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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesThe Fortunes Of Nigel - GLOSSARY
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The Fortunes Of Nigel - GLOSSARY Post by :diamond2 Category :Long Stories Author :Sir Walter Scott Date :April 2012 Read :3423

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The Fortunes Of Nigel - GLOSSARY

GLOSSARY

_A,' all. BELDAM, ugly old woman.
ABYE, suffer for. BELIVE, by-and-by, presently.
ACCIDENS, grammar. BENEVOLENCES, taxes illegally
AIGRE, sour, ill-natured. exacted by the Kings of
AIN GATE, own way. England.
A' LEEVING, all living. BIDE, keep, remain.
AMBLE, a peculiar gait of a BIELDY BIT, sheltered spot.
horse, in which both legs on BIGGING, building.
one side are moved forward BILBOE, sword, rapier.
at the same time. BILLIES, brothers.
ANCE, once. BIRKIE, lively young fellow.
ANENT, concerning. BLACK-JACK, leathern drinking-
ANGEL, an ancient English gold cup.
coin, worth about 10s., and BLADES, dashing fellows, rakes.
bearing the figure of an angel. BLATE, modest, bashful.
ARRAS, tapestry. BLETHERING, foolish, silly.
AUGHT, owe. BLITHE, BLYTHE, glad.
AULD, old. BLUE-COATS, lackeys.
AULD REEKIE, Edinburgh, in BODDLE, a copper coin, value
allusion to its smoke. the sixth part of an English
AVISEMENT, counsel. penny.
AW, all. BODE, bid, offer.
AWMOUS, alms, a gift. BOOKIE, book.
BRAE, hill, hill-side. BANGED,
sprang, bounded.
BRAVE PIECE, fine thing.
BARNACLES, spectacles. BRAW, fine, handsome.
BARNS-BREAKING, idle frolics. BREAKING, kneading.
BAWBEE, halfpenny. BREEKS, breeches, trousers.
BAXTER, baker. BROCHES, kitchen spits.
BEAR-BANNOCKS, barley cakes. BROSE, pottage of mean and
BECKING, curtseying. water.
BECKS, nods. BROWNIE, domestic goblin.
BEECHEN BICKERS, dishes of BUCKET, cheat.
beechwood. BUNEMOST, uppermost.

BURROWS-TOWN, borough-town.
BUSS, kiss.

CALF-WARD, place where calves are kept in the field.
CALLAN, CALLANT, lad.
CANNILY, cautiously, skilfully.
CANNY, quiet.
CANTLE, crown of the head.
CARCANET, necklace.
CARLE, fellow.
CARLE-HEMPIE, the strongest stalk of hemp.
CARNIFEX, executioner.
CAUFF, chaff.
CAULDRIFE, chilly.
CA'T, call it.
CAUP, cup.
CAUSEY, pavement.
CERTIE, faith, in truth.
CHALMER, chamber.
CHANGE-HOUSE, roadside inn where horses are changed on a journey.
CHALK, slash.
CHAPPIT, struck.
CHEEK-BY-JOWL, CHEEK-BY-CHOWL, side by side.
CHEERY, dagger.
CHENZIE-MAIL, chain-mail.
CHIELD, fellow.
CHOPINES, high shoes or clogs.
CHUCKS, chuck-stones, as played by children.
CHUFFS, clowns, simpletons.
CLAITHING, clothing.

CLAPPED LOOFS, crossed palms.
CLATTER-TRAPS, rattle-traps.
CLAUGHT, snatched.
CLAVERING, idle talking.
CLEEK, hook.
CLEW, clue.
CLOOT, hoof.
CLOUR, blow.
CLOUTING, mending.
COCK-A-LEEKIE, COCK-A-LEEKY, leek soup in which a cock has been
boiled.
COIF, linen covering for the head.
COMPLOTS, plots, intrigues.
COMPT, list, account, particulars.
COMPTING-ROOM, counting-house.
COSHERING, being familiar and intimate.
COUP, barter.
COUP THE CRANS, go to wreck and ruin.
COUPIT, tumbled.
CRAIG, rock; also neck.
CRAP, creep.
CRAW'D SAE CROUSE, crowed so proudly.
CULLY, one easily deceived, a dupe.
CURN, grain.
CUSSER, stallion.
CUTTY-QUEAN, a loose woman.

DAFT, silly, mad.
DAIKERING, jogging or toiling along.
DANG, driven, knocked.
DEIL, devil.
DEUTEROSCOPY, a meaning beyond the original sense.
DIDNA, did not.
DIKE-LOUPER, a debauchee.
DIRDUM, uproar, tumult. DIRKED, stabbed with a dirk.
DONNERIT, stupefied.
DOOMS, very, absolutely.
DOUCE, quiet, respectable, sober.
DOVER, neither asleep nor awake.
DOWCOT, dove-cote.
DRAB, illicit sexual intercourse.
DRAFF, drains given to cows; also the wash given to pigs.
DRAFF-POKE, bag of grains.
DREDGING-BOX, a box with holes for sprinkling flour in cookery.
DROUTHY, thirsty.
DUD, rag.
DUKE OF EXETER'S DAUGHTER, a species of rack in the Tower of London.
DULE-WEEDS, mourning.
DUMMALAFONG, a common prey to all comers.
DUNTS, blows.

