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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesLady Susan - LETTER XXVIII - MRS. JOHNSON TO LADY SUSAN
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Lady Susan - LETTER XXVIII - MRS. JOHNSON TO LADY SUSAN Post by :Tomas_Lod Category :Long Stories Author :Jane Austen Date :February 2011 Read :1137

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Lady Susan - LETTER XXVIII - MRS. JOHNSON TO LADY SUSAN

Edward Street.


My dearest Friend,--I write in the greatest distress; the most unfortunate event has just taken place. Mr. Johnson has hit on the most effectual manner of plaguing us all. He had heard, I imagine, by some means or other, that you were soon to be in London, and immediately contrived to have such an attack of the gout as must at least delay his journey to Bath, if not wholly prevent it. I am persuaded the gout is brought on or kept off at pleasure; it was the same when I wanted to join the Hamiltons to the Lakes; and three years ago, when I had a fancy for Bath, nothing could induce him to have a gouty symptom.

I am pleased to find that my letter had so much effect on you, and that De Courcy is certainly your own. Let me hear from you as soon as you arrive, and in particular tell me what you mean to do with Mainwaring. It is impossible to say when I shall be able to come to you; my confinement must be great. It is such an abominable trick to be ill here instead of at Bath that I can scarcely command myself at all. At Bath his old aunts would have nursed him, but here it all falls upon me; and he bears pain with such patience that I have not the common excuse for losing my temper.

Yours ever,

ALICIA.

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