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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesLes Miserables - Volume V - BOOK FIFTH - GRANDSON AND GRANDFATHER - Chapter V. Deposit Your Money in a Forest Rather than with a Notary
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Les Miserables - Volume V - BOOK FIFTH - GRANDSON AND GRANDFATHER - Chapter V. Deposit Your Money in a Forest Rather than with a Notary Post by :cce12247 Category :Long Stories Author :Victor Hugo Date :March 2011 Read :3018

Click below to download : Les Miserables - Volume V - BOOK FIFTH - GRANDSON AND GRANDFATHER - Chapter V. Deposit Your Money in a Forest Rather than with a Notary (Format : PDF)

Les Miserables - Volume V - BOOK FIFTH - GRANDSON AND GRANDFATHER - Chapter V. Deposit Your Money in a Forest Rather than with a Notary

The reader has, no doubt, understood, without necessitating a
lengthy explanation, that Jean Valjean, after the Champmathieu affair,
had been able, thanks to his first escape of a few days' duration, to come
to Paris and to withdraw in season, from the hands of Laffitte,
the sum earned by him, under the name of Monsieur Madeleine,
at Montreuil-sur-Mer; and that fearing that he might be recaptured,--
which eventually happened--he had buried and hidden that sum in the
forest of Montfermeil, in the locality known as the Blaru-bottom.
The sum, six hundred and thirty thousand francs, all in bank-bills,
was not very bulky, and was contained in a box; only, in order
to preserve the box from dampness, he had placed it in a coffer
filled with chestnut shavings. In the same coffer he had placed his
other treasures, the Bishop's candlesticks. It will be remembered
that he had carried off the candlesticks when he made his escape
from Montreuil-sur-Mer. The man seen one evening for the first time
by Boulatruelle, was Jean Valjean. Later on, every time that Jean
Valjean needed money, he went to get it in the Blaru-bottom. Hence
the absences which we have mentioned. He had a pickaxe somewhere
in the heather, in a hiding-place known to himself alone. When he
beheld Marius convalescent, feeling that the hour was at hand, when that
money might prove of service, he had gone to get it; it was he again,
whom Boulatruelle had seen in the woods, but on this occasion, in the
morning instead of in the evening. Boulatreulle inherited his pickaxe.

The actual sum was five hundred and eighty-four thousand,
five hundred francs. Jean Valjean withdrew the five hundred
francs for himself.--"We shall see hereafter," he thought.

The difference between that sum and the six hundred and thirty
thousand francs withdrawn from Laffitte represented his expenditure
in ten years, from 1823 to 1833. The five years of his stay
in the convent had cost only five thousand francs.

Jean Valjean set the two candlesticks on the chimney-piece,
where they glittered to the great admiration of Toussaint.

Moreover, Jean Valjean knew that he was delivered from Javert.
The story had been told in his presence, and he had verified the fact
in the Moniteur, how a police inspector named Javert had been found
drowned under a boat belonging to some laundresses, between the Pont
au Change and the Pont-Neuf, and that a writing left by this man,
otherwise irreproachable and highly esteemed by his superiors,
pointed to a fit of mental aberration and a suicide.--"In fact,"
thought Jean Valjean, "since he left me at liberty, once having got me
in his power, he must have been already mad."

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Cosette and Marius beheld each other once more.What that interview was like we decline to say. There are thingswhich one must not attempt to depict; the sun is one of them.The entire family, including Basque and Nicolette, were assembledin Marius' chamber at the moment when Cosette entered it.Precisely at that moment, the grandfather was on the point of blowinghis nose; he stopped short, holding his nose in his handkerchief,and gazing over it at Cosette.She appeared on the threshold; it seemed to him that she wassurrounded by a glory."Adorable!" he exclaimed.Then he blew his nose noisily.Cosette was intoxicated, delighted, frightened, in
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