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The Silent Isle - Chapter 13 The Silent Isle - Chapter 13

The Silent Isle - Chapter 13
CHAPTER XIIII have been spending some days in town, on business; I have been sitting on two committees, I have given a lecture, I have attended a public dinner; and now I have come back gratefully to my hermitage. I got home in the evening; it is winter, but unusually warm; and the birds were fluting in the bushes, as I walked round the garden in the twilight, as though they had an inkling of the Spring; to hear them gave me a sort of delicious pain, I hardly know why. They seemed to speak to me of old happy hours... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1086

The Silent Isle - Chapter 9 The Silent Isle - Chapter 9

The Silent Isle - Chapter 9
CHAPTER IXIt is Good Friday to-day. This morning I wandered through a clean, rain-washed world; among budding hedges, making for the great Cathedral towers that loom across the flat. It was noon when I passed through the little streets. Entering the great western portals, I found the huge Cathedral all lit by shafts of golden sunshine. There was a little company of worshippers under the central lantern; and a grave and dignified priest, with a tender sympathy of mien, solemnly vested, was leading the little throng through the scenes of the Passion. I sate for a long time among the congregation;... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 959

The Silent Isle - Chapter 8 The Silent Isle - Chapter 8

The Silent Isle - Chapter 8
CHAPTER VIIIReligion, as it is often taught and practised, has a dangerous tendency to become a merely mechanical and conventional thing. Worse still, it may even become a delusion, either when it is made an end in itself, or when it is regarded as a solution of all mysteries. The religious life is a vocation for some, just as the artistic life is a vocation for others, but it is not to be hoped or even desired that all should embrace and follow the religious vocation; it is just one of the paths to God, neither more nor less; and the... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 936

The Silent Isle - Chapter 7 The Silent Isle - Chapter 7

The Silent Isle - Chapter 7
CHAPTER VIIIt is an error either to glorify or degrade the body. If we worship it or pamper it, when it fails us, we are engulfed and buried in its ruins; if we misuse it, and we can misuse it alike by obeying it and disregarding it, it becomes our master and tyrant, or it fails us as an instrument. We must regard it rather as our prison, serving us for shelter and security, to be kept as fair and wholesome and cleanly as may be. When we are children, we are hardly conscious of it--or rather we are hardly conscious... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 701

The Silent Isle - Chapter 6 The Silent Isle - Chapter 6

The Silent Isle - Chapter 6
CHAPTER VIThere is one step of supreme importance from which a man must not shrink, however difficult it may seem to be; and that is to search and probe the depths of his soul, that he may find out what it is that he really and deeply and whole-heartedly and instinctively loves and admires and desires. Without this first step no progress is possible or conceivable, because whatever external revelations of God there may be, through nature, through beauty, through work, through love, there is always a direct and inner revelation from God to every individual soul; and, strange as it... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 729

The Silent Isle - Chapter 5 The Silent Isle - Chapter 5

The Silent Isle - Chapter 5
CHAPTER VHow often in sermons we are exhorted to effort! How rarely are we told precisely how to begin! How glibly it is taken for granted that we are all equally capable of it. Yet energy itself is a quality, a gift of temperament. The man who, like Sir Richard Grenville, says "Fight on," when there is nothing left to fight with or to fight for, except that indefinable thing honour, or the man who, like Sir Andrew Barton, says: "I'll but lie down and bleed awhile, And then I'll rise and... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1265

The Silent Isle - Chapter 4 The Silent Isle - Chapter 4

The Silent Isle - Chapter 4
CHAPTER IVSuch a perfect day: the sky cloudless; sunlight like pale gold or amber; soft mists in the distance; a delicate air, gently stirred, fresh, with no poisonous nip in it. I knew last night it would be fine, for the gale had blown itself out, and when I came in at sunset the chimneys and shoulders of the Hall stood out dark against the orange glow. The beloved house seemed to welcome me back, and as I came across the footpath, through the pasture, I saw in the brightly-lighted kitchen the hands of some one whose face I could not... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2665

