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Notes On Art Notes On Art

Notes On Art
NOTES ON ART.(1) (1) Originally prefixed to a Criticism on some paintings in the Scottish Academy. "_The use of this feigned history" (the Ideal Arts of Poesy, Painting, Music, &c.) "hath been to give_ SOME SHADOW OF SATISFACTION TO THE MIND OF MAN IN THESE POINTS WHEREIN THE NATURE OF THINGS DOTH DENY IT, _the world being in proportion inferior to the soul; by reason whereof, there is, agreeable to the spirit of man_, A MORE AMPLE GREATNESS, A MORE EXACT GOODNESS AND A MORE ABSOLUTE VARIETY, _than can be found in the nature of things. So it appeareth... Essays - Post by : Edo_Rajh - Date : October 2009 - Author : John Brown - Read : 2772

Old English Poetry Old English Poetry

Old English Poetry
IT should not be doubted that at least one-third of the affection with which we regard the elder poets of Great Britain should be-attributed to what is, in itself, a thing apart from poetry-we mean to the simple love of the antique-and that, again, a third of even the proper _poetic sentiment _inspired_ _by their writings should be ascribed to a fact which, while it has strict connection with poetry in the abstract, and with the old British poems themselves, should not be looked upon as a merit appertaining to the authors of the poems. Almost every devout admirer of the... Essays - Post by : metprezi - Date : October 2009 - Author : Edgar Allan Poe - Read : 3309

Philosophy Of Furniture Philosophy Of Furniture

Philosophy Of Furniture
In the internal decoration, if not in the external architecture of their residences, the English are supreme. The Italians have but little sentiment beyond marbles and colours. In France, _meliora probant, deteriora _sequuntur - the people are too much a race of gadabouts to maintain those household proprieties of which, indeed, they have a delicate appreciation, or at least the elements of a proper sense. The Chinese and most of the eastern races have a warm but inappropriate fancy. The Scotch are _poor _decorists. The Dutch have, perhaps, an indeterminate idea that a curtain is not a cabbage. In Spain they... Essays - Post by : safelistworld - Date : October 2009 - Author : Edgar Allan Poe - Read : 1635

The Poetic Principle The Poetic Principle

The Poetic Principle
IN speaking of the Poetic Principle, I have no design to be either thorough or profound. While discussing, very much at random, the essentiality of what we call Poetry, my principal purpose will be to cite for consideration, some few of those minor English or American poems which best suit my own taste, or which, upon my own fancy, have left the most definite impression. By "minor poems" I mean, of course, poems of little length. And here, in the beginning, permit me to say a few words in regard to a somewhat peculiar principle, which, whether rightfully or wrongfully, has... Essays - Post by : flashzoe - Date : October 2009 - Author : Edgar Allan Poe - Read : 3143

The Truth Of Masks - A Note On Illusion The Truth Of Masks - A Note On Illusion

The Truth Of Masks - A Note On Illusion
In many of the somewhat violent attacks that have recently been made on that splendour of mounting which now characterises our Shakespearian revivals in England, it seems to have been tacitly assumed by the critics that Shakespeare himself was more or less indifferent to the costumes of his actors, and that, could he see Mrs. Langtry's production of Antony and Cleopatra, he would probably say that the play, and the play only, is the thing, and that everything else is leather and prunella. While, as regards any historical accuracy in dress, Lord Lytton, in an article in the Nineteenth Century,... Essays - Post by : daveb - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2236

The Critic As Artist The Critic As Artist

The Critic As Artist
THE CRITIC AS ARTIST: WITH SOME REMARKS UPON THE IMPORTANCE OF DOING NOTHINGA DIALOGUE. Part I. Persons: Gilbert and Ernest. Scene: the library of a house in Piccadilly, overlooking the Green Park.GILBERT (at the Piano). My dear Ernest, what are you laughing at?ERNEST (looking up). At a capital story that I have just come across in this volume of Reminiscences that I have found on your table.GILBERT. What is the book? Ah! I see. I have not read it yet. Is it good?ERNEST. Well, while you have been playing,... Essays - Post by : cyberlife - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 2887

