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Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 17. Burial Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 17. Burial

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 17. Burial
CHAPTER XVII. BURIALWe had thought that he should be buried at Manchester; but a paper of directions was found saying that he wished to be buried at Hare Street, in his own orchard, at the foot of his Calvary. My mother arrived on the Monday evening, and in the course of Tuesday we saw his body for the last time, in biretta and cassock, with a rosary in his hands. He looked strangely young, like a statue carved in alabaster, with no trace of pain or weariness about him, simply asleep. His coffin was taken to the midnight train by the... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2522

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 16. The End Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 16. The End

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 16. The End
CHAPTER XVI. THE ENDI had spent a long day in London at a business meeting we discussed a complicated educational problem. I came away alone; I was anxious to have news of my sister, who had that morning undergone a slight operation; but I was not gravely disquieted, because no serious complications were expected. When I reached my house there were two telegrams awaiting me, one to say that the operation had gone well, the other from Canon Sharrock, of Salford, to say that my brother was dangerously ill of pneumonia. I wired at once for a further report, and... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2332

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 12. Cambridge Again Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 12. Cambridge Again

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 12. Cambridge Again
CHAPTER XII. CAMBRIDGE AGAINHugh went to the College of San Silvestro in Rome, and there he found many friends. He said that on first joining the Catholic Church, he felt like a lost dog; he wrote to me: Rome, _Nov. 26_, '03. * * * * * My own news is almost impossible to tell, as everything is simply bewildering: in about five years from now I shall know how I felt; but at present I feel... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 3091

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 11. The Decision Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 11. The Decision

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 11. The Decision
CHAPTER XI. THE DECISIONBy this time we all knew what was about to happen. "When a man's mind is made up," says the old Irish proverb, "his feet must set out on the way." Just before my brother made his profession as a Brother of the Mirfield Community, he was asked by Bishop Gore whether he was in any danger of becoming a Roman Catholic. My brother said honestly, "Not so far as I can see." This was in July 1901. In September 1903 he was received into the Church of Rome. What was it which had caused the change? It... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2095

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 10. The Change Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 10. The Change

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 10. The Change
CHAPTER X. THE CHANGEHugh has himself traced in full detail, in his book _The Confessions of a Convert_, how he gradually became convinced that it was his duty to make his submission to the Church of Rome; and I will not repeat the story here. But I can recall very distinctly the period during which he was making up his mind. He left Mirfield in the early summer of 1903, so that when I came home for the summer holidays, he was living there. I had myself just accepted from King Edward the task of editing Queen Victoria's letters, and had... Nonfictions - Post by : 67834 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1908

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 9. Kemsing And Mirfield Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 9. Kemsing And Mirfield

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 9. Kemsing And Mirfield
CHAPTER IX. KEMSING AND MIRFIELDThe change proved very beneficial to Hugh; but it was then, with returning health and leisure for reflection, that he began to consider the whole question of Anglicanism and Catholicism. He describes some of the little experiences which turned his mind in this direction. He became aware of the isolation and what he calls the "provincialism" of the Anglican Church. He saw many kinds of churches and varieties of worship. He went on through the Holy Land, and at Jerusalem celebrated the Communion in the Chapel of Abraham; at Damascus he heard with a sort of horror... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2331

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 8. The Eton Mission Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 8. The Eton Mission

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 8. The Eton Mission
CHAPTER VIII. THE ETON MISSIONThere were many reasons why Hugh should begin his clerical work at Hackney Wick, though I suspect it was mainly my father's choice. It was a large, uniformly poor district, which had been adopted by Eton in about 1880 as the scene of its Mission. There were certain disadvantages attending the choice of that particular district. The real _raison d'etre of a School Mission is educative rather than philanthropic, in order to bring boys into touch with social problems, and to give them some idea that the way of the world is not the way of a... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1192

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 7. Llandaff Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 7. Llandaff

