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Poor Miss Finch - Preface Poor Miss Finch - Preface

Poor Miss Finch - Preface
TO MRS. ELLIOT, (OF THE DEANERY, BRISTOL). WILL YOU honor me by accepting the Dedication of this book, in remembrance of an uninterrupted friendship of many years? More than one charming blind girl, in fiction and in the drama, has preceded "Poor Miss Finch." But, so far as I know, blindness in these cases has been always exhibited, more or less exclusively, from the ideal and the sentimental point of view. The attempt here made is to appeal to an interest of another kind, by exhibiting blindness as it really is. I have carefully gathered the information necessary to the execution... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1066

The Two Destinies - Chapter 37. The Two Destinies The Two Destinies - Chapter 37. The Two Destinies

The Two Destinies - Chapter 37. The Two Destinies
CHAPTER XXXVII. THE TWO DESTINIESI MADE no movement to leave the room; I let no sign of sorrow escape me. At last, my heart was hardened against the woman who had so obstinately rejected me. I stood looking down at her with a merciless anger, the bare remembrance of which fills me at this day with a horror of myself. There is but one excuse for me. The shock of that last overthrow of the one hope that held me to life was more than my reason could endure. On that dreadful night (whatever I may have been at other times),... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1186

The Two Destinies - Chapter 36. Love And Pride The Two Destinies - Chapter 36. Love And Pride

The Two Destinies - Chapter 36. Love And Pride
CHAPTER XXXVI. LOVE AND PRIDEA CRY of terror from the room told me that I had been heard. For a moment more nothing happened. Then the child's voice reached me, wild and shrill: "Open the shutters, mamma! I said he was coming--I want to see him!" There was still an interval of hesitation before the mother opened the shutters. She did it at last. I saw her darkly at the window, with the light behind her, and the child's head just visible above the lower part of the window-frame. The quaint little face moved rapidly up and down, as if my... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 3154

The Two Destinies - Chapter 35. Under The Window The Two Destinies - Chapter 35. Under The Window

The Two Destinies - Chapter 35. Under The Window
CHAPTER XXXV. UNDER THE WINDOWI SET the position of the harbor by my pocket-compass, and then followed the course of the first street that lay before me. On either side, as I advanced, the desolate old houses frowned on me. There were no lights in the windows, no lamps in the streets. For a quarter of an hour at least I penetrated deeper and deeper into the city, without encountering a living creature on my way--with only the starlight to guide me. Turning by chance into a street broader than the rest, I at last saw a moving figure, just visible... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1166

The Two Destinies - Chapter 34. By Land And Sea The Two Destinies - Chapter 34. By Land And Sea

The Two Destinies - Chapter 34. By Land And Sea
CHAPTER XXXIV. BY LAND AND SEAIT mattered little to me to what port the vessel was bound. Go where I might, I knew that I was on my way to Mrs. Van Brandt. She had need of me again; she had claimed me again. Where the visionary hand of the child had pointed, thither I was destined to go. Abroad or at home, it mattered nothing: when I next set my foot on the land, I should be further directed on the journey which lay before me. I believed this as firmly as I believed that I had been guided, thus... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1655

The Two Destinies - Chapter 33. A Vision Of The Night The Two Destinies - Chapter 33. A Vision Of The Night

The Two Destinies - Chapter 33. A Vision Of The Night
CHAPTER XXXIII. A VISION OF THE NIGHTRETURNING to the cottage parlor, I took a chair by the window and opened my pocket-book at a blank page. I had certain directions to give to my representatives, which might spare them some trouble and uncertainty in the event of my death. Disguising my last instructions under the commonplace heading of "Memoranda on my return to London," I began to write. I had filled one page of the pocket-book, and had just turned to the next, when I became conscious of a difficulty in fixing my attention on the subject that was before it.... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1457

The Two Destinies - Chapter 32. A Last Look At Greenwater Broad The Two Destinies - Chapter 32. A Last Look At Greenwater Broad

The Two Destinies - Chapter 32. A Last Look At Greenwater Broad
CHAPTER XXXII. A LAST LOOK AT GREENWATER BROADMY spirits rose as I walked through the bright empty streets, and breathed the fresh morning air. Taking my way eastward through the great city, I stopped at the first office that I passed, and secured my place by the early coach to Ipswich. Thence I traveled with post-horses to the market-town which was nearest to Greenwater Broad. A walk of a few miles in the cool evening brought me, through well-remembered by-roads, to our old house. By the last rays of the setting sun I looked at the familiar row of windows in... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 952

The Two Destinies - Chapter 31. The Physician's Opinion The Two Destinies - Chapter 31. The Physician's Opinion

