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Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xv Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xv

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xv
Mr. Woodhouse was soon ready for his tea; and when he had drank histea he was quite ready to go home; and it was as much as his threecompanions could do, to entertain away his notice of the latenessof the hour, before the other gentlemen appeared. Mr. Weston waschatty and convivial, and no friend to early separations of any sort;but at last the drawing-room party did receive an augmentation.Mr. Elton, in very good spirits, was one of the first to walk in.Mrs. Weston and Emma were sitting together on a sofa. He joinedthem immediately, and, with scarcely an invitation,... Long Stories - Post by : bowwow - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 2497

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xiv Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xiv

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xiv
Some change of countenance was necessary for each gentlemanas they walked into Mrs. Weston's drawing-room;--Mr. Elton mustcompose his joyous looks, and Mr. John Knightley disperse hisill-humour. Mr. Elton must smile less, and Mr. John Knightley more,to fit them for the place.--Emma only might be as nature prompted,and shew herself just as happy as she was. To her it was realenjoyment to be with the Westons. Mr. Weston was a great favourite,and there was not a creature in the world to whom she spoke withsuch unreserve, as to his wife; not any one, to whom she relatedwith such conviction of... Long Stories - Post by : mcsepro - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 2885

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xiii Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xiii

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xiii
There could hardly be a happier creature in the world than Mrs. JohnKnightley, in this short visit to Hartfield, going about every morningamong her old acquaintance with her five children, and talkingover what she had done every evening with her father and sister.She had nothing to wish otherwise, but that the days did not passso swiftly. It was a delightful visit;--perfect, in being much too short.In general their evenings were less engaged with friends thantheir mornings; but one complete dinner engagement, and outof the house too, there was no avoiding, though at Christmas.Mr. Weston would take no denial; they must... Long Stories - Post by : PKNAUSS - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 1141

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xii Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xii

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xii
Mr. Knightley was to dine with them--rather against the inclinationof Mr. Woodhouse, who did not like that any one should share with himin Isabella's first day. Emma's sense of right however had decided it;and besides the consideration of what was due to each brother,she had particular pleasure, from the circumstance of the latedisagreement between Mr. Knightley and herself, in procuring himthe proper invitation.She hoped they might now become friends again. She thought itwas time to make up. Making-up indeed would not do. She certainlyhad not been in the wrong, and he would never own that he had.Concession... Long Stories - Post by : cliffsbiz - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 677

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xi Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xi

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Xi
Mr. Elton must now be left to himself. It was no longer in Emma'spower to superintend his happiness or quicken his measures.The coming of her sister's family was so very near at hand,that first in anticipation, and then in reality, it became henceforthher prime object of interest; and during the ten days of their stayat Hartfield it was not to be expected--she did not herself expect--that any thing beyond occasional, fortuitous assistance couldbe afforded by her to the lovers. They might advance rapidlyif they would, however; they must advance somehow or other whetherthey would or no. She hardly... Long Stories - Post by : DavidLee37 - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 674

Emma - Volume I - Chapter X Emma - Volume I - Chapter X

Emma - Volume I - Chapter X
Though now the middle of December, there had yet been no weather to prevent the young ladies from tolerably regular exercise; and on the morrow, Emma had a charitable visit to pay to a poor sick family, who lived a little way out of Highbury. Their road to this detached cottage was down Vicarage Lane, a lane leading at right angles from the broad, though irregular, main street of the place; and, as may be inferred, containing the blessed abode of Mr. Elton. A few inferior dwellings were first to be passed, and then, about a quarter of a mile... Long Stories - Post by : metprezi - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 999

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Ix Emma - Volume I - Chapter Ix

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Ix
Mr. Knightley might quarrel with her, but Emma could not quarrelwith herself. He was so much displeased, that it was longer thanusual before he came to Hartfield again; and when they did meet,his grave looks shewed that she was not forgiven. She was sorry,but could not repent. On the contrary, her plans and proceedingswere more and more justified and endeared to her by the generalappearances of the next few days.The Picture, elegantly framed, came safely to hand soon afterMr. Elton's return, and being hung over the mantelpiece of the commonsitting-room, he got up to look at it, and... Long Stories - Post by : rlscott - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 1546

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Viii Emma - Volume I - Chapter Viii