EARD, earth.
EEN, eyes.
ELRITCH, hideous.
ENOW, just now.
ENSAMPLE, example.
EVITED, avoided.
EXIES, hysterics.

FALCHION, a short broadsword with a slightly curved point.
FALSET, falsehood.
FAUSE, false.
FASH, trouble.
FASHIOUS, troublesome, annoying.
FENCE-LOUPER, rakish fellow.
FEBRIFUGE, a medicine to subdue a fever.
FIDUCIARY, trustee.
FLATCAPS, citizens, civilians.
FLEECHING, flattering.
FOOD FOR FAGGOTS, martyrs for their religious opinions.
FOOT-CLOTH, horse-cloth reaching almost to the ground.
FOUARTS, house-leeks.
FOULWART, pole-cat.
FRAE, from.
FRESCO, half-naked.
FULE, fool.
FULHAM, loaded dice.

GAGE, pledge, trust.
GANG A' AE GATE, go all one way.
GAR, make, force.
GARR'D, made, compelled.
GATE, way, road; also kind of.
GEAR, property.
GIFF-GAFF, give and take, tit for tat.
GIE THE GLAIKS, to befool, deceive.
GILLIE-WHITE-FOOT, running footman.
GILLRAVAGER, plunderer.
GIRNED, grinned.
GLAIKS, deception.
GLEED, awry, all wrong.
GOUD-COUK, fool.
GRAFFS, graves.
GRAMERCY, great thanks.
GRANDAM, old woman, grandmother.
GRAT, cried.
GREEN GEESE, parrots.
GREET, cry.
GREW, shudder.
GRIPS, handshakings, greetings.
GROSART, GROSSART, goose-berry.
GULL, one easily befooled,
GULLEY, large knife.
GUTTERBLOOD, one meanly bred.
GYNOCRACY, petticoat government.

HAET, thing.
HAFFITS, sides of the head.
HAFT, handle.
HAIRBOURED, resided, sojourned.
HAMESUCKEN, assaulting a man on his own premises.
HANKED, coiled.
HARLE, drag, trail.
HARMAN BECK, constable.
HEART-SCALD, disgust.
HEAD-TIRE, head-dress.
HECK AND MANGER, in comfortable quarters.
HEUGHS, glens.
HIRDIE-GIRDIE, topsy-turvy.
HIRPLING, limping, walking lame.
HIRSEL, flock.
HORSE-GRAITH, harness.
HOUGHS, hollows.
HOWFF, rendezvous, place of resort.

ILK ANE, each one.
ILL, bad.
ILL REDD-UP, very untidy.
ILL-WILLY, ill-natured.
INGINE, ingenuity.
INGOTS, masses of unwrought metal.
INGRATE, an ungrateful person.
IRON CARLES, iron figures of men.

JAW, wave.
JEDDART-STAFF, a species of battle-axe peculiar to Jedburgh.
JENNET, a small Spanish horse.
JINGLE, dance.
JOUP, dip, stoop down.

KEMPING, strife.
KENNING, knowledge.
KIMMER, gossip, neighbour.
KIRK, church.
KITTLE, ticklish, difficult, precarious.
KYTHED, seemed, appeared.

LAIGH, low.
LAIR, learning.
LAMB'S-WOOL, a beverage made of the pulp of roasted apples.
LANDLOUPER, adventurer, runagate.
LANG SYNE, long ago.
LATTEN, plated iron or brass.
LAVROCK, lark.
LEASING-MAKING, uttering treasonable language.
LEASINGS, falsehoods, treason.
LEGLIN-GIRTH, the lowest hoop on a leglin, or milk-pail.
LICK, a beating.
LIEFEST, most beloved.
LIFT, steal.
LIGHT O' LOVE, mistress, wanton woman.
LINKBOYS, juvenile torch-bearers.
LIST, like.
LITHER, soft.
LOOF, palm of the hand.
LOON, LOUN, rascal.
LOUPING, leaping.
LUG, LUGG, ear.
LUVE, love.

MAIR THAN ANCE, more than once.
MARLE, wonder, marvel.
MAGGOT, whim, fancy.
MELL, intermeddle.
MENSEFUL, modest, mannerly.
MERK, a Scottish coin, value 13s 4d.
MESS-BOOK, mass-book, Catholic prayer-book.
MICKLE, MUCKLE, much, great, large.
MINT, attempt.
MIRK, dark.
MISLEARD, unmannerly.
MORT-CLOTH, shroud.
MOTION, puppet-show.
MUCKLE v. MICKLE.
MUFFLED, disguised.
MUSKETOON, a species of musket.
MY GERTIE, my goodness! gracious!