The Two Destinies - Chapter 31. The Physician's Opinion
CHAPTER XXXI. THE PHYSICIAN'S OPINIONSIX months have elapsed. Summer-time has come again. The last parting is over. Prolonged by my care, the days of my mother's life have come to their end. She has died in my arms: her last words have been spoken to me, her last look on earth has been mine. I am now, in the saddest and plainest meaning of the words, alone in the world. The affliction which has befallen me has left certain duties to be performed that require my presence in London. My house is let; I am staying at a hotel. My friend,... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1050

The Two Destinies - Chapter 28. Love And Money The Two Destinies - Chapter 28. Love And Money

The Two Destinies - Chapter 28. Love And Money
CHAPTER XXVIII. LOVE AND MONEY FEELING the embarrassment of the moment most painfully on her side, Mrs. Van Brandt spoke first. "You have said nothing to me about yourself," she began. "Is your life a happier one than it was when we last met?" "I cannot honestly say that it is," I answered. "Is there any prospect of your being married?" "My prospect of being married still rests with you." "Don't say that!" she exclaimed, with an entreating look at me. "Don't spoil my pleasure in seeing you again by speaking of what can never be! Have you still to be... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 2986

The Two Destinies - Chapter 27. Conversation With Mrs. Van Brandt The Two Destinies - Chapter 27. Conversation With Mrs. Van Brandt

The Two Destinies - Chapter 27. Conversation With Mrs. Van Brandt
CHAPTER XXVII. CONVERSATION WITH MRS. VAN BRANDTTHE landlady was taking the air at her own door when I reached the house. Her reply to my inquiries justified my most hopeful anticipations. The poor lodger looked already "like another woman"; and the child was at that moment posted on the stairs, watching for the return of her "new papa." "There's one thing I should wish to say to you, sir, before you go upstairs," the woman went on. "Don't trust the lady with more money at a time than the money that is wanted for the day's housekeeping. If she has any... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 3121

The Two Destinies - Chapter 26. Conversation With My Mother The Two Destinies - Chapter 26. Conversation With My Mother

The Two Destinies - Chapter 26. Conversation With My Mother
CHAPTER XXVI. CONVERSATION WITH MY MOTHERI REACHED my own house in time to snatch two or three hours of repose, before I paid my customary morning visit to my mother in her own room. I observed, in her reception of me on this occasion, certain peculiarities of look and manner which were far from being familiar in my experience of her. When our eyes first met, she regarded me with a wistful, questioning look, as if she were troubled by some doubt which she shrunk from expressing in words. And when I inquired after her health, as usual, she surprised me... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 2892

The Two Destinies - Chapter 25. I Keep My Appointment The Two Destinies - Chapter 25. I Keep My Appointment

The Two Destinies - Chapter 25. I Keep My Appointment
CHAPTER XXV. I KEEP MY APPOINTMENTTHE poverty-stricken aspect of the street when we entered it, the dirty and dilapidated condition of the house when we drew up at the door, would have warned most men, in my position, to prepare themselves for a distressing discovery when they were admitted to the interior of the dwelling. The first impression which the place produced on _my mind suggested, on the contrary, that the boy's answers to my questions had led me astray. It was simply impossible to associate Mrs. Van Brandt (as _I remembered her) with the spectacle of such squalid poverty as... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1046

The Two Destinies - Chapter 24. In The Shadow Of St. Paul's The Two Destinies - Chapter 24. In The Shadow Of St. Paul's

The Two Destinies - Chapter 24. In The Shadow Of St. Paul's
CHAPTER XXIV. IN THE SHADOW OF ST. PAUL'S  In ten days I was at home again--and my mother's arms were round me. I had left her for my sea-voyage very unwillingly--seeing that she was in delicate health. On my return, I was grieved to observe a change for the worse, for which her letters had not prepared me. Consulting our medical friend, Mr. MacGlue, I found that he, too, had noticed my mother's failing health, but that he attributed it to an easily removable cause--to the climate of Scotland. My mother's childhood and early life had been passed on the southern... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 777

The Two Destinies - Chapter 23. The Kiss The Two Destinies - Chapter 23. The Kiss

The Two Destinies - Chapter 23. The Kiss
CHAPTER XXIII. THE KISSSHE had need of me again. She had claimed me again. I felt all the old love, all the old devotion owning her power once more. Whatever had mortified or angered me at our last interview was forgiven and forgotten now. My whole being still thrilled with the mingled awe and rapture of beholding the Vision of her that had come to me for the second time. The minutes passed--and I stood by the fire like a man entranced; thinking only of her spoken words, "Remember me. Come to me;" looking only at her mystic writing, "At the... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 2515