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 7. Llandaff
CHAPTER VII. LLANDAFFIn 1892 Hugh went to read for Orders, with Dean Vaughan, who held the Deanery of Llandaff together with the Mastership of the Temple. The Dean had been a successful Headmaster of Harrow, and for a time Vicar of Doncaster. He was an Evangelical by training and temperament. My father had a high admiration for him as a great headmaster, a profound and accomplished scholar, and most of all as a man of deep and fervent piety. I remember Vaughan's visits to Lambeth. He had the air, I used to think, rather of an old-fashioned and highly-bred country clergyman... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 3400

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 6. Cambridge Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 6. Cambridge

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 6. Cambridge
CHAPTER VI. CAMBRIDGEHugh went then to Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1890. He often talked to me in later days about his time there as an undergraduate. He found a number of his Eton contemporaries up there, and he had a very sociable time. A friend and contemporary of his at Trinity describes him as small, light, and boyish-looking. "He walked fast, and always appeared to be busy." He never cared much about athletics, but he was an excellent steerer. He steered the third Trinity boat all the time he was at Cambridge, and was a member of the Leander club. He... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2541

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 2. Childhood Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 2. Childhood

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 2. Childhood
CHAPTER II. CHILDHOODI very well remember the sudden appearance of Hugh in the nursery world, and being conducted into a secluded dressing-room, adjacent to the nursery the tiny creature lay, lost in contented dreams, in a big, white-draped, white-hooded cradle. It was just a rather pleasing and exciting event to us children, not particularly wonderful or remarkable. It was at Wellington College that he was born, in the Master's Lodge, in a sunny bedroom, in the south-east corner of the house; one of its windows looking to the south front of the college and the chapel with its slender spire;... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 564

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 1. Hare Street Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 1. Hare Street

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Chapter 1. Hare Street
CHAPTER I. HARE STREETHow loudly and boisterously the wind roared to-day across the low-hung, cloud-smeared sky, driving the broken rack before it, warm and wet out of the south! What a wintry landscape! leafless trees bending beneath the onset of the wind, bare and streaming hedges, pale close-reaped wheat-fields, brown ploughland, spare pastures stretching away to left and right, softly rising and falling to the horizon; nothing visible but distant belts of trees and coverts, with here and there the tower of a hidden church overtopping them, and a windmill or two; on the left, long lines of willows marking the... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1169

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Preface Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Preface

Hugh: Memoirs Of A Brother - Preface
This book was begun with no hope or intention of making a formal and finished biography, but only to place on record some of my brother's sayings and doings, to fix scenes and memories before they suffered from any dim obliteration of time, to catch, if I could, for my own comfort and delight, the tone and sense of that vivid and animated atmosphere which Hugh always created about him. His arrival upon any scene was never in the smallest degree uproarious, and still less was it in the least mild or serene; yet he came into a settled circle like... Nonfictions - Post by : dan7530 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1585

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 18. My Workshop And Others The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 18. My Workshop And Others

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 18. My Workshop And Others
The women-folk are few up there, For 't were not fair, you know, That they our heavenly bliss should share Who vex us here below! The few are those who have been kind To husbands such as we: They knew our fads and didn't mind-- Says Dibdin's ghost to me.It has never been explained to my satisfaction why women, as a class, are the enemies of books, and are particularly hostile to bibliomania. The exceptions met with now... Nonfictions - Post by : Deneen_Thomas - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1021

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 17. The Napoleonic Renaissance The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 17. The Napoleonic Renaissance

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 17. The Napoleonic Renaissance
If I had begun collecting Napoleonana in my youth I should now have on hand a priceless collection. This reminds me that when I first came to Chicago suburban property along the North Shore could be bought for five hundred dollars an acre which now sells for two hundred dollars a front foot; if I had purchased real estate in that locality when I had the opportunity forty years ago I should be a millionnaire at the present time. I think I am more regretful of having neglected the Napoleonana than of having missed the real-estate chances, for since my... Nonfictions - Post by : Marc_Meole - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2506

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 16. The Malady Called Catalogitis The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 16. The Malady Called Catalogitis

