Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeNonfictionsPage 1
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 101 To Letter 107 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 101 To Letter 107

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 101 To Letter 107
LETTER CI TO LETTER CVIILETTER CI. TO MR. GILLMAN. _November 30, 1829. Dear G.,--The excursionists reached home and the good town of Enfield a little after four, without slip or dislocation. Little has transpired concerning the events of the back-journey, save that on passing the house of 'Squire Mellish, situate a stone bow's cast from the hamlet, Father Westwood (1), with a good-natured wonderment, exclaimed, "I cannot think what is gone of Mr. Mellish's rooks. I fancy they have taken flight somewhere; but I have missed them two or three years past." All this while, according to his fellow-traveller's report, the... Nonfictions - Post by : Priscilla - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1344

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 71 To Letter 80 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 71 To Letter 80

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 71 To Letter 80
LETTER LXXI TO LETTER LXXXLETTER LXXI. TO WALTER WILSON. _December 16, 1822. Dear Wilson,--_Lightning I was going to call you. You must have thought me negligent in not answering your letter sooner. But I have a habit of never writing letters but at the office; 'tis so much time cribbed out of the Company; and I am but just got out of the thick of a tea-sale, in which most of the entry of notes, deposits, etc., usually falls to my share. I have nothing of De Foe's but two or three novels and the "Plague History." (1) I can... Nonfictions - Post by : Priscilla - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1450

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 61 To Letter 70 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 61 To Letter 70

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 61 To Letter 70
LETTER LXI TO LETTER LXXLETTER LXI. TO WORDSWORTH. _April 26, 1816. Dear W.,--I have just finished the pleasing task of correcting the revise of the poems and letter. (1) I hope they will come out faultless. One blunder I saw and shuddered at. The hallucinating rascal had printed _battered for _battened_, this last not conveying any distinct sense to his gaping soul. The Reader (as they call 'em) had discovered it, and given it the marginal brand; but the substitutory _n had not yet appeared. I accompanied his notice with a most pathetic address to the printer not to neglect the... Nonfictions - Post by : Priscilla - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2842

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 51 To Letter 60 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 51 To Letter 60

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 51 To Letter 60
LETTER LI TO LETTER LXLETTER LI. TO MISS WORDSWORTH. _August_, 1810. Mary has left a little space for me to fill up with nonsense, as the geographers used to cram monsters in the voids of the maps, and call it _Terra Incognita_. She has told you how she has taken to water like a hungry otter. I too limp after her in lame imitation, (1) but it goes against me a little at first. I have been acquaintance with it now for full four days, and it seems a moon. I am full of cramps and rheumatisms, and cold internally, so... Nonfictions - Post by : rayling - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3356

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 41 To Letter 50 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 41 To Letter 50

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 41 To Letter 50
LETTER XLI TO LETTER LLETTER XLI. TO MANNING. _February 19, 1803. My Dear Manning,--The general scope of your letter afforded no indications of insanity, but some particular points raised a scruple. For God's sake, don't think any more of "Independent Tartary." (1) What are you to do among such Ethiopians? Is there no _lineal descendant of Prester John? Is the chair empty? Is the sword unswayed? Depend upon it, they'll never make you their king as long as any branch of that great stock is remaining. I tremble for your Christianity. They will certainly circumcise you. Read Sir John Mandeville's travels... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2576

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 31 To Letter 40 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 31 To Letter 40

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 31 To Letter 40
LETTER XXXI TO LETTER XLLETTER XXXI. TO MANNING. _November 28, 1800 Dear Manning,--I have received a very kind invitation from Lloyd and Sophia to go and spend a month with them at the Lakes. Now, it fortunately happens (which is so seldom the case) that I have spare cash by me enough to answer the expenses of so long a journey; and I am determined to get away from the office by some means. The purpose of this letter is to request of you (my dear friend) that you will not take it unkind if I decline my proposed visit to... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 2219

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 21 To Letter 30 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 21 To Letter 30

