Full Online Books
BOOK CATEGORIES
Authors Authors Short Stories Short Stories Long Stories Long Stories Funny Stories Funny Stories Love Stories Love Stories Stories For Kids Stories For Kids Poems Poems Essays Essays Nonfictions Nonfictions Plays Plays Folktales Folktales Fairy Tales Fairy Tales Fables Fables Learning Kitchen Learning Kitchen
LINKS
Valid XHTML 1.0 Transitional Free Classified Website Without Registration Free Classified Website Daniel Company
Twitter Twitter Add book
donate
Full Online Book HomeEssaysPage 6
Famous Authors (View All Authors)

George Bernard Shaw - The Philosopher George Bernard Shaw - The Philosopher

George Bernard Shaw - The Philosopher
I should suppose that _Caesar and Cleopatra marks about the turning tide of Bernard Shaw's fortune and fame. Up to this time he had known glory, but never success. He had been wondered at as something brilliant and barren, like a meteor; but no one would accept him as a sun, for the test of a sun is that it can make something grow. Practically speaking the two qualities of a modern drama are, that it should play and that it should pay. It had been proved over and over again in weighty dramatic criticisms, in careful readers' reports, that the... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 769

George Bernard Shaw - The Dramatist George Bernard Shaw - The Dramatist

George Bernard Shaw - The Dramatist
No one who was alive at the time and interested in such matters will ever forget the first acting of _Arms and the Man_. It was applauded by that indescribable element in all of us which rejoices to see the genuine thing prevail against the plausible; that element which rejoices that even its enemies are alive. Apart from the problems raised in the play, the very form of it was an attractive and forcible innovation. Classic plays which were wholly heroic, comic plays which were wholly and even heartlessly ironical, were common enough. Commonest of all in this particular time was... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 3067

George Bernard Shaw - The Critic George Bernard Shaw - The Critic

George Bernard Shaw - The Critic
It appears a point of some mystery to the present writer that Bernard Shaw should have been so long unrecognised and almost in beggary. I should have thought his talent was of the ringing and arresting sort; such as even editors and publishers would have sense enough to seize. Yet it is quite certain that he almost starved in London for many years, writing occasional columns for an advertisement or words for a picture. And it is equally certain (it is proved by twenty anecdotes, but no one who knows Shaw needs any anecdotes to prove it) that in those days... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 3183

George Bernard Shaw - The Progressive George Bernard Shaw - The Progressive

George Bernard Shaw - The Progressive
It is now partly possible to justify the Shavian method of putting the explanations before the events. I can now give a fact or two with a partial certainty at least that the reader will give to the affairs of Bernard Shaw something of the same kind of significance which they have for Bernard Shaw himself. Thus, if I had simply said that Shaw was born in Dublin the average reader might exclaim, "Ah yes--a wild Irishman, gay, emotional and untrustworthy." The wrong note would be struck at the start. I have attempted to give some idea of what being born... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1019

George Bernard Shaw - The Puritan George Bernard Shaw - The Puritan

George Bernard Shaw - The Puritan
It has been said in the first section that Bernard Shaw draws from his own nation two unquestionable qualities, a kind of intellectual chastity, and the fighting spirit. He is so much of an idealist about his ideals that he can be a ruthless realist in his methods. His soul has (in short) the virginity and the violence of Ireland. But Bernard Shaw is not merely an Irishman; he is not even a typical one. He is a certain separated and peculiar kind of Irishman, which is not easy to describe. Some Nationalist Irishmen have referred to him contemptuously as a... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 2575

George Bernard Shaw - The Irishman George Bernard Shaw - The Irishman

George Bernard Shaw - The Irishman
The English public has commonly professed, with a kind of pride, that it cannot understand Mr. Bernard Shaw. There are many reasons for it which ought to be adequately considered in such a book as this. But the first and most obvious reason is the mere statement that George Bernard Shaw was born in Dublin in 1856. At least one reason why Englishmen cannot understand Mr. Shaw is that Englishmen have never taken the trouble to understand Irishmen. They will sometimes be generous to Ireland; but never just to Ireland. They will speak to Ireland; they will speak for Ireland; but... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1370

George Bernard Shaw - The Problem of a Preface George Bernard Shaw - The Problem of a Preface

