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Full Online Book HomeLong StoriesDo And Dare: A Brave Boy's Fight For Fortune - Chapter 36. The Mine Is Sold
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Do And Dare: A Brave Boy's Fight For Fortune - Chapter 36. The Mine Is Sold Post by :Joshua_Ditty Category :Long Stories Author :Horatio Alger Date :May 2012 Read :2865

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Do And Dare: A Brave Boy's Fight For Fortune - Chapter 36. The Mine Is Sold

CHAPTER XXXVI. THE MINE IS SOLD

While his friend was in peril, where was Herbert?

For him, too, it had been an exciting day--Deer Creek had been excited by the arrival of a capitalist from New York, whose avowed errand it was to buy a mine. Reports from Deer Creek had turned his steps thither, and all the mine owners were on the qui vive to attract the attention of the monied man. It was understood that he intended to capitalize the mine, when purchased, start a company, and work it by the new and improved methods, which had replaced the older and ruder appliances at first employed.

Mr. Compton, though not a mining expert, was a shrewd man, who weighed carefully the representations that were made to him, and reserved his opinion. It was clear that he was not a man who would readily be taken in, though there were not wanting men at Deer Creek who were ready to palm off upon him poor or worthless mines. About the only mine owners who did not seek him were the owners of the Blazing Star, both of whom were on the ground. The mine was looking up. The most recent developments were the most favorable, and the prospects were excellent. They might, indeed, "peter out" as the expression is, but it did not seem likely.

"Jack," said Herbert, "shall we invite Mr. Compton to visit our mine?"

"No," answered Jack Holden; "I am willing to keep it."

"Wouldn't you sell?"

"Yes, if I could get my price."

"What is your price?"

"Twenty-five thousand dollars for the whole mine!"

"That is twelve thousand five hundred for mine," said Herbert, his cheek flushing with the excitement he felt.

"You've figured it out right, my lad," said his partner.

"That would leave me twelve thousand after I have paid up Mr. Melville for the sum I paid in the beginning."

"Right again, my lad."

"Why, Jack!" exclaimed Herbert. "Do you know what that means? It means that I should be rich--that my mother could move into a nicer house, that we could live at ease for the rest of our lives."

"Would twelve thousand dollars do all that?"

"No; but it would give me a fund that would establish me in business, and relieve me of all anxiety. Jack, it's too bright to be real."

"We may not be able to sell the mine at that figure, Herbert. Don't let us count our chickens before they are hatched, or we may be disappointed. I'm as willin' to keep the mine as to sell it."

"Jack, here is Mr. Compton coming," said Herbert.

The capitalist paused, and addressing Herbert, said:

"Have you anything to do with the mine, my lad?"

"I am half owner," answered Herbert, promptly, and not without pride.

"Who is the other half owner?"

"Mr. Holden," answered Herbert, pointing out Jack.

"May I examine the mine?"

"You are quite welcome to, sir."

Possibly the fact that this mine alone had not been pressed upon him for purchase, predisposed Mr. Compton to regard it with favor. Every facility was offered him, and Jack Holden, who thoroughly understood his business, gave him the necessary explanations.

After an hour spent in the examination, Mr. Compton came to business.

"Is the mine for sale?" he asked.

"Yes, sir."

"What is your price?"

"Twenty-five thousand dollars."

"Is that your lowest price?"

"It is."

Jack Holden wasted no words in praising the mine, and this produced a favorable impression on the capitalist with whom he was dealing.

"I'll take it," he answered.

"Then it's a bargain."

Herbert found it difficult to realize that these few words had made him a rich boy. He remained silent, but in his heart he was deeply thankful, not so much for himself, as because he knew that he was now able to rejoice his mother's heart, and relieve her from all pecuniary cares or anxieties.

"You've made a good bargain, sir, if I do say it," said Jack Holden. "For my own part, I wasn't so particular about selling the mine, but my young partner here is differently placed, and the money will come handy to him."

"You are rather young for a mine owner," said Mr. Compton, regarding Herbert with some curiosity.

"Yes, sir; I believe I am the youngest mine owner here."

"Are you a resident of this State?"

"Only temporarily, sir. I came here with a friend whose lungs are weak."

"You expect to return to the East soon?"

"Yes, sir."

"When you do, come to see me. I am a commission merchant in Boston. If it is your intention to follow a business life, I may be able to find you a place."

"Thank you, sir; I should like nothing better."

"To-morrow," said Mr. Compton, "I will come here and complete the purchase."

"Jack," said Herbert, when the new purchaser of the mine had left them, "there is no work for us here. Come with me, and let us together tell Mr. Melville the good news."

"A good thought, my lad!"

So the two mounted their horses, and left Deer Creek behind them. They little suspected how sorely they were needed.

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