The Two Destinies - Chapter 22. She Claims Me Again The Two Destinies - Chapter 22. She Claims Me Again

The Two Destinies - Chapter 22. She Claims Me Again
CHAPTER XXII. SHE CLAIMS ME AGAINTHE moments passed; the silence between us continued. Miss Dunross made an attempt to rouse me. "Have you decided to go back to Scotland with your friends at Lerwick?" she asked. "It is no easy matter," I replied, "to decide on leaving my friends in this house." Her head drooped lower on her bosom; her voice sunk as she answered me. "Think of your mother," she said. "The first duty you owe is your duty to her. Your long absence is a heavy trial to her--your mother is suffering." "Suffering?" I repeated. "Her letters say nothing--"... Long Stories - Post by : rahul - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 3078

The Two Destinies - Chapter 21. She Comes Between Us The Two Destinies - Chapter 21. She Comes Between Us

The Two Destinies - Chapter 21. She Comes Between Us
CHAPTER XXI. SHE COMES BETWEEN USWHAT emotion had I thoughtlessly aroused in Miss Dunross? Had I offended or distressed her? Or had I, without meaning it, forced on her inner knowledge some deeply seated feeling which she had thus far resolutely ignored? I looked back through the days of my sojourn in the house; I questioned my own feelings and impressions, on the chance that they might serve me as a means of solving the mystery of her sudden flight from the room. What effect had she produced on me? In plain truth, she had simply taken her place in my... Long Stories - Post by : patriccl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1035

The Two Destinies - Chapter 18. The Darkened Room The Two Destinies - Chapter 18. The Darkened Room

The Two Destinies - Chapter 18. The Darkened Room
CHAPTER XVIII. THE DARKENED ROOMTHE little gentleman advances to my bedside. His silky white hair flows over his shoulders; he looks at us with faded blue eyes; he bows with a sad and subdued courtesy, and says, in the simplest manner, "I bid you welcome, gentlemen, to my house." We are not content with merely thanking him; we naturally attempt to apologize for our intrusion. Our host defeats the attempt at the outset by making an apology on his own behalf. "I happened to send for my servant a minute since," he proceeds, "and I only then heard that you were... Long Stories - Post by : patriccl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1990

The Two Destinies - Chapter 17. Shetland Hospitality The Two Destinies - Chapter 17. Shetland Hospitality

The Two Destinies - Chapter 17. Shetland Hospitality
CHAPTER XVII. SHETLAND HOSPITALITY"GUIDE! Where are we?" "I can't say for certain." "Have you lost your way?" The guide looks slowly all round him, and then looks at me. That is his answer to my question. And that is enough. The lost persons are three in number. My traveling companion, myself, and the guide. We are seated on three Shetland ponies--so small in stature, that we two strangers were at first literally ashamed to get on their backs. We are surrounded by dripping white mist so dense that we become invisible to one another at a distance of half a dozen... Long Stories - Post by : patriccl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1930

The Two Destinies - Chapter 16. My Mother's Diary The Two Destinies - Chapter 16. My Mother's Diary

The Two Destinies - Chapter 16. My Mother's Diary
CHAPTER XVI. MY MOTHER'S DIARYTHERE is something repellent to me, even at this distance of time, in looking back at the dreary days, of seclusion which followed each other monotonously in my Highland home. The actions of my life, however trifling they may have been, I can find some interest in recalling: they associate me with my fellow-creatures; they connect me, in some degree, with the vigorous movement of the world. But I have no sympathy with the purely selfish pleasure which some men appear to derive from dwelling on the minute anatomy of their own feelings, under the pr essure... Long Stories - Post by : patriccl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1538

The Two Destinies - Chapter 15. The Obstacle Beats Me The Two Destinies - Chapter 15. The Obstacle Beats Me

The Two Destinies - Chapter 15. The Obstacle Beats Me
CHAPTER XV. THE OBSTACLE BEATS MEHOW long was I left alone in the carriage at the door of Mrs. Van Brandt's lodgings? Judging by my sensations, I waited half a life-time. Judging by my watch, I waited half an hour. When my mother returned to me, the hope which I had entertained of a happy result from her interview with Mrs. Van Brandt was a hope abandoned before she had opened her lips. I saw, in her face, that an obstacle which was beyond my power of removal did indeed stand between me and the dearest wish of my life. "Tell... Long Stories - Post by : jaimersteward - Date : May 2012 - Author : Wilkie Collins - Read : 1459