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Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 8 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 8

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 8
LETTER VIIIMust philosophy therefore retire from this field, disappointed in its hopes? Whilst in all other directions the dominion of forms is extended, must this the most precious of all gifts be abandoned to a formless chance? Must the contest of blind forces last eternally in the political world, and is social law never to triumph over a hating egotism? Not in the least. It is true that reason herself will never attempt directly a struggle with this brutal force which resists her arms, and she will be as far as the son of Saturn in the "Iliad" from descending into... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1646

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 7 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 7

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 7
LETTER VIICan this effect of harmony be attained by the state? That is not possible, for the state, as at present constituted, has given occasion to evil, and the state as conceived in the idea, instead of being able to establish this more perfect humanity, ought to be based upon it. Thus the researches in which I have indulged would have brought me back to the same point from which they had called me off for a time. The present age, far from offering us this form of humanity, which we have acknowledged as a necessary condition of an improvement of... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 3133

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 6 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 6

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 6
LETTER VIHave I gone too far in this portraiture of our times? I do not anticipate this stricture, but rather another--that I have proved too much by it. You will tell me that the picture I have presented resembles the humanity of our day, but it also bodies forth all nations engaged in the same degree of culture, because all, without exception, have fallen off from nature by the abuse of reason, before they can return to it through reason. But if we bestow some serious attention to the character of our times, we shall be astonished at the contrast between... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1258

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 2 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 2

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 2
LETTER IIBut I might perhaps make a better use of the opening you afford me if I were to direct your mind to a loftier theme than that of art. It would appear to be unseasonable to go in search of a code for the aesthetic world, when the moral world offers matter of so much higher interest, and when the spirit of philosophical inquiry is so stringently challenged by the circumstances of our times to occupy itself with the most perfect of all works of art--the establishment and structure of a true political freedom. It is unsatisfactory to live out... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2780

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 1 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 1

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 1
LETTER IBy your permission I lay before you, in a series of letters, the results of my researches upon beauty and art. I am keenly sensible of the importance as well as of the charm and dignity of this undertaking. I shall treat a subject which is closely connected with the better portion of our happiness and not far removed from the moral nobility of human nature. I shall plead this cause of the beautiful before a heart by which her whole power is felt and exercised, and which will take upon itself the most difficult part of my task in... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2079

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Reprinted Pieces Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Reprinted Pieces

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Reprinted Pieces
Those abuses which are supposed to belong specially to religion belong to all human institutions. They are not the sins of supernaturalism, but the sins of nature. In this respect it is interesting to observe that all the evils which our Rationalist or Protestant tradition associates with the idolatrous veneration of sacred figures arises in the merely human atmosphere of literature and history. Every extravagance of hagiology can be found in hero-worship. Every folly alleged in the worship of saints can be found in the worship of poets. There are those who are honourably and intensely opposed to the atmosphere of... Essays - Post by : Richard_Martin - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1629

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Great Expectations Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Great Expectations

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Great Expectations
_Great Expectations_, which was written in the afternoon of Dickens's life and fame, has a quality of serene irony and even sadness, which puts it quite alone among his other works. At no time could Dickens possibly be called cynical, he had too much vitality; but relatively to the other books this book is cynical; but it has the soft and gentle cynicism of old age, not the hard cynicism of youth. To be a young cynic is to be a young brute; but Dickens, who had been so perfectly romantic and sentimental in his youth, could afford to admit this... Essays - Post by : Richard_Martin - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 3211

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - A Tale Of Two Cities Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - A Tale Of Two Cities

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - A Tale Of Two Cities
As an example of Dickens's literary work, _A Tale of Two Cities is not wrongly named. It is his most typical contact with the civic ideals of Europe. All his other tales have been tales of one city. He was in spirit a Cockney; though that title has been quite unreasonably twisted to mean a cad. By the old sound and proverbial test a Cockney was a man born within the sound of Bow bells. That is, he was a man born within the immediate appeal of high civilisation and of eternal religion. Shakespeare, in the heart of his fantastic forest,... Essays - Post by : Richard_Martin - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 2723

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Little Dorrit Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Little Dorrit

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Little Dorrit
_Little Dorrit stands in Dickens's life chiefly as a signal of how far he went down the road of realism, of sadness, and of what is called modernity. True, it was by no means the best of the books of his later period; some even think it the worst. _Great Expectations is certainly the best of the later novels; some even think it the best of all the novels. Nor is it the novel most concerned with strictly recent problems; that title must be given to _Hard Times_. Nor again is it the most finely finished or well constructed of the... Essays - Post by : Richard_Martin - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1684

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Hard Times Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Hard Times

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Hard Times
I have heard that in some debating clubs there is a rule that the members may discuss anything except religion and politics. I cannot imagine what they do discuss; but it is quite evident that they have ruled out the only two subjects which are either important or amusing. The thing is a part of a certain modern tendency to avoid things because they lead to warmth; whereas, obviously, we ought, even in a social sense, to seek those things specially. The warmth of the discussion is as much a part of hospitality as the warmth of the fire. And it... Essays - Post by : baraucs - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 3361

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Child's History Of England Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Child's History Of England

