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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesOmoo - PART II - Chapter LI. WILSON GIVES US THE CUT--DEPARTURE FOR IMEEO
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Omoo - PART II - Chapter LI. WILSON GIVES US THE CUT--DEPARTURE FOR IMEEO Post by :bellili22 Category :Long Stories Author :Herman Melville Date :February 2011 Read :3337

Click below to download : Omoo - PART II - Chapter LI. WILSON GIVES US THE CUT--DEPARTURE FOR IMEEO (Format : PDF)

Omoo - PART II - Chapter LI. WILSON GIVES US THE CUT--DEPARTURE FOR IMEEO

ABOUT three weeks after the Julia's sailing, our conditions began to
be a little precarious. We were without any regular supply of food;
the arrival of ships was growing less frequent; and, what was worse
yet, all the natives but good old Captain Bob began to tire of us.
Nor was this to be wondered at; we were obliged to live upon their
benevolence, when they had little enough for themselves. Besides, we
were sometimes driven to acts of marauding; such as kidnapping pigs,
and cooking them in the groves; at which their proprietors were by no
means pleased.

In this state of affairs, we determined to march off to the consul in
a body; and, as he had brought us to these straits, demand an
adequate maintenance.

On the point of starting, Captain Bob's men raised the most outrageous
cries, and tried to prevent us. Though hitherto we had strolled about
wherever we pleased, this grand conjunction of our whole force, upon
one particular expedition, seemed to alarm them. But we assured them
that we were not going to assault the village; and so, after a good
deal of gibberish, they permitted us to leave.

We went straight to the Pritchard residence, where the consul dwelt.
This house--to which I have before referred--is quite commodious. It
has a wide verandah, glazed windows, and other appurtenances of a
civilized mansion. Upon the lawn in front are palm-trees standing
erect here and there, like sentinels. The Consular Office, a small
building by itself, is inclosed by the same picket which fences in the
lawn.

We found the office closed; but, in the verandah of the
dwelling-house, was a lady performing a tonsorial operation on the
head of a prim-looking, elderly European, in a low, white
cravat;--the most domestic little scene I had witnessed since leaving
home. Bent upon an interview with Wilson, the sailors now deputed the
doctor to step forward as a polite inquirer after his health.

The pair stared very hard as he advanced; but no ways disconcerted, he
saluted them gravely, and inquired for the consul.

Upon being informed that he had gone down to the beach, we proceeded
in that direction; and soon met a native, who told us that, apprised
of our vicinity, Wilson was keeping out of the way. We resolved to
meet him; and passing through the village, he suddenly came walking
toward us; having apparently made up his mind that any attempt to
elude us would be useless.

"What do you want of me, you rascals?" he cried--a greeting which
provoked a retort in no measured terms. At this juncture, the natives
began to crowd round, and several foreigners strolled along. Caught
in the very act of speaking to such disreputable acquaintances,
Wilson now fidgeted, and moved rapidly toward his office; the men
following. Turning upon them incensed, he bade them be off--he would
have nothing more to say to us; and then, hurriedly addressing Captain
Bob in Tahitian, he hastened on, and never stopped till the postern
of Pritchard's wicket was closed behind him.

Our good old keeper was now highly excited, bustling about in his huge
petticoats, and conjuring us to return to the Calabooza. After a
little debate, we acquiesced.

This interview was decisive. Sensible that none of the charges brought
against us would stand, yet unwilling formally to withdraw them, the
consul now wished to get rid of us altogether; but without being
suspected of encouraging our escape. Thus only could we account for
his conduct.

Some of the party, however, with a devotion to principle truly heroic,
swore they would never leave him, happen what might. For my own part,
I began to long for a change; and as there seemed to be no getting
away in a ship, I resolved to hit upon some other expedient. But
first, I cast about for a comrade; and of course the long doctor was
chosen. We at once laid our heads together; and for the present,
resolved to disclose nothing to the rest.

A few days previous, I had fallen in with a couple of Yankee lads,
twins, who, originally deserting their ship at Tanning's Island (an
uninhabited spot, but exceedingly prolific in fruit of all kinds),
had, after a long residence there, roved about among the Society
group. They were last from Imeeo--the island immediately
adjoining--where they had been in the employ of two foreigners who had
recently started a plantation there. These persons, they said, had
charged them to send over from Papeetee, if they could, two white men
for field-labourers.

Now, all but the prospect of digging and delving suited us exactly;
but the opportunity for leaving the island was not to be slighted;
and so we held ourselves in readiness to return with the planters;
who, in a day or two, were expected to visit Papeetee in their boat.

At the interview which ensued, we were introduced to them as Peter and
Paul; and they agreed to give Peter and Paul fifteen silver dollars a
month, promising something more should we remain with them
permanently. What they wanted was men who would stay. To elude the
natives--many of whom, not exactly understanding our relations with
the consul, might arrest us, were they to see us departing--the
coming midnight was appointed for that purpose.

When the hour drew nigh, we disclosed our intention to the rest. Some
upbraided us for deserting them; others applauded, and said that, on
the first opportunity, they would follow our example. At last, we
bade them farewell. And there would now be a serene sadness in
thinking over the scene--since we never saw them again--had not all
been dashed by M'Gee's picking the doctor's pocket of a jack-knife, in
the very act of embracing him.

We stole down to the beach, where, under the shadow of a grove, the
boat was waiting. After some delay, we shipped the oars, and pulling
outside of the reef, set the sail; and with a fair wind, glided away
for Imeeo.

It was a pleasant trip. The moon was up--the air, warm--the waves,
musical--and all above was the tropical night, one purple vault hung
round with soft, trembling stars.

The channel is some five leagues wide. On one hand, you have the three
great peaks of Tahiti lording it over ranges of mountains and
valleys; and on the other, the equally romantic elevations of Imeeo,
high above which a lone peak, called by our companions, "the
Marling-pike," shot up its verdant spire.

The planters were quite sociable. They had been sea-faring men, and
this, of course, was a bond between us. To strengthen it, a flask of
wine was produced, one of several which had been procured in person
from the French admiral's steward; for whom the planters, when on a
former visit to Papeetee, had done a good turn, by introducing the
amorous Frenchman to the ladies ashore. Besides this, they had a
calabash filled with wild boar's meat, baked yams, bread-fruit, and
Tombez potatoes. Pipes and tobacco also were produced; and while
regaling ourselves, plenty of stories were told about the
neighbouring islands.

At last we heard the roar of the Imeeo reef; and gliding through a
break, floated over the expanse within, which was smooth as a young
girl's brow, and beached the boat.

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