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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesThe Dragon Of Wantley - Preface
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The Dragon Of Wantley - Preface Post by :huge63 Category :Long Stories Author :Owen Wister Date :May 2012 Read :2023

Click below to download : The Dragon Of Wantley - Preface (Format : PDF)

The Dragon Of Wantley - Preface

TO

MY ANCIENT PLAYMATES IN APPIAN
WAY CAMBRIDGE THIS LIKELY
STORY IS DEDICATED FOR REASONS
BEST KNOWN TO THEMSELVES

 


When Betsinda held the Rose
And the Ring decked Giglio's finger
Thackeray! 'twas sport to linger
With thy wise, gay-hearted prose.
Books were merry, goodness knows!
When Betsinda held the Rose.

Who but foggy drudglings doze
While Rob Gilpin toasts thy witches,
While the Ghost waylays thy breeches,
Ingoldsby? Such tales as those
Exorcised our peevish woes
When Betsinda held the Rose.

Realism, thou specious pose!
Haply it is good we met thee;
But, passed by, we'll scarce regret thee;
For we love the light that glows
Where Queen Fancy's pageant goes,
And Betsinda holds the Rose.

Shall we dare it? Then let's close
Doors to-night on things statistic,
Seek the hearth in circle mystic,
Till the conjured fire-light shows
Where Youth's bubbling Fountain flows,
And Betsinda holds the Rose.

 


PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION


We two--the author and his illustrator--did not know what we had done until the newspapers told us. But the press has explained it in the following poised and consistent criticism:

"Too many suggestions of profanity."
--_Congregationalist_, Boston, 8 Dec. '92.

"It ought to be the delight of the nursery."
--_National Tribune_, Washington, 22 Dec. '92.

"Grotesque and horrible."
--_Zion's Herald_, Boston, 21 Dec. '92.

"Some excellent moral lessons."
--_Citizen_, Brooklyn, 27 Nov. '92.

"If it has any lesson to teach, we have been unable to find it."
--_Independent_, New York, 10 Nov. '92.

"The story is a familiar one."
--_Detroit Free Press_, 28 Nov. '92.

"Refreshingly novel."
--_Cincinnati Commercial Gazette_, 17 Dec. '92.

"It is a burlesque."
--_Atlantic Monthly_, Dec. '92.

"All those who love lessons drawn from life will enjoy this
book."
--_Christian Advocate_, Cincinnati, 2 Nov. '92.

"The style of this production is difficult to define."
--_Court Journal_, London, 26 Nov. '92.

"One wonders why writer and artist should put so much
labor on a production which seems to have so little reason
for existence."
--_Herald and Presbyterian_, Cincinnati.

Now the public knows exactly what sort of book this is, and we cannot be held responsible.

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