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Child's History Of England
There are works of great authors manifestly inferior to their typical work which are yet necessary to their fame and their figure in the world. It is not difficult to recall examples of them. No one, for instance, would talk of Scott's _Tales of a Grandfather as indicating the power that produced _Kenilworth and _Guy Mannering_. Nevertheless, without this chance minor compilation we should not really have the key of Scott. Without this one insignificant book we should not see his significance. For the truth was that Scott loved history more than romance, because he was so constituted as to find... Essays - Post by : baraucs - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1158

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Bleak House Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Bleak House

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Bleak House
_Bleak House is not certainly Dickens's best book; but perhaps it is his best novel. Such a distinction is not a mere verbal trick; it has to be remembered rather constantly in connection with his work. This particular story represents the highest point of his intellectual maturity. Maturity does not necessarily mean perfection. It is idle to say that a mature potato is perfect; some people like new potatoes. A mature potato is not perfect, but it is a mature potato; the mind of an intelligent epicure may find it less adapted to his particular purpose; but the mind of an... Essays - Post by : baraucs - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1193

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Christmas Stories Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Christmas Stories

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Christmas Stories
The power of Dickens is shown even in the scraps of Dickens, just as the virtue of a saint is said to be shown in fragments of his property or rags from his robe. It is with such fragments that we are chiefly concerned in the _Christmas Stories_. Many of them are fragments in the literal sense; Dickens began them and then allowed some one else to carry them on; they are almost rejected notes. In all the other cases we have been considering the books that he wrote; here we have rather to consider the books that he might have... Essays - Post by : baraucs - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1152

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Martin Chuzzlewit Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Martin Chuzzlewit

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Martin Chuzzlewit
There is a certain quality or element which broods over the whole of _Martin Chuzzlewit to which it is difficult for either friends or foes to put a name. I think the reader who enjoys Dickens's other books has an impression that it is a kind of melancholy. There are grotesque figures of the most gorgeous kind; there are scenes that are farcical even by the standard of the farcical license of Dickens; there is humour both of the heaviest and of the lightest kind; there are two great comic personalities who run like a rich vein through the whole story,... Essays - Post by : petermb - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 2185

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Pictures From Italy Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Pictures From Italy

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Pictures From Italy
The _Pictures from Italy are excellent in themselves and excellent as a foil to the _American Notes_. Here we have none of that air of giving a decision like a judge or sending in a report like an inspector; here we have only glimpses, light and even fantastic glimpses, of a world that is really alien to Dickens. It is so alien that he can almost entirely enjoy it. For no man can entirely enjoy that which he loves; contentment is always unpatriotic. The difference can indeed be put with approximate perfection in one phrase. In Italy he was on a... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1922

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - American Notes Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - American Notes

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - American Notes
_American Notes was written soon after Dickens had returned from his first visit to America. That visit had, of course, been a great epoch in his life; but how much of an epoch men did not truly realise until, some time after, in the middle of a quiet story about Salisbury and a ridiculous architect, his feelings flamed out and flared up to the stars in _Martin Chuzzlewit_. The _American Notes are, however, interesting, because in them he betrays his feelings when he does not know that he is betraying them. Dickens's first visit to America was, from his own point... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 3053

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Barnaby Rudge Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Barnaby Rudge

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Barnaby Rudge
_Barnaby Rudge was written by Dickens in the spring and first flowing tide of his popularity; it came immediately after _The Old Curiosity Shop_, and only a short time after _Pickwick_. Dickens was one of those rare but often very sincere men in whom the high moment of success almost coincides with the high moment of youth. The calls upon him at this time were insistent and overwhelming; this necessarily happens at a certain stage of a successful writer's career. He was just successful enough to invite offers and not successful enough to reject them. At the beginning of his career... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 2176

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Old Curiosity Shop Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Old Curiosity Shop

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Old Curiosity Shop
Nothing is important except the fate of the soul; and literature is only redeemed from an utter triviality, surpassing that of naughts and crosses, by the fact that it describes not the world around us or the things on the retina of the eye or the enormous irrelevancy of encyclopaedias, but some condition to which the human spirit can come. All good writers express the state of their souls, even (as occurs in some cases of very good writers) if it is a state of damnation. The first thing that has to be realised about Dickens is this ultimate spiritual condition... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1645

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Oliver Twist Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Oliver Twist

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Oliver Twist
In considering Dickens, as we almost always must consider him, as a man of rich originality, we may possibly miss the forces from which he drew even his original energy. It is not well for man to be alone. We, in the modern world, are ready enough to admit that when it is applied to some problem of monasticism or of an ecstatic life. But we will not admit that our modern artistic claim to absolute originality is really a claim to absolute unsociability; a claim to absolute loneliness. The anarchist is at least as solitary as the ascetic. And the... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 2742

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Nicholas Nickleby Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Nicholas Nickleby

Appreciations And Criticisms Of The Works Of Charles Dickens - Nicholas Nickleby
Romance is perhaps the highest point of human expression, except indeed religion, to which it is closely allied. Romance resembles religion especially in this, that it is not only a simplification but a shortening of existence. Both romance and religion see everything as it were foreshortened; they see everything in an abrupt and fantastic perspective, coming to an apex. It is the whole essence of perspective that it comes to a point. Similarly, religion comes to a point--to the point. Thus religion is always insisting on the shortness of human life. But it does not insist on the shortness of human... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1320