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The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 7. The Delights Of Fender-Fishing The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 7. The Delights Of Fender-Fishing

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 7. The Delights Of Fender-Fishing
I should like to have met Izaak Walton. He is one of the few authors whom I know I should like to have met. For he was a wise man, and he had understanding. I should like to have gone angling with him, for I doubt not that like myself he was more of an angler theoretically than practically. My bookseller is a famous fisherman, as, indeed, booksellers generally are, since the methods employed by fishermen to deceive and to catch their finny prey are very similar to those employed by booksellers to attract and to entrap... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1561

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 6. My Romance With Fiammetta The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 6. My Romance With Fiammetta

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 6. My Romance With Fiammetta
My bookseller and I came nigh to blows some months ago over an edition of Boccaccio, which my bookseller tried to sell me. This was a copy in the original, published at Antwerp in 1603, prettily rubricated, and elaborately adorned with some forty or fifty copperplates illustrative of the text. I dare say the volume was cheap enough at thirty dollars, but I did not want it. My reason for not wanting it gave rise to that discussion between my bookseller and myself, which became very heated before it ended. I said very frankly that I did not... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1910

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 5. Baldness And Intellectuality The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 5. Baldness And Intellectuality

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 5. Baldness And Intellectuality
One of Judge Methuen's pet theories is that the soul in the human body lies near the center of gravity; this is, I believe, one of the tenets of the Buddhist faith, and for a long time I eschewed it as one might shun a vile thing, for I feared lest I should become identified even remotely with any faith or sect other than Congregationalism. Yet I noticed that in moments of fear or of joy or of the sense of any other emotion I invariably experienced a feeling of goneness in the pit of my stomach, as if, forsooth, the... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2665

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 4. The Mania Of Collecting Seizes Me The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 4. The Mania Of Collecting Seizes Me

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 4. The Mania Of Collecting Seizes Me
Captivity Waite never approved of my fondness for fairy literature. She shared the enthusiasm which I expressed whenever "Robinson Crusoe" was mentioned; there was just enough seriousness in De Foe's romance, just enough piety to appeal for sympathy to one of Captivity Waite's religious turn of mind. When it came to fiction involving witches, ogres, and flubdubs, that was too much for Captivity, and the spirit of the little Puritan revolted. Yet I have the documentary evidence to prove that Captivity's ancestors (both paternal and maternal) were, in the palmy colonial times, as abject slaves to superstition as could well be... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 612

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 3. The Luxury Of Reading In Bed The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 3. The Luxury Of Reading In Bed

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 3. The Luxury Of Reading In Bed
Last night, having written what you have just read about the benefits of fairy literature, I bethought me to renew my acquaintance with some of those tales which so often have delighted and solaced me. So I piled at least twenty chosen volumes on the table at the head of my bed, and I daresay it was nigh daylight when I fell asleep. I began my entertainment with several pages from Keightley's "Fairy Mythology," and followed it up with random bits from Crofton Croker's "Traditions of the South of Ireland," Mrs. Carey's "Legends of the French Provinces," Andrew Lang's... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1558

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 2. The Birth Of A New Passion The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 2. The Birth Of A New Passion

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 2. The Birth Of A New Passion
When I was thirteen years old I went to visit my Uncle Cephas. My grandmother would not have parted with me even for that fortnight had she not actually been compelled to. It happened that she was called to a meeting of the American Tract Society, and it was her intention to pay a visit to her cousin, Royall Eastman, after she had discharged the first and imperative duty she owed the society. Mrs. Deacon Ranney was to have taken me and provided for my temporal and spiritual wants during grandmother's absence, but at the last moment the deacon... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2956

House - Chapter 24. Driveways And Wall-Papers House - Chapter 24. Driveways And Wall-Papers

House - Chapter 24. Driveways And Wall-Papers
CHAPTER XXIV. DRIVEWAYS AND WALL-PAPERSHad we been so disposed we could have given the wretched Percival Wax a great deal of trouble. Lawyer Miles was anxious to prosecute the fellow, and I dare say he felt that he had missed the greatest opportunity of his life when Alice and I concluded to let the matter drop. We were moved to this decision by the consideration that, while we owed Percival Wax only our resentment and vengeance, a prosecution of him for his numerous misdemeanors would put us to no end of trouble. The exposure and punishment of vice would... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 822