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 21 To Letter 30
LETTER XXI TO LETTER XXXLETTER XXI. TO MANNING. Before _June_, 1800. Dear Manning,--I feel myself unable to thank you sufficiently for your kind letter. It was doubly acceptable to me, both for the choice poetry and the kind, honest prose which it contained. It was just such a letter as I should have expected from Manning. I am in much better spirits than when I wrote last. I have had a very eligible offer to lodge with a friend in town. He will have rooms to let at midsummer, by which time I hope my sister will be well enough to... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1040

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 11 To Letter 20 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 11 To Letter 20

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 11 To Letter 20
LETTER XI TO LETTER XXLETTER XI. TO COLERIDGE. _January 5, 1797. _Sunday Morning_.--You cannot surely mean to degrade the Joan of Arc into a pot-girl. (1) You are not going, I hope, to annex to that most splendid ornament of Southey's poem all this cock-and-a-bull story of Joan, the publican's daughter of Neufchatel, with the lamentable episode of a wagoner, his wife, and six children. The texture will be most lamentably disproportionate. The first forty or fifty lines of these addenda are no doubt in their way admirable too; but many would prefer the Joan of Southey. (1) Coleridge, in later... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 1892

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 1 To Letter 10 The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 1 To Letter 10

The Best Letters Of Charles Lamb - Letter 1 To Letter 10
LETTER I TO LETTER XTO SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE _May 27, 1796. Dear Coleridge,--Make yourself perfectly easy about May. I paid his bill when I sent your clothes. I was flush of money, and am so still to all the purposes of a single life; so give yourself no further concern about it. The money would be superfluous to me if I had it. When Southey becomes as modest as his predecessor, Milton, and publishes his Epics in duodecimo, I will read 'em; a guinea a book is somewhat exorbitant, nor have I the opportunity of borrowing the work. The extracts from... Nonfictions - Post by : ID3000 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Lamb - Read : 3101

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Lyttelton Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Lyttelton

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Lyttelton
George Lyttelton, the son of Sir Thomas Lyttelton, of Hagley, in Worcestershire, was born in 1709. He was educated at Eton he was so much distinguished that his exercises were recommended as models to his schoolfellows. From Eton he went to Christchurch he retained the same reputation of superiority, and displayed his abilities to the public in a poem on "Blenheim." He was a very early writer both in verse and prose. His "Progress of Love" and his "Persian Letters" were both written when he was very young, and, indeed, the character of a young... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 2343

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Gray Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Gray

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Gray
Thomas Gray, the son of Mr. Philip Gray, a scrivener of London, was born in Cornhill, November 26, 1716. His grammatical education he received at Eton, under the care of Mr. Antrobus, his mother's brother, then assistant to Dr. George, and when he left school, in 1734, entered a pensioner at Peterhouse, in Cambridge. The transition from the school to the college is, to most young scholars, the time from which they date their years of manhood, liberty, and happiness; but Gray seems to have been very little delighted with academical gratifications; he liked at Cambridge neither the mode... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 2757

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Akenside Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Akenside

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Akenside
Mark Akenside was born on the 9th of November, 1721, at Newcastle- upon-Tyne. His father Mark was a butcher, of the Presbyterian sect; his mother's name was Mary Lumsden. He received the first part of his education at the grammar-school of Newcastle; and was afterwards instructed by Mr. Wilson, who kept a private academy. At the age of eighteen he was sent to Edinburgh that he might qualify himself for the office of a dissenting minister, and received some assistance from the fund which the dissenters employ in educating young men of scanty fortune. But a wider... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 1195

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Mallet Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Mallet

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Mallet
Of David Mallet, having no written memorial, I am able to give no other account than such as is supplied by the unauthorised loquacity of common fame, and a very slight personal knowledge. He was by his original one of the Macgregors, a clan that became, about sixty years ago, under the conduct of Robin Roy, so formidable and so infamous for violence and robbery, that the name was annulled by a legal abolition; and when they were all to denominate themselves anew, the father, I suppose, of this author, called himself Malloch. David Malloch was, by the penury of... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 3538