The Silent Isle - Chapter 3 The Silent Isle - Chapter 3

The Silent Isle - Chapter 3
CHAPTER IIIPeople often talk as if human beings were crushed by sorrows and misfortunes and tragic events. It is not so! We are crushed by temperament. Just as Dr. Johnson said about writing, that no man was ever written down but by himself, so we are the victims not of circumstances but of disposition. Those who succumb to tragic events are those who, like Mrs. Gummidge, feel them more than other people. The characters that break down under brutalising influences, evil surroundings, monotonous toil, are those neurotic temperaments which under favourable circumstances would have been what is called artistic, who depend... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1494

The Household Wreck - Part 7 The Household Wreck - Part 7

The Household Wreck - Part 7
It was just striking twelve o'clock as we entered the lane where the carriage was drawn up. Rain, about the profoundest I had ever witnessed, was falling. Though near to midsummer, the night had been unusually dark to begin with, and from the increasing rain had become much more so. We could see nothing; and at first we feared that some mistake had occurred as to the station of the carriage--in which case we might have sought for it vainly through the intricate labyrinth of the streets in that quarter. I first descried it by the light of a torch, reflected... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1462

The Household Wreck - Part 6 The Household Wreck - Part 6

The Household Wreck - Part 6
To return to the narrative. Agnes had not, nor could have, the most remote suspicion of this Barratt's connection with the shop which he had not accidentally entered; and the sudden appearance of this wretch it was, at the very moment of finding herself charged with so vile and degrading an offence, that contributed most of all to rob her of her natural firmness, by suddenly revealing to her terrified heart the depth of the conspiracy which thus yawned like a gulf below her. And not only had this sudden horror, upon discovering a guilty design in what before had seemed... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3297

The Household Wreck - Part 5 The Household Wreck - Part 5

The Household Wreck - Part 5
On the 8th of April I had fallen ill, and it was now actually the 2d of June. Oh! sickening calculation! revolting register of hours! for in that same moment which brought back this one recollection, perhaps by steadying my brain, rushed back in a torrent all the other dreadful remembrances of the period, and now the more so, because, though the event was still uncertain as regarded my knowledge, it must have become dreadfully certain as regarded the facts of the case, and the happiness of all who were concerned. Alas! one little circumstance too painfully assured me that this... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3764

The Household Wreck - Part 4 The Household Wreck - Part 4

The Household Wreck - Part 4
The office, and all the purlieus of the office, were occupied by a dense crowd. That, perhaps, was always the case, more or less, at this time of day; but at present the crowd was manifestly possessed by a more than ordinary interest; and there was a unity in this possessing interest; all were talking on the same subject, the case in which Agnes had so recently appeared in some character or other; and by this time it became but too certain in the character of an accused person. Pity was the prevailing sentiment amongst the mob; but the opinions varied... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2701

The Household Wreck - Part 3 The Household Wreck - Part 3

The Household Wreck - Part 3
One o'clock had arrived; fifteen minutes after, I strolled into the garden, and began to look over the little garden-gate in expectation of every moment descrying Agnes in the distance. Half an hour passed, and for ten minutes more I was tolerably quiet. From this time till half- past two I became constantly more agitated--_agitated, perhaps, is too strong a word--but I was restless and anxious beyond what I should have chosen to acknowledge. Still I kept arguing, What is half an hour? what is an hour? A thousand things might have occurred to cause that delay, without needing to suppose... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1166

The Household Wreck - Part 2 The Household Wreck - Part 2

The Household Wreck - Part 2
On the seventeenth birthday of Agnes we were married. Oh! calendar of everlasting months--months that, like the mighty rivers, shall flow on for ever, immortal as thou, Nile, or Danube, Euphrates, or St. Lawrence! and ye, summer and winter, day and night fore do you bring round continually your signs, and seasons, and revolving hours, that still point and barb the anguish of local recollections, telling me of this and that celestial morning that never shall return, and of too blessed expectations, travelling like yourselves through a heavenly zodiac of changes, till at once and for ever they sank into the... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3185