House - Chapter 23. Alice's Night Watchman House - Chapter 23. Alice's Night Watchman

House - Chapter 23. Alice's Night Watchman
CHAPTER XXIII. ALICE'S NIGHT WATCHMANFrom what I have already told you it is likely that you have gathered that Alice and I had good reason to conclude that being a householder was by no means as cheap an enjoyment as could be conceived of. We recalled the words of the sagacious and prudent Mr. Denslow. "When you get a place of your own," said that wise man, "you will find that there will be a thousand annoying little demands for your money where now there is one." Our other friend, Mr. Black, had expressed the same idea when... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1704

House - Chapter 22. The Butler's Pantry House - Chapter 22. The Butler's Pantry

House - Chapter 22. The Butler's Pantry
CHAPTER XXII. THE BUTLER'S PANTRYIn the good old days, which were, of course, the days when you and I were boys and girls together at Biddeford, Me., our civilization knew nothing of that miserable invention which is now foisted upon the modern house under the name of butler's pantry. In those good old days we used to have pantries and china closets and butteries and all that sort of thing, and people were contented. At the present time, however, civilization is so curiously possessed of a desire to ape the customs of European society that every kind of innovation is... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2980

House - Chapter 21. With Plumbers And Painters House - Chapter 21. With Plumbers And Painters

House - Chapter 21. With Plumbers And Painters
CHAPTER XXI. WITH PLUMBERS AND PAINTERSIt did not take me long to find out that, in the treatment of the interior of the new house, Alice had fallen a victim to the influence of the Denslow-Baylor-Maria schools. I was not much surprised by this discovery, for I had known for some time that Alice regarded the Denslows and the Baylors as people of rare taste, and it was quite natural (as every unprejudiced person will allow) that, associating with Adah continually and being bound to her by ties of consanguinity, Alice should be susceptible to Adah's hortations, incitements, impulsations, and... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 3073

House - Chapter 20. I Acquire Poison And Experience House - Chapter 20. I Acquire Poison And Experience

House - Chapter 20. I Acquire Poison And Experience
CHAPTER XX. I ACQUIRE POISON AND EXPERIENCEThere is no telling to what unparalleled extent I should have carried my agricultural work but for a happening which interrupted my career in that direction and temporarily invalidated me for the performance of all manual labor. To make short of a long and painful story, I will tell you at once that in the very midst of my agricultural triumphs I was rudely awakened to a realization of the fact that I had been badly poisoned by ivy. The luxuriant growth in one part of our lawn which in my innocence I... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1565

House - Chapter 19. Other People's Dogs House - Chapter 19. Other People's Dogs

House - Chapter 19. Other People's Dogs
CHAPTER XIX. OTHER PEOPLE'S DOGSWhen I discovered one morning that my young sunflowers and my tomato vines had been cut down during the night by some lawless depredator I was mightily incensed. I had not supposed that there was anybody so mean as to commit such a wanton destruction. The value of the property destroyed was not large; I had paid but five cents apiece for the twenty tomato vines, and the young sunflowers were a present from Fadda Pierce. The intrinsic value of these things was so small as to cut no figure in my mind, but... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2258

House - Chapter 18. I State My Views On Taxation House - Chapter 18. I State My Views On Taxation

House - Chapter 18. I State My Views On Taxation
CHAPTER XVIII. I STATE MY VIEWS ON TAXATIONOf the many friends who hastened to congratulate us when they heard that we had acquired a home, none was more delighted than Gamlin Harland. I take it for granted that you have read Mr. Harland's numerous books, and that you know all about Mr. Harland himself. Not to know of him is to argue one's self unknown. My first meeting with Mr. Harland was at a single-tax convention six years ago; he was a delegate to that convention from Wisconsin, and I was a delegate from Illinois. I was a... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2905

House - Chapter 14. The Victim Of An Ordinance House - Chapter 14. The Victim Of An Ordinance

House - Chapter 14. The Victim Of An Ordinance
CHAPTER XIV. THE VICTIM OF AN ORDINANCEAnd now that a plentiful supply of water was provided, it seemed proper to celebrate by giving the lawn (poor abused thing!) a deluge of the refreshing element. The exceeding ardor of the sun and the absence of rain had wrought havoc with the grass and shrubbery. The drought seemed determined to finish the work of destruction which the workmen, with their picks and spades, had begun. With a joyous heart, therefore, I applied myself to the task of rescuing the fainting vegetation. I borrowed Mr. Tiltman's hose because it was... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2167