George Bernard Shaw - The Problem of a Preface
Introduction to the First EditionMost people either say that they agree with Bernard Shaw or that they do not understand him. I am the only person who understands him, and I do not agree with him. G. K. C. _The Problem of a Preface A peculiar difficulty arrests the writer of this rough study at the very start. Many people know Mr. Bernard Shaw chiefly as a man who would write a very long preface even to a very short play. And there is truth in the idea; he is indeed a very prefatory sort of person. He always gives the... Essays - Post by : Laurie - Date : May 2012 - Author : G. K. Chesterton - Read : 1076

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 27. Of The Last Symptoms The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 27. Of The Last Symptoms

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 27. Of The Last Symptoms
THIRD PART. RELATING TO CIVIL WAR MEDITATION XXVII. OF THE LAST SYMPTOMSThe author of this book has met in the world so many people possessed by a fanatic passion for a knowledge of the mean time, for watches with a second hand, and for exactness in the details of their existence, that he has considered this Meditation too necessary for the tranquillity of a great number of husbands, to be omitted. It would have been cruel to leave men, who are possessed with the passion for learning the hour of the day, without a compass whereby to estimate the last variations... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 660

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 26. Of Different Weapons The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 26. Of Different Weapons

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 26. Of Different Weapons
THIRD PART. RELATING TO CIVIL WAR MEDITATION XXVI. OF DIFFERENT WEAPONSA weapon is anything which is used for the purpose of wounding. From this point of view, some sentiments prove to be the most cruel weapons which man can employ against his fellow man. The genius of Schiller, lucid as it was comprehensive, seems to have revealed all the phenomena which certain ideas bring to light in the human organization by their keen and penetrating action. A man may be put to death by a thought. Such is the moral of those heartrending scenes, when in _The Brigands the poet shows... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1429

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 25. Of Allies The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 25. Of Allies

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 25. Of Allies
THIRD PART. RELATING TO CIVIL WAR MEDITATION XXV. OF ALLIESOf all the miseries that civil war can bring upon a country the greatest lies in the appeal which one of the contestants always ends by making to some foreign government. Unhappily we are compelled to confess that all women make this great mistake, for the lover is only the first of their soldiers. It may be a member of their family or at least a distant cousin. This Meditation, then, is intended to answer the inquiry, what assistance can each of the different powers which influence human life give to your... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 559

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 24. Principles Of Strategy The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 24. Principles Of Strategy

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 24. Principles Of Strategy
THIRD PART. RELATING TO CIVIL WAR MEDITATION XXIV. PRINCIPLES OF STRATEGYThe Archduke Charles published a very fine treatise on military under the title _Principles of Strategy in Relation to the Campaigns of 1796_. These principles seem somewhat to resemble poetic canons prepared for poems already published. In these days we are become very much more energetic, we invent rules to suit works and works to suit rules. But of what use were ancient principles of military art in presence of the impetuous genius of Napoleon? If, to-day, however, we reduce to a system the lessons taught by this great captain whose... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 961

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 23. Of Manifestoes The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 23. Of Manifestoes

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 3. Relating To Civil War - Meditation 23. Of Manifestoes
THIRD PART. RELATING TO CIVIL WAR MEDITATION XXIII. OF MANIFESTOES"Lovely as the seraphs of Klopstock, Terrible as the devils of Milton." --DIDEROT.The Preliminary precepts, by which science has been enabled at this point to put weapons into the hand of a husband, are few in number; it is not of so much importance to know whether he will be vanquished, as to examine whether he can offer any resistance in the conflict. Meanwhile, we will set up here certain beacons to light up... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3310

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 22. Of Catastrophes The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 22. Of Catastrophes

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 22. Of Catastrophes
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR MEDITATION XXII. OF CATASTROPHESThe word _Catastrophe is a term of literature which signifies the final climax of a play. To bring about a catastrophe in the drama which you are playing is a method of defence which is as easy to undertake as it is certain to succeed. In advising to employ it, we would not conceal from you its perils. The conjugal catastrophe may be compared to one of those high fevers which either carry off a predisposed subject or completely restore his health. Thus, when the catastrophe succeeds, it keeps a... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2475

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 21. The Art Of Returning Home The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 21. The Art Of Returning Home