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 16. The Malady Called Catalogitis
Judge Methuen tells me that one of the most pleasing delusions he has experienced in his long and active career as a bibliomaniac is that which is born of the catalogue habit. Presuming that there are among my readers many laymen,--for I preach salvation to the heathen,--I will explain for their information that the catalogue habit, so called, is a practice to which the confirmed lover of books is likely to become addicted. It is a custom of many publishers and dealers to publish and to disseminate at certain periods lists of their wares, in the hope of thereby... Nonfictions - Post by : Marc_Meole - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1687

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 15. A Book That Brings Solace And Cheer The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 15. A Book That Brings Solace And Cheer

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 15. A Book That Brings Solace And Cheer
One of my friends had a mania for Bunyan once upon a time, and, although he has now abandoned that fad for the more fashionable passion of Napoleonana, he still exhibits with evident pride the many editions of the "Pilgrim's Progress" he gathered together years ago. I have frequently besought him to give me one of his copies, which has a curious frontispiece illustrating the dangers besetting the traveller from the City of Destruction to the Celestial City. This frontispiece, which is prettily illuminated, occurs in Virtue's edition of the "Pilgrim's Progress"; the book itself is not rare, but... Nonfictions - Post by : Marc_Meole - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1327

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 14. Elzevirs And Divers Other Matters The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 14. Elzevirs And Divers Other Matters

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 14. Elzevirs And Divers Other Matters
Boswell's "Life of Johnson" and Lockhart's "Life of Scott" are accepted as the models of biography. The third remarkable performance in this line is Mrs. Gordon's memoir of her father, John Wilson, a volume so charmingly and tenderly written as to be of interest to those even who know and care little about that era in the history of English literature in which "crusty Christopher" and his associates in the making of "Blackwood's" figured. It is a significant fact, I think, that the three greatest biographers the world has known should have been Scotch; it has long been the fashion... Nonfictions - Post by : Marc_Meole - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2477

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 13. On The Odors Which My Books Exhale The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 13. On The Odors Which My Books Exhale

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 13. On The Odors Which My Books Exhale
Have you ever come out of the thick, smoky atmosphere of the town into the fragrant, gracious atmosphere of a library? If you have, you know how grateful the change is, and you will agree with me when I say that nothing else is so quieting to the nerves, so conducive to physical health, and so quick to restore a lively flow of the spirits. Lafcadio Hearn once wrote a treatise upon perfumes, an ingenious and scholarly performance; he limited the edition to fifty copies and published it privately--so the book is rarely met with. Curiously enough, however, this author... Nonfictions - Post by : Marc_Meole - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2821

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 12. The Pleasures Of Extra-Illustration The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 12. The Pleasures Of Extra-Illustration

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 12. The Pleasures Of Extra-Illustration
Very many years ago we became convinced--Judge Methuen and I did--that there was nothing new in the world. I think it was while we were in London and while we were deep in the many fads of bibliomania that we arrived at this important conclusion. We had been pursuing with enthusiasm the exciting delights of extra-illustration, a practice sometimes known as Grangerism; the friends of the practice call it by the former name, the enemies by the latter. We were engaged at extra-illustrating Boswell's life of Johnson, and had already got together somewhat more than eleven thousand prints when... Nonfictions - Post by : Marc_Meole - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 2247

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 8. Ballads And Their Makers The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 8. Ballads And Their Makers

The Love Affairs Of A Bibliomaniac - Chapter 8. Ballads And Their Makers
One of the most interesting spots in all London to me is Bunhill Fields cemetery, for herein are the graves of many whose memory I revere. I had heard that Joseph Ritson was buried here, and while my sister, Miss Susan, lingered at the grave of her favorite poet, I took occasion to spy around among the tombstones in the hope of discovering the last resting-place of the curious old antiquary whose labors in the field of balladry have placed me under so great a debt of gratitude to him. But after I had searched in vain for somewhat more... Nonfictions - Post by : stevekiene - Date : May 2012 - Author : Eugene Field - Read : 1522