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Backlog Studies - Seventh Study Backlog Studies - Seventh Study

Backlog Studies - Seventh Study
We have been much interested in what is called the Gothic revival. We have spent I don't know how many evenings in looking over Herbert's plans for a cottage, and have been amused with his vain efforts to cover with Gothic roofs the vast number of large rooms which the Young Lady draws in her sketch of a small house. I have no doubt that the Gothic, which is capable of infinite modification, so that every house built in that style may be as different from every other house as one tree is from every other, can be adapted to our... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1936

Backlog Studies - Sixth Study Backlog Studies - Sixth Study

Backlog Studies - Sixth Study
I The King sat in the winter-house in the ninth month, and there was a fire on the hearth burning before him.... When Jehudi had read three or four leaves he cut it with the penknife. That seems to be a pleasant and home-like picture from a not very remote period,--less than twenty-five hundred years ago, and many centuries after the fall of Troy. And that was not so very long ago, for Thebes, in the splendid streets of which Homer wandered and sang to the kings when Memphis, whose ruins are older than history, was its younger rival, was twelve... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 601

Backlog Studies - Fifth Study Backlog Studies - Fifth Study

Backlog Studies - Fifth Study
I I wish I could fitly celebrate the joyousness of the New England winter. Perhaps I could if I more thoroughly believed in it. But skepticism comes in with the south wind. When that begins to blow, one feels the foundations of his belief breaking up. This is only another way of saying that it is more difficult, if it be not impossible, to freeze out orthodoxy, or any fixed notion, than it is to thaw it out; though it is a mere fancy to suppose that this is the reason why the martyrs, of all creeds, were burned at the... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 3112

Backlog Studies - Fourth Study Backlog Studies - Fourth Study

Backlog Studies - Fourth Study
It is difficult to explain the attraction which the uncanny and even the horrible have for most minds. I have seen a delicate woman half fascinated, but wholly disgusted, by one of the most unseemly of reptiles, vulgarly known as the "blowing viper" of the Alleghanies. She would look at it, and turn away with irresistible shuddering and the utmost loathing, and yet turn to look at it again and again, only to experience the same spasm of disgust. In spite of her aversion, she must have relished the sort of electric mental shock that the sight gave her. I can... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1022

Backlog Studies - Third Study Backlog Studies - Third Study

Backlog Studies - Third Study
I Herbert said, as we sat by the fire one night, that he wished he had turned his attention to writing poetry like Tennyson's. The remark was not whimsical, but satirical. Tennyson is a man of talent, who happened to strike a lucky vein, which he has worked with cleverness. The adventurer with a pickaxe in Washoe may happen upon like good fortune. The world is full of poetry as the earth is of "pay-dirt;" one only needs to know how to "strike" it. An able man can make himself almost anything that he will. It is melancholy to think how... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 978

Backlog Studies - Second Study Backlog Studies - Second Study

Backlog Studies - Second Study
I The log was white birch. The beautiful satin bark at once kindled into a soft, pure, but brilliant flame, something like that of naphtha. There is no other wood flame so rich, and it leaps up in a joyous, spiritual way, as if glad to burn for the sake of burning. Burning like a clear oil, it has none of the heaviness and fatness of the pine and the balsam. Woodsmen are at a loss to account for its intense and yet chaste flame, since the bark has no oily appearance. The heat from it is fierce, and the light... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1903

Backlog Studies - First Study Backlog Studies - First Study

Backlog Studies - First Study
I The fire on the hearth has almost gone out in New England; the hearth has gone out; the family has lost its center; age ceases to be respected; sex is only distinguished by a difference between millinery bills and tailors' bills; there is no more toast-and-cider; the young are not allowed to eat mince-pies at ten o'clock at night; half a cheese is no longer set to toast before the fire; you scarcely ever see in front of the coals a row of roasting apples, which a bright little girl, with many a dive and start, shielding her sunny face... Essays - Post by : prospertogether - Date : May 2012 - Author : Charles Dudley Warner - Read : 1081

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 27 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 27

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 27
LETTER XXVIIDo not fear for reality and truth. Even if the elevated idea of aesthetic appearance become general, it would not become so, as long as man remains so little cultivated as to abuse it; and if it became general, this would result from a culture that would prevent all abuse of it. The pursuit of independent appearance requires more power of abstraction, freedom of heart, and energy of will than man requires to shut himself up in reality; and he must have left the latter behind him if he wishes to attain to aesthetic appearance. Therefore, a man would calculate... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2370

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 26 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 26

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 26
LETTER XXVII have shown in the previous letters that it is only the aesthetic disposition of the soul that gives birth to liberty, it cannot therefore be derived from liberty nor have a moral origin. It must be a gift of nature; the favor of chance alone can break the bonds of the physical state and bring the savage to duty. The germ of the beautiful will find an equal difficulty in developing itself in countries where a severe nature forbids man to enjoy himself, and in those where a prodigal nature dispenses him from all effort; where the blunted senses... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1314

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 22 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 22

