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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesGeorge Silverman's Explanation - FIRST Chapter
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George Silverman's Explanation - FIRST Chapter Post by :Netbiz4i Category :Long Stories Author :Charles Dickens Date :February 2011 Read :2992

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George Silverman's Explanation - FIRST Chapter

IT happened in this wise -

But, sitting with my pen in my hand looking at those words again,
without descrying any hint in them of the words that should follow,
it comes into my mind that they have an abrupt appearance. They
may serve, however, if I let them remain, to suggest how very
difficult I find it to begin to explain my explanation. An uncouth
phrase: and yet I do not see my way to a better.

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IT happened in THIS wise -But, looking at those words, and comparing them with my formeropening, I find they are the self-same words repeated. This is themore surprising to me, because I employ them in quite a newconnection. For indeed I declare that my intention was to discardthe commencement I first had in my thoughts, and to give thepreference to another of an entirely different nature, dating myexplanation from an anterior period of my life. I will make athird trial, without erasing this second failure, protesting thatit is not my design to conceal any of my infirmities, whether
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