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Young Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Young

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Young
The following life was written, at my request, by a gentleman (Mr. Herbert Croft) who had better information than I could easily have obtained; and the public will perhaps wish that I had solicited and obtained more such favours from him:-- "Dear Sir,--In consequence of our different conversations about authentic materials for the Life of Young, I send you the following details:"-- Of great men something must always be said to gratify curiosity. Of the illustrious author of the "Night Thoughts" much has been told of which there never could have been proofs, and little care appears to have been... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 2569

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Shenstone Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Shenstone

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Shenstone
William Shenstone, the son of Thomas Shenstone and Anne Pen, was born in November, 1714, at the Leasowes in Hales-Owen, one of those insulated districts which, in the division of the kingdom, was appended, for some reason not now discoverable, to a distant county; and which, though surrounded by Warwickshire and Worcestershire, belongs to Shropshire, though perhaps thirty miles distant from any other part of it. He learned to read of an old dame, whom his poem of the "Schoolmistress" has delivered to posterity; and soon received such delight from books, that he was always calling for fresh entertainment, and... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 3075

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Dyer Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Dyer

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Dyer
John Dyer, of whom I have no other account to give than his own letters, published with Hughes's correspondence, and the notes added by the editor, have afforded me, was born in 1700, the second son of Robert Dyer of Aberglasney, in Caermarthenshire, a solicitor of great capacity and note. He passed through Westminster school under the care of Dr. Freind, and was then called home to be instructed in his father's profession. But his father died soon, and he took no delight in the study of the law; but, having always amused himself with drawing, resolved to turn... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 3522

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - A. Philips Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - A. Philips

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - A. Philips
Of the birth or early part of the life of Ambrose Philips I have not been able to find any account. His academical education he received at St. John's College in Cambridge he first solicited the notice of the world by some English verses, in the collection published by the University on the death of Queen Mary. From this time how he was employed, or in what station he passed his life, is not yet discovered. He must have published his "Pastorals" before the year 1708, because they are evidently prior to those of Pope. He afterwards... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 1783

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Watts Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Watts

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Watts
The poems of Dr. Watts were, by my recommendation, inserted in the late Collection, the readers of which are to impute to me whatever pleasure or weariness they may find in the perusal of Blackmore, Watts, Pomfret, and Yalden. Isaac Watts was born July 17, 1674, at Southampton his father, of the same name, kept a boarding-school for young gentlemen, though common report makes him a shoemaker. He appears, from the narrative of Dr. Gibbons, to have been neither indigent nor illiterate. Isaac, the eldest of nine children, was given to books from his infancy, and began, we are... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 2112

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Thomson Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Thomson

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Thomson
James Thomson, the son of a minister well esteemed for his piety and diligence, was born September 7, 1700, at Ednam, in the shire of Roxburgh, of which his father was pastor. His mother, whose name was Hume, inherited as co-heiress a portion of a small estate. The revenue of a parish in Scotland is seldom large; and it was probably in commiseration of the difficulty with which Mr. Thomson supported his family, having nine children, that Mr. Riccarton, a neighbouring minister, discovering in James uncommon promises of future excellence, undertook to superintend his education, and provide him books.... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 990

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Somervile Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Somervile

Johnson's Lives Of Poets: Gay, Thomson, Young, Mallet, Gray, Lyttelton,... - Somervile
Of Mr. Somervile's life I am not able to say anything that can satisfy curiosity. He was a gentleman whose estate lay in Warwickshire; his house he was born in 1693, is called Edston, a seat inherited from a long line of ancestors; for he was said to be of the first family in his county. He tells of himself that he was born near the Avon's banks. He was bred at Winchester school, and was elected fellow of New College. It does not appear that in the places of his education he exhibited any uncommon... Nonfictions - Post by : gfranklin - Date : May 2012 - Author : Samuel Johnson - Read : 930