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 21. The Art Of Returning Home
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR MEDITATION XXI. THE ART OF RETURNING HOMEFinding himself incapable of controlling the boiling transports of his anxiety, many a husband makes the mistake of coming home and rushing into the presence of his wife, with the object of triumphing over her weakness, like those bulls of Spain, which, stung by the red _banderillo_, disembowel with furious horns horses, matadors, picadors, toreadors and their attendants. But oh! to enter with a tender gentle mien, like Mascarillo, who expects a beating and becomes merry as a lark when he finds his master in a good... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1250

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 17. The Theory Of The Bed The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 17. The Theory Of The Bed

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 17. The Theory Of The Bed
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIOR MEDITATION XVII. THE THEORY OF THE BEDIt was about seven o'clock in the evening. They were seated upon the academic armchairs, which made a semi-circle round a huge hearth, on which a coal fire was burning fitfully--symbol of the burning subject of their important deliberations. It was easy to guess, on seeing the grave but earnest faces of all the members of this assembly, that they were called upon to pronounce sentence upon the life, the fortunes and the happiness of people like themselves. They had no commission excepting that of their conscience,... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1769

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 16. The Charter Of Marriage The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 16. The Charter Of Marriage

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 16. The Charter Of Marriage
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIORMEDITATION XVI. THE CHARTER OF MARRIAGE I acknowledge that I really know of but one house in Paris which is managed in accordance with the system unfolded in the two preceding Meditations. But I ought to add, also, that I have built up my system on the example of that house. The admirable fortress I allude to belonged to a young councillor of state, who was mad with love and jealousy. As soon as he learned that there existed a man who was exclusively occupied in bringing to perfection the institution of marriage in... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 2896

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 15. Of The Custom House The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 15. Of The Custom House

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 15. Of The Custom House
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIORMEDITATION XV. OF THE CUSTOM HOUSE "But no, madame, no--" "Yes, for there is such inconvenience in the arrangement." "Do you think, madame, that we wish, as at the frontier, to watch the visits of persons who cross the threshold of your apartments, or furtively leave them, in order to see whether they bring to you articles of contraband? That would not be proper; and there is nothing odious in our proceeding, any more than there is anything of a fiscal character; do not be alarmed." The Custom House of the marriage state is,... Essays - Post by : duttondl - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 819

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 14. Of Apartments The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 14. Of Apartments

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 14. Of Apartments
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIORMEDITATION XIV. OF APARTMENTS The preceding methods and systems are in a way purely moral; they share the nobility of the soul, there is nothing repulsive in them; but now we must proceed to consider precautions _a la Bartholo_. Do not give way to timidity. There is a marital courage, as there is a civil and military courage, as there is the courage of the National Guard. What is the first course of a young girl after having purchased a parrot? Is it not to fasten it up in a pretty cage, from which... Essays - Post by : mistymary43 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 861

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 13. Of Personal Measures The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 13. Of Personal Measures

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 13. Of Personal Measures
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIORMEDITATION XIII. OF PERSONAL MEASURES Perhaps the preceding Meditations will prove more likely to develop general principles of conduct, than to repel force by force. They furnish, however, the pharmacopoeia of medicine and not the practice of medicine. Now consider the personal means which nature has put into your hands for self-defence; for Providence has forgotten no one; if to the sepia (that fish of the Adriatic) has been given the black dye by which he produces a cloud in which he disappears from his enemy, you should believe that a husband has not... Essays - Post by : mistymary43 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 1593

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 12. The Hygiene Of Marriage The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 12. The Hygiene Of Marriage

The Physiology Of Marriage - Part 2. Means Of Defence, Interior And Exterior - Meditation 12. The Hygiene Of Marriage
SECOND PART. MEANS OF DEFENCE, INTERIOR AND EXTERIORMEDITATION XII. THE HYGIENE OF MARRIAGE The aim of this Meditation is to call to your attention a new method of defence, by which you may reduce the will of your new wife to a condition of utter and abject submission. This is brought about by the reaction upon her moral nature of physical changes, and the wise lowering of her physical condition by a diet skillfully controlled. This great and philosophical question of conjugal medicine will doubtless be regarded favorably by all who are gouty, are impotent, or suffer from catarrh; and by... Essays - Post by : mistymary43 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Honore De Balzac - Read : 3326