schoolfellow, a few days ago; he wrote to say that he would much like to see me, but that he was ill and unable to leave home--could I possibly come to see him? I have never seen very much of him since I left Cambridge; but there I was a good deal in his company--and we have kept up our friendship ever since, in the quiet way in which Englishmen do keep up their friendships, meeting perhaps two or three times in the year, exchanging letters occasionally. He was not a... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1322

The Altar Fire - Part 5 The Altar Fire - Part 5

The Altar Fire - Part 5
February 3, 1889. To amuse oneself--that is the difficulty. Amusements are or ought to be the childish, irrational, savage things which a man goes on doing and practising, in virtue, I suppose, of the noble privilege of reason, far longer than any other animal--only YOUNG animals amuse themselves; a dog perhaps retains the faculty longer than most animals, but he only does it out of sympathy and companionship, to amuse his inscrutable owner, not to amuse himself. Amusements ought to be things which one wants to do, and which one is slightly ashamed of doing--enough ashamed, I mean, to give rather... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 858

The Altar Fire - Part 4 The Altar Fire - Part 4

The Altar Fire - Part 4
December 22, 1888. Perhaps my trial comes to me that it may test my faith in art; perhaps to show me that the artist's creed is a false and shallow one after all. What is it that we artists do? In a happy hour I should have said glibly that we discern and interpret beauty. But now it seems to me that no man can ever live upon beauty. I think I have gone wrong in busying myself so ardently in trying to discern the quality of beauty in all things. I seem to have submitted everything--virtue, honour, life itself--to that... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2711

The Altar Fire - Part 3 The Altar Fire - Part 3

The Altar Fire - Part 3
November 6, 1888. It is a joy to think of the way in which the best, most beautiful, most permanent things have stolen unnoticed into life. I like to think of Wordsworth, an obscure, poor, perverse, absurd man, living in the corner of the great house at Alfoxden, walking in the moonlight with Coleridge, living on milk and eggs, utterly unaccountable and puerile to the sensible man of affairs, while the two planned the Lyrical Ballads. I like to think of Keats, sitting lazily and discontentedly in the villa garden at Hampstead, with his illness growing upon him and his money... Nonfictions - Post by : rainydays - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1320

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 21. Temperament Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 21. Temperament

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 21. Temperament
CHAPTER XXI. TEMPERAMENTHugh never seemed to me to treat life in the spirit of a mystic or a dreamer, with unshared and secret experiences, withdrawing into his own ecstasy, half afraid of life, rapt away into interior visions. Though he had a deep curiosity about mystical experiences, he was never a mystic in the sense that he had, as great mystics seem to have had, one shell less, so to speak, between him and the unseen. He lived in the visible and tangible world, loving beautiful secrets; and he was a mystic only in the sense that he had an hourly... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2415

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 20. Attainment Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 20. Attainment

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 20. Attainment
CHAPTER XX. ATTAINMENTAnd then Hugh made the great change of his life, and, as a Catholic, found his dreams realized and his hopes fulfilled. He found, indeed, the life which moves and breathes inside of every faithful creed, the power which supplements weakness and represses distraction, the motive for glad sacrifice and happy obedience. I can say this thankfully enough, though in many ways I confess to being at the opposite pole of religious thought. He found relief from decision and rest from conflict. He found sympathy and confidence, a sense of corporate union, and above all a mystical and symbolical... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1681

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 19. Retrospect Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 19. Retrospect

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 19. Retrospect
CHAPTER XIX. RETROSPECTNow that I have traced the progress of Hugh's outer life from step to step, I will try to indicate what in the region of mind and soul his progress was, and I would wish to do this with particular care, even it the risk of repeating myself somewhat, because I believe that his nature was one that changed in certain ways very much; it widened and deepened greatly, and most of all in the seven last years of his life, when I believe that he found himself in the best and truest sense. As a boy, up to... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1813

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 18. Personal Characteristics Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 18. Personal Characteristics

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 18. Personal Characteristics
CHAPTER XVIII. PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICSHugh was always youthful-looking for his age, light and quick in movement, intent but never deliberate, passing very rapidly from one thing to another, impatient of boredom and dullness, always desiring to do a thing that very minute. He was fair of complexion, with grey-blue eyes and a shock head of light hair, little brushed, and uncut often too long. He was careless of appearances, and wore clothes by preference of great shabbiness. He told me in 1909 that he had only bought one suit in the last five years. I have seen him, when gardening at Hare... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 3463