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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesLes Miserables - Volume IV - BOOK FOURTEENTH - THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR - Chapter III. Gavroche would have done better to accept Enjolras' Carbine
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Les Miserables - Volume IV - BOOK FOURTEENTH - THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR - Chapter III. Gavroche would have done better to accept Enjolras' Carbine Post by :jeremy Category :Long Stories Author :Victor Hugo Date :March 2011 Read :1437

Click below to download : Les Miserables - Volume IV - BOOK FOURTEENTH - THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR - Chapter III. Gavroche would have done better to accept Enjolras' Carbine (Format : PDF)

Les Miserables - Volume IV - BOOK FOURTEENTH - THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR - Chapter III. Gavroche would have done better to accept Enjolras' Carbine

They threw a long black shawl of Widow Hucheloup's over Father Mabeuf.
Six men made a litter of their guns; on this they laid the body,
and bore it, with bared heads, with solemn slowness, to the large
table in the tap-room.

These men, wholly absorbed in the grave and sacred task in which
they were engaged, thought no more of the perilous situation
in which they stood.

When the corpse passed near Javert, who was still impassive,
Enjolras said to the spy:--

"It will be your turn presently!"

During all this time, Little Gavroche, who alone had not quitted
his post, but had remained on guard, thought he espied some men
stealthily approaching the barricade. All at once he shouted:--

"Look out!"

Courfeyrac, Enjolras, Jean Prouvaire, Combeferre, Joly, Bahorel, Bossuet,
and all the rest ran tumultuously from the wine-shop. It was almost
too late. They saw a glistening density of bayonets undulating
above the barricade. Municipal guards of lofty stature were making
their way in, some striding over the omnibus, others through the cut,
thrusting before them the urchin, who retreated, but did not flee.

The moment was critical. It was that first, redoubtable moment
of inundation, when the stream rises to the level of the levee
and when the water begins to filter through the fissures of dike.
A second more and the barricade would have been taken.

Bahorel dashed upon the first municipal guard who was entering,
and killed him on the spot with a blow from his gun; the second
killed Bahorel with a blow from his bayonet. Another had already
overthrown Courfeyrac, who was shouting: "Follow me!" The largest
of all, a sort of colossus, marched on Gavroche with his bayonet fixed.
The urchin took in his arms Javert's immense gun, levelled it
resolutely at the giant, and fired. No discharge followed.
Javert's gun was not loaded. The municipal guard burst into a laugh
and raised his bayonet at the child.

Before the bayonet had touched Gavroche, the gun slipped from
the soldier's grasp, a bullet had struck the municipal guardsman
in the centre of the forehead, and he fell over on his back.
A second bullet struck the other guard, who had assaulted Courfeyrac
in the breast, and laid him low on the pavement.

This was the work of Marius, who had just entered the barricade.

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Les Miserables - Volume IV - BOOK FOURTEENTH - THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR - Chapter IV. The Barrel of Powder
Marius, still concealed in the turn of the Rue Mondetour, had witnessed,shuddering and irresolute, the first phase of the combat. But hehad not long been able to resist that mysterious and sovereign vertigowhich may be designated as the call of the abyss. In the presenceof the imminence of the peril, in the presence of the death ofM. Mabeuf, that melancholy enigma, in the presence of Bahorel killed,and Courfeyrac shouting: "Follow me!" of that child threatened,of his friends to succor or to avenge, all hesitation had vanished,and he had flung himself into the conflict, his two pistols in hand.
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Les Miserables - Volume IV - BOOK FOURTEENTH - THE GRANDEURS OF DESPAIR - Chapter II. The Flag: Act Second
Since they had arrived at Corinthe, and had begun the constructionof the barricade, no attention had been paid to Father Mabeuf. M. Mabeuf had not quitted the mob, however; he had enteredthe ground-floor of the wine-shop and had seated himself behindthe counter. There he had, so to speak, retreated into himself. He no longer seemed to look or to think. Courfeyrac and othershad accosted him two or three times, warning him of his peril,beseeching him to withdraw, but he did not hear them. When theywere not speaking to him, his mouth moved as though he were replyingto some
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