Pen, Pencil, And Poison Pen, Pencil, And Poison

Pen, Pencil, And Poison
It has constantly been made a subject of reproach against artists and men of letters that they are lacking in wholeness and completeness of nature. As a rule this must necessarily be so. That very concentration of vision and intensity of purpose which is the characteristic of the artistic temperament is in itself a mode of limitation. To those who are preoccupied with the beauty of form nothing else seems of much importance. Yet there are many exceptions to this rule. Rubens served as ambassador, and Goethe as state councillor, and Milton as Latin secretary to Cromwell.... Essays - Post by : Lydia - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1384

The Decay Of Lying: An Observation The Decay Of Lying: An Observation

The Decay Of Lying: An Observation
A DIALOGUE. Persons: Cyril and Vivian. Scene: the Library of a country house in Nottinghamshire.CYRIL (coming in through the open window from the terrace). My dear Vivian, don't coop yourself up all day in the library. It is a perfectly lovely afternoon. The air is exquisite. There is a mist upon the woods, like the purple bloom upon a plum. Let us go and lie on the grass and smoke cigarettes and enjoy Nature.VIVIAN. Enjoy Nature! I am glad to say that I have entirely lost that faculty. People... Essays - Post by : billgluth - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1232

How To Make History Dates Stick How To Make History Dates Stick

How To Make History Dates Stick
These chapters are for children, and I shall try to make the words large enough to command respect. In the hope that you are listening, and that you have confidence in me, I will proceed. Dates are difficult things to acquire; and after they are acquired it is difficult to keep them in the head. But they are very valuable. They are like the cattle-pens of a ranch--they shut in the several brands of historical cattle, each within its own fence, and keep them from getting mixed together. Dates are hard to remember because they consist of... Essays - Post by : robert5500 - Date : October 2009 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1172

The Soul Of Man Under Socialism The Soul Of Man Under Socialism

The Soul Of Man Under Socialism
The chief advantage that would result from the establishment of Socialism is, undoubtedly, the fact that Socialism would relieve us from that sordid necessity of living for others which, in the present condition of things, presses so hardly upon almost everybody. In fact, scarcely anyone at all escapes.Now and then, in the course of the century, a great man of science, like Darwin; a great poet, like Keats; a fine critical spirit, like M. Renan; a supreme artist, like Flaubert, has been able to isolate himself, to keep himself out of reach of the clamorous claims of others, to stand... Essays - Post by : butch_cassidi - Date : October 2009 - Author : Oscar Wilde - Read : 1052

Kolniyatsch (1913) Kolniyatsch (1913)

Kolniyatsch (1913)
None of us who keep an eye on the heavens of European literature can forget the emotion that we felt when, but a few years since, the red star of Kolniyatsch swam into our ken. As nobody can prove that I wasn't, I claim now that I was the first to gauge the magnitude of this star and to predict the ascendant course which it has in fact triumphantly taken. That was in the days when Kolniyatsch was still alive. His recent death gives the cue for the boom. Out of that boom I, for one, will not be left. I... Essays - Post by : wliberty - Date : October 2009 - Author : Max Beerbohm - Read : 994

On The Decay Of The Art Of Lying On The Decay Of The Art Of Lying

On The Decay Of The Art Of Lying
Observe, I do not mean to suggest that the _custom_ of lying has suffered any decay or interruption--no, for the Lie, as a Virtue, A Principle, is eternal; the Lie, as a recreation, a solace, a refuge in time of need, the fourth Grace, the tenth Muse, man's best and surest friend, is immortal, and cannot perish from the earth while this club remains. My complaint simply concerns the decay of the _art_ of lying. No high-minded man, no man of right feeling, can contemplate the lumbering and slovenly lying of the present day without grieving to see a noble art... Essays - Post by : kad2866 - Date : October 2009 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1313

Mobled King (1911) Mobled King (1911)

Mobled King (1911)
Just as a memorial, just to perpetuate in one's mind the dead man in whose image and honour it has been erected, this statue is better than any that I have seen.... No, pedantic reader: I ought not to have said `than any other that I have seen' Except in shrouded and distorted outline, I have not seen this statue.Not as an image, then, can it be extolled by me. And I am bound to say that even as an honour it seems to me more than dubious. Commissioned and designed and chiselled and set up in all reverence, it yet... Essays - Post by : Redrik - Date : October 2009 - Author : Max Beerbohm