Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesOmoo - PART I - Chapter XI. DOCTOR LONG GHOST A WAG--ONE OF HIS CAPERS
Famous Authors (View All Authors)
Omoo - PART I - Chapter XI. DOCTOR LONG GHOST A WAG--ONE OF HIS CAPERS Post by :David_C_H Category :Long Stories Author :Herman Melville Date :February 2011 Read :2042

Click below to download : Omoo - PART I - Chapter XI. DOCTOR LONG GHOST A WAG--ONE OF HIS CAPERS (Format : PDF)

Omoo - PART I - Chapter XI. DOCTOR LONG GHOST A WAG--ONE OF HIS CAPERS

GRAVE though he was at times, Doctor Long Ghost was a decided wag.

Everyone knows what lovers of fun sailors are ashore--afloat, they are
absolutely mad after it. So his pranks were duly appreciated.

The poor old black cook! Unlashing his hammock for the night, and
finding a wet log fast asleep in it; and then waking in the morning
with his woolly head tarred. Opening his coppers, and finding an old
boot boiling away as saucy as could be, and sometimes cakes of pitch
candying in his oven.

Baltimore's tribulations were indeed sore; there was no peace for him
day nor night. Poor fellow! he was altogether too good-natured. Say
what they will about easy-tempered people, it is far better, on some
accounts, to have the temper of a wolf. Whoever thought of taking
liberties with gruff Black Dan?

The most curious of the doctor's jokes, was hoisting the men aloft by
the foot or shoulder, when they fell asleep on deck during the
night-watches.

Ascending from the forecastle on one occasion, he found every soul
napping, and forthwith went about his capers. Fastening a rope's end
to each sleeper, he rove the lines through a number of blocks, and
conducted them all to the windlass; then, by heaving round cheerily,
in spite of cries and struggles, he soon had them dangling aloft in
all directions by arms and legs. Waked by the uproar, we rushed up
from below, and found the poor fellows swinging in the moonlight from
the tops and lower yard-arms, like a parcel of pirates gibbeted at
sea by a cruiser.

Connected with this sort of diversion was another prank of his. During
the night some of those on deck would come below to light a pipe, or
take a mouthful of beef and biscuit. Sometimes they fell asleep; and
being missed directly that anything was to be done, their shipmates
often amused themselves by running them aloft with a pulley dropped
down the scuttle from the fore-top.

One night, when all was perfectly still, I lay awake in the
forecastle; the lamp was burning low and thick, and swinging from its
blackened beam; and with the uniform motion of the ship, the men in
the bunks rolled slowly from side to side; the hammocks swaying in
unison.

Presently I heard a foot upon the ladder, and looking up, saw a wide
trousers' leg. Immediately, Navy Bob, a stout old Triton, stealthily
descended, and at once went to groping in the locker after something
to eat.

Supper ended, he proceeded to load his pipe. Now, for a good
comfortable smoke at sea, there never was a better place than the
Julia's forecastle at midnight. To enjoy the luxury, one wants to
fall into a kind of dreamy reverie, only known to the children of the
weed. And the very atmosphere of the place, laden as it was with the
snores of the sleepers, was inducive of this. No wonder, then, that
after a while Bob's head sunk upon his breast; presently his hat fell
off, the extinguished pipe dropped from his mouth, and the next
moment he lay out on the chest as tranquil as an infant.

Suddenly an order was heard on deck, followed by the trampling of feet
and the hauling of rigging. The yards were being braced, and soon
after the sleeper was missed: for there was a whispered conference
over the scuttle.

Directly a shadow glided across the forecastle and noiselessly
approached the unsuspecting Bob. It was one of the watch with the end
of a rope leading out of sight up the scuttle. Pausing an instant,
the sailor pressed softly the chest of his victim, sounding his
slumbers; and then hitching the cord to his ankle, returned to the
deck.

Hardly was his back turned, when a long limb was thrust from a hammock
opposite, and Doctor Long Ghost, leaping forth warily, whipped the
rope from Bob's ankle, and fastened it like lightning to a great
lumbering chest, the property of the man. who had just disappeared.

Scarcely was the thing done, when lo! with a thundering bound, the
clumsy box was torn from its fastenings, and banging from side to
side, flew toward the scuttle. Here it jammed; and thinking that Bob,
who was as strong as a windlass, was grappling a beam and trying to
cut the line, the jokers on deck strained away furiously. On a
sudden, the chest went aloft, and striking against the mast, flew
open, raining down on the heads of a party the merciless shower of
things too numerous to mention.

Of course the uproar roused all hands, and when we hurried on deck,
there was the owner of the box, looking aghast at its scattered
contents, and with one wandering hand taking the altitude of a bump
on his head.

If you like this book please share to your friends :
NEXT BOOKS

Omoo - PART I - Chapter XII. DEATH AND BURIAL OF TWO OF THE CREW Omoo - PART I - Chapter XII. DEATH AND BURIAL OF TWO OF THE CREW

Omoo - PART I - Chapter XII. DEATH AND BURIAL OF TWO OF THE CREW
THE mirthfulness which at times reigned among us was in strange andshocking contrast with the situation of some of the invalids. Thus atleast did it seem to me, though not to others.But an event occurred about this period, which, in removing by far themost pitiable cases of suffering, tended to make less grating to myfeelings the subsequent conduct of the crew.We had been at sea about twenty days, when two of the sick who hadrapidly grown worse, died one night within an hour of each other.One occupied a bunk right next to mine, and for several days had notrisen from it.
PREVIOUS BOOKS

Omoo - PART I - Chapter X. A SEA-PARLOUR DESCRIBED, WITH SOME OF ITS TENANTS Omoo - PART I - Chapter X. A SEA-PARLOUR DESCRIBED, WITH SOME OF ITS TENANTS

Omoo - PART I - Chapter X. A SEA-PARLOUR DESCRIBED, WITH SOME OF ITS TENANTS
I MIGHT as well give some idea of the place in which the doctor and Ilived together so sociably.Most persons know that a ship's forecastle embraces the forward partof the deck about the bowsprit: the same term, however, is generallybestowed upon the sailors' sleeping-quarters, which occupy a spaceimmediately beneath, and are partitioned off by a bulkhead.Planted right in the bows, or, as sailors say, in the very eyes of theship, this delightful apartment is of a triangular shape, and isgenerally fitted with two tiers of rude bunks. Those of the Juliawere in a most deplorable condition, mere wrecks, some having beentorn
NEXT 10 BOOKS | PREVIOUS 10 BOOKS | RANDOM 10 BOOKS
LEAVE A COMMENT