House - Chapter 13. Editor Woodsit A True Friend House - Chapter 13. Editor Woodsit A True Friend

House - Chapter 13. Editor Woodsit A True Friend
CHAPTER XIII. EDITOR WOODSIT A TRUE FRIENDOne morning--it was a Thursday morning, as I distinctly recall--I was much surprised to find that work upon the house had practically been suspended. I was sure there could not have been a strike, for I told the workmen at the beginning that whenever they felt as if they were not getting enough pay they must come to me about it and I would raise their wages. They had already been to me three times and received an increase of pay each time. So I felt moderately secure against a strike.... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 3224

House - Chapter 12. I Am Deceived In Mr. Wax House - Chapter 12. I Am Deceived In Mr. Wax

House - Chapter 12. I Am Deceived In Mr. Wax
CHAPTER XII. I AM DECEIVED IN MR. WAXI went on to say that it seemed to me to be unwise to invest too much power in Alice's hands; that _I had certain rights which should be protected, and that if I was not to be assured a life estate in Alice's property I ought to have at least thirty-three feet to which I could, in an emergency, retire to spend the evening of my existence in peace and security. "Possessed of that thirty-three feet," said I, "I make no question that I shall soon be able to bring Alice to terms.... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1152

House - Chapter 11. I Make A Stand For My Rights House - Chapter 11. I Make A Stand For My Rights

House - Chapter 11. I Make A Stand For My Rights
CHAPTER XI. I MAKE A STAND FOR MY RIGHTSShortly after Mr. Black's arrival that worthy gentleman was escorted with all due formality to the old Schmittheimer place in Clarendon Avenue. Recognizing the fact that first impressions are lasting, we determined that Mr. Black's first impressions of our purchase should be favorable. So we conducted him to our property by a rather circuitous route. The approach to the old Schmittheimer place from the north is by all means the most agreeable; it leads by Mr. Rink's fine colonial house and Martin Howard's new place and through an embowered avenue... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 3234

House - Chapter 10. Colonel Doller's Great Idea House - Chapter 10. Colonel Doller's Great Idea

House - Chapter 10. Colonel Doller's Great Idea
CHAPTER X. COLONEL DOLLER'S GREAT IDEAColonel Bobbett Doller and I sat down, side by side, on the pile of bricks, and the colonel proceeded straightway to disclose pleasing visions to my mind's eye. "You are doubtless aware," said the colonel, "that you are not, in the severest acceptation of the term, a business man?" "Alas," said I, "I am compelled in all candor to admit that lamentable fact." "Then," continued the colonel, "you probably do not know that this noble expanse of high ground upon which your stately residence is reared is the exact centre of a radius of eighty miles.... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2968

House - Chapter 9. Neighbor Macleod's Thistle House - Chapter 9. Neighbor Macleod's Thistle

House - Chapter 9. Neighbor Macleod's Thistle
CHAPTER IX. NEIGHBOR MACLEOD'S THISTLEThe incident of the tabby cat's appearance with six kittens may have been a portent either of good or of evil. As you know, I am not a superstitious person. I smile at those whimsical fancies which figure so conspicuously in many people's lives, such as the howling of dogs, the flickering of a candle, the arrangement of the grounds in a cup, the cracking of a mirror, the sudden stopping of the clock, the crowing of hens, the chirping of crickets, the hooting of an owl, the fall of a family portrait, the spilling... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2668

House - Chapter 8. The Vandals Begin Their Work House - Chapter 8. The Vandals Begin Their Work

House - Chapter 8. The Vandals Begin Their Work
CHAPTER VIII. THE VANDALS BEGIN THEIR WORKAt the regular April meeting of the Lake Shore Society of Antiquarians I met my old and valued friend, Belville Rock, and told him of the important venture which Alice had made. He seemed greatly pleased at the prospect of our having a home of our own, and after making careful inquiries into the extent and character of the improvements we contemplated he bade me tell Alice that he wanted to pay the bill for the painting of the exterior of the house. "I desire to do somewhat toward beautifying your premises," said... Nonfictions - Post by : caller - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 956