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Viii
Harriet slept at Hartfield that night. For some weeks past shehad been spending more than half her time there, and graduallygetting to have a bed-room appropriated to herself; and Emmajudged it best in every respect, safest and kindest, to keep herwith them as much as possible just at present. She was obligedto go the next morning for an hour or two to Mrs. Goddard's,but it was then to be settled that she should return to Hartfield,to make a regular visit of some days.While she was gone, Mr. Knightley called, and sat some time withMr. Woodhouse and Emma, till Mr.... Long Stories - Post by : sovmark - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 1043

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Vii Emma - Volume I - Chapter Vii

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Vii
The very day of Mr. Elton's going to London produced a fresh occasionfor Emma's services towards her friend. Harriet had been at Hartfield,as usual, soon after breakfast; and, after a time, had gone hometo return again to dinner: she returned, and sooner than had beentalked of, and with an agitated, hurried look, announcing somethingextraordinary to have happened which she was longing to tell.Half a minute brought it all out. She had heard, as soon as she gotback to Mrs. Goddard's, that Mr. Martin had been there an hour before,and finding she was not at home, nor particularly expected, had... Long Stories - Post by : infobizprofit - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 843

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Vi Emma - Volume I - Chapter Vi

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Vi
Emma could not feel a doubt of having given Harriet's fancya proper direction and raised the gratitude of her young vanityto a very good purpose, for she found her decidedly more sensiblethan before of Mr. Elton's being a remarkably handsome man, with mostagreeable manners; and as she had no hesitation in following upthe assurance of his admiration by agreeable hints, she was soonpretty confident of creating as much liking on Harriet's side,as there could be any occasion for. She was quite convincedof Mr. Elton's being in the fairest way of falling in love,if not in love already. She had... Long Stories - Post by : The_Renegade - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 2308

Emma - Volume I - Chapter V Emma - Volume I - Chapter V

Emma - Volume I - Chapter V
"I do not know what your opinion may be, Mrs. Weston," said Mr. Knightley, "ofthis great intimacy between Emma and Harriet Smith, but I think it a bad thing.""A bad thing! Do you really think it a bad thing?-- why so?""I think they will neither of them do the other any good.""You surprize me! Emma must do Harriet good: and by supplying herwith a new object of interest, Harriet may be said to do Emma good.I have been seeing their intimacy with the greatest pleasure.How very differently we feel!--Not think they will do each other anygood! This will certainly be the... Long Stories - Post by : Kathie - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 2521

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Iv Emma - Volume I - Chapter Iv

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Iv
Harriet Smith's intimacy at Hartfield was soon a settled thing.Quick and decided in her ways, Emma lost no time in inviting, encouraging,and telling her to come very often; and as their acquaintance increased,so did their satisfaction in each other. As a walking companion,Emma had very early foreseen how useful she might find her.In that respect Mrs. Weston's loss had been important. Her fathernever went beyond the shrubbery two divisions of the groundsufficed him for his long walk, or his short, as the year varied;and since Mrs. Weston's marriage her exercise had been too much confined.She had ventured once... Long Stories - Post by : Sandro_Forani - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 832

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Iii Emma - Volume I - Chapter Iii

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Iii
Mr. Woodhouse was fond of society in his own way. He liked very muchto have his friends come and see him; and from various united causes,from his long residence at Hartfield, and his good nature,from his fortune, his house, and his daughter, he could command thevisits of his own little circle, in a great measure, as he liked.He had not much intercourse with any families beyond that circle;his horror of late hours, and large dinner-parties, made him unfitfor any acquaintance but such as would visit him on his own terms.Fortunately for him, Highbury, including Randalls in the same parish,and Donwell... Long Stories - Post by : PinHead_Buddy - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 1985

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Ii Emma - Volume I - Chapter Ii

Emma - Volume I - Chapter Ii
Mr. Weston was a native of Highbury, and born of a respectable family, which for the last two or three generations had been rising into gentility and property. He had received a good education, but, on succeeding early in life to a small independence, had become indisposed for any of the more homely pursuits in which his brothers were engaged, and had satisfied an active, cheerful mind and social temper by entering into the militia of his county, then embodied. Captain Weston was a general favourite; and when the chances of his military life had introduced him to Miss Churchill,... Long Stories - Post by : dereka - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 1160

Emma - Volume I - Chapter I Emma - Volume I - Chapter I

Emma - Volume I - Chapter I
Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever, and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence; and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her. She was the youngest of the two daughters of a most affectionate, indulgent father; and had, in consequence of her sister's marriage, been mistress of his house from a very early period. Her mother had died too long ago for her to have more than an indistinct remembrance of her caresses; and her place had been supplied by an excellent... Long Stories - Post by : pkahan - Date : December 2010 - Author : Jane Austen - Read : 1498