NEB, nose, point.
NEEDSNA, need not.
NICHER, snigger.
NICKS, notches.
NIFFER, exchange.
NOBLE, a gold coin, value 6s. 8d. sterling.
NOWTE, black cattle.
NUNCHION, luncheon, food taken between meals.

OR, before.
OTHER GATE, other kind of.
OWER SICKER, too careful.

PAIK, fight, chastise.
PANGED, crammed.
PAPISTRIE, Popery.
PEASE-BOGLE, scarecrow among the pease growing.
PENNY-WEDDING, a wedding where all who attend contribute a trifle
towards the
expenses of the merrymaking.
PICKTHANK, a parasitical informer.
PIG, earthen pot, vessel, or pitcher.
PINK, stab, pierce holes into.
PLACK, a copper coin, value the third part of an English
penny.
PLOY, trick.
POCK-END, empty pocket or purse.
POCK-PUDDING, bag pudding.
POORTITH, poverty.
PORK-GRISKINS, sucking-pigs; also broiled loin of pork.
POUCH, pocket.
PRIE, taste.
PULLET, a young hen.

QUEAN, wench, young woman.

RAMPALLIONS, low women.
RAVE, tore.
RAXING, stretching.
REDDING-KAME, hair-comb.
REDD-UP, tidy, put in order.
RED WUD, stark mad.
REIRD, shouting.
REMEID, resource, remedy.
ROOPIT, croupy, hoarse.
ROSE-NOBLE, a gold coin, value 6s. 8d., impressed with a rose.
ROUT, ROWT, to roar or bellow.
RUDAS, wild, forward, bold.

SAAM, same.
SACK, sherry or canary wine, warmed and spiced.
SACKLESS, innocent.
SCAT, tribute, tax.
SCAUDING, scalding.
SCAUR, scare, frighten.
SCLATE-STANE, slate-stone.
SCRIVENER, one who draws up contracts.
SHABBLE, cutlass,
SHOON, shoes.
SHOUTHER, shoulder.
SHULE, shovel.
SIB, related.
SIBYL, prophetess.
SICKER, careful.
SICLIKE, just so.
SILLER, money, silver.
SIRRAH, sir!
SKEIGH, skittish.
SKELDER, plunder, snatch.
SLEEVELESS, thriftless.
SMAIK, mean, paltry fellow.
SNAP-HAUNCHES, firelocks.
SPANG, spring.
SPEER, ask.
SPEERINGS, information, inquiries.
SPRAIKLE, to get on with difficulty.
SPUNK, slip.
SPUNKIES, will-o'-the-wisps.
STEEKING, closing.
STEEKIT, shut.
STONERN, stone.
STOT, a bullock between two and three years old.
STRAND-SCOURING, gutter-raking.
STURDIED, afflicted with the sturdy, a sheep disease.
STYPIC, astringent, something to arrest haemorrhage.
SUCCORY-WATER, sugar water.
SUNDOWN, sunset.
SUNER, sooner.
SUMPTER HORSE, pack-horse.
SWITH, begone! be off!
SYNE, ago.

TAIT, lock.
TANE, the one.
TAWSE, leather strap used for chastisement.
TEINDS, tithes.
THROUGH-STANES, gravestones.
TIKE v. TYKE.
TINT, lost.
TITHER, the other.
TOCHER, dowry.
TOOM, empty.
TOUR, see.
TOUT, blast on the horn.
TOYS, goods.
TREEN, wooden.
TROTH, truth.
TROW, believe, guess.
TRYSTE, appointment.
TURN-BROCHE, turn-spit.
TYKE, TIKE, dog, cur.
TWA, two.
TWIRING, coquetting, making eyes at.

UMQUHILE, late, deceased.

VIVERS, victuals.

WAD, pledge.
WADNA, would not.
WADSET, mortgage.
WANION, misfortune.
WARE, spend.
WARLOCKS, wizards.
WASTRIFE, waste, extravagance.
WAUR, worse.
WEEL KEND, well known.
WHA, who.
WHEEN, few, a number of.
WHIGMALEERY, trinkets, nicknacks.
WHILK, which.
WHINGER, cutlass, long knife.
WHINYARD, sword.
WHOMBLE, upset.
WIMPLED, wrapped up.
WINNA, will not.
WITHY, gallows rope.
WOO', wool.
WYLIE-COAT, under-petticoat.
WYND, street, alley.
WYTE, blame.

YESTREEN, last night.


(The end)
Sir Walter Scott's novel: Fortunes of Nigel

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