The Household Wreck - Part 1 The Household Wreck - Part 1

The Household Wreck - Part 1
'To be weak,' we need not the great archangel's voice to tell us, '_is to be miserable_.' All weakness is suffering and humiliation, no matter for its mode or its subject. Beyond all other weakness, therefore, and by a sad prerogative, as more miserable than what is most miserable in all, that capital weakness of man which regards the _tenure of his enjoyments and his power to protect, even for a moment, the crown of flowers--flowers, at the best, how frail and few! --which sometimes settles upon his haughty brow. There is no end, there never will be an end, of... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 3095

The Spanish Nun - Part 2 The Spanish Nun - Part 2

The Spanish Nun - Part 2
From Vittoria, Kate was guided by a carrier to Valladolid. Luckily, as it seemed at first, but it made little difference in the end, here, at Valladolid, were the King and his Court. Consequently, there was plenty of regiments and plenty of regimental bands. Attracted by one of these, Catalina was quietly listening to the music, when some street ruffians, in derision of the gay colors and the form of her forest-made costume-- (rascals! one would like to have seen what sort of trousers _they would have made with no better scissors!)--began to pelt her with stones. Ah, my friends, of... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 2241

The Spanish Nun - Part 1 The Spanish Nun - Part 1

The Spanish Nun - Part 1
Why is it that _Adventures are so generally repulsive to people of meditative minds? It is for the same reason that any other want of law, that any other anarchy is repulsive. Floating passively from action to action, as helplessly as a withered leaf surrendered to the breath of winds, the human spirit (out of which comes all grandeur of human motions) is exhibited in mere _Adventures_, as either entirely laid asleep, or as acting only by lower organs that regulate the _means_, whilst the _ends are derived from alien sources, and are imperiously predetermined. It is a case of exception,... Essays - Post by : welshbeef - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas De Quincey - Read : 1451

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 5 The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 5

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 5
Turning now to the great steps in that progress which the biological sciences have made since 1837, we are met, on the threshold of our epoch, with perhaps the greatest of all--namely, the promulgation by Schwann, in 1839, of the generalisation known as the 'cell theory,' the application and extension of which by a host of subsequent investigators has revolutionised morphology, development, and physiology. Thanks to the immense series of labors thus inaugurated, the following fundamental truths have been established. (Sidenote: Fundamental truths established.) All living bodies contain substances of closely similar physical and chemical composition, which constitute the physical basis... Essays - Post by : DavidDaniels - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 2357

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 4 The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 4

The Advance Of Science In The Last Half-century - Part 4
When dealing with the doctrine of the ultimate constitution of matter, we found a certain resemblance between the oldest speculations and the newest doctrines of physical philosophers. But there is no such resemblance between the ancient and modern views of motion and its causes, except in so far as the conception of attractive and repulsive forces may be regarded as the modified descendant of the Aristotelian conception of forms. In fact, it is hardly too much to say that the essential and fundamental difference between ancient and modern physical science lies in the ascertainment of the true laws of statics and... Essays - Post by : DavidDaniels - Date : May 2012 - Author : Thomas Henry Huxley - Read : 3554

Backlog Studies - Eleventh Study Backlog Studies - Eleventh Study

Backlog Studies - Eleventh Study
It happened, or rather, to tell the truth, it was contrived,--for I have waited too long for things to turn up to have much faith in "happen," that we who have sat by this hearthstone before should all be together on Christmas eve. There was a splendid backlog of hickory just beginning to burn with a glow that promised to grow more fiery till long past midnight, which would have needed no apology in a loggers' camp,--not so much as the religion of which a lady (in a city which shall be nameless) said, "If you must have a religion, this... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1070