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 22
LETTER XXIIAccordingly, if the aesthetic disposition of the mind must be looked upon in one respect as nothing--that is, when we confine our view to separate and determined operations--it must be looked upon in another respect as a state of the highest reality, in as far as we attend to the absence of all limits and the sum of powers which are commonly active in it. Accordingly we cannot pronounce them, again, to be wrong who describe the aesthetic state to be the most productive in relation to knowledge and morality. They are perfectly right, for a state of mind which... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 691

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 21 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 21

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 21
LETTER XXII have remarked in the beginning of the foregoing letter that there is a twofold condition of determinableness and a twofold condition of determination. And now I can clear up this proposition. The mind can be determined--is determinable--only in as far as it is not determined; it is, however, determinable also, in as far as it is not exclusively determined; that is, if it is not confined in its determination. The former is only a want of determination--it is without limits, because it is without reality; but the latter, the aesthetic determinableness, has no limits, because it unites all reality.... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 3405

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 20 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 20

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 20
LETTER XXThat freedom is an active and not a passive principle results from its very conception; but that liberty itself should be an effect of nature (taking this word in its widest sense), and not the work of man, and therefore that it can be favored or thwarted by natural means, is the necessary consequence of that which precedes. It begins only when man is complete, and when these two fundamental impulsions have been developed. It will then be wanting whilst he is incomplete, and while one of these impulsions is excluded, and it will be re-established by all that gives... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 3493

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 19 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 19

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 19
LETTER XIXTwo principal and different states of passive and active capacity of being determined (Bestimmbarkeit) can be distinguished in man; in like manner two states of passive and active determination (Bestimmung). The explanation of this proposition leads us most readily to our end. The condition of the state of man before destination or direction is given him by the impression of the senses is an unlimited capacity of being determined. The infinite of time and space is given to his imagination for its free use; and, because nothing is settled in this kingdom of the possible, and therefore nothing is excluded... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1068

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 18 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 18

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 18
LETTER XVIIIBy beauty the sensuous man is led to form and to thought; by beauty the spiritual man is brought back to matter and restored to the world of sense. From this statement it would appear to follow that between matter and form, between passivity and activity, there must be a middle state, and that beauty plants us in this state. It actually happens that the greater part of mankind really form this conception of beauty as soon as they begin to reflect on its operations, and all experience seems to point to this conclusion. But, on the other hand, nothing... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 3095

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 17 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 17

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 17
LETTER XVIIWhile we were only engaged in deducing the universal idea of beauty from the conception of human nature in general, we had only to consider in the latter the limits established essentially in itself, and inseparable from the notion of the finite. Without attending to the contingent restrictions that human nature may undergo in the real world of phenomena, we have drawn the conception of this nature directly from reason, as a source of every necessity, and the ideal of beauty has been given us at the same time with the ideal of humanity. But now we are coming down... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1541

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 16 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 16

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 16
LETTER XVIFrom the antagonism of the two impulsions, and from the association of two opposite principles, we have seen beauty to result, of which the highest ideal must therefore be sought in the most perfect union and equilibrium possible of the reality and of the form. But this equilibrium remains always an idea that reality can never completely reach. In reality, there will always remain a preponderance of one of these elements over the other, and the highest point to which experience can reach will consist in an oscillation between two principles, when sometimes reality and at others form will have... Essays - Post by : NetStar - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 1303

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 12 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 12

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 12
LETTER XIIThis twofold labor or task, which consists in making the necessary pass into reality in us and in making out of us reality subject to the law of necessity, is urged upon us as a duty by two opposing forces, which are justly styled impulsions or instincts, because they impel us to realize their object. The first of these impulsions, which I shall call the sensuous instinct, issues from the physical existence of man, or from sensuous nature; and it is this instinct which tends to enclose him in the limits of time, and to make of him a material... Essays - Post by : linuxguy - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 863

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 11 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 11

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 11
LETTER XIIf abstraction rises to as great an elevation as possible, it arrives at two primary ideas, before which it is obliged to stop and to recognize its limits. It distinguishes in man something that continues, and something that changes incessantly. That which continues it names his person; that which changes his position, his condition. The person and the condition, I and my determinations, which we represent as one and the same thing in the necessary being, are eternally distinct in the finite being. Notwithstanding all continuance in the person, the condition changes; in spite of all change of condition the... Essays - Post by : linuxguy - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 2645

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 10 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 10

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 10
LETTER XConvinced by my preceding letters, you agree with me on this point, that man can depart from his destination by two opposite roads, that our epoch is actually moving on these two false roads, and that it has become the prey, in one case, of coarseness, and elsewhere of exhaustion and depravity. It is the beautiful that must bring it back from this twofold departure. But how can the cultivation of the fine arts remedy, at the same time, these opposite defects, and unite in itself two contradictory qualities? Can it bind nature in the savage, and set it free... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 800

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 9 Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 9

Letters On The Aesthetical Education Of Man - Letter 9
LETTER IXBut perhaps there is a vicious circle in our previous reasoning! Theoretical culture must it seems bring along with it practical culture, and yet the latter must be the condition of the former. All improvement in the political sphere must proceed from the ennobling of the character. But, subject to the influence of a social constitution still barbarous, how can character become ennobled? It would then be necessary to seek for this end an instrument that the state does not furnish, and to open sources that would have preserved themselves pure in the midst of political corruption. I have now... Essays - Post by : detect2173 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Frederich Schiller - Read : 956