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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesLes Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XIII. What he believed
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Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XIII. What he believed Post by :Kathie Category :Long Stories Author :Victor Hugo Date :March 2011 Read :1576

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Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XIII. What he believed

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Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XIV. What he thought Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XIV. What he thought

Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XIV. What he thought
One last word.Since this sort of details might, particularly at the present moment,and to use an expression now in fashion, give to the Bishop of D----a certain "pantheistical" physiognomy, and induce the belief,either to his credit or discredit, that he entertained one ofthose personal philosophies which are peculiar to our century,which sometimes spring up in solitary spirits, and there take on a formand grow until they usurp the place of religion, we insist upon it,that not one of those persons who knew Monseigneur Welcome wouldhave thought himself authorized to think anything of the sort. That which enlightened this man was his
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Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XII. The Solitude of Monseigneur Welcome Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XII. The Solitude of Monseigneur Welcome

Les Miserables - Volume I - FANTINE - BOOK FIRST - A JUST MAN - Chapter XII. The Solitude of Monseigneur Welcome
A bishop is almost always surrounded by a full squadron oflittle abbes, just as a general is by a covey of young officers. This is what that charming Saint Francois de Sales calls somewhere "lespretres blancs-becs," callow priests. Every career has its aspirants,who form a train for those who have attained eminence in it. There is no power which has not its dependents. There is no fortunewhich has not its court. The seekers of the future eddy aroundthe splendid present. Every metropolis has its staff of officials. Every bishop who possesses the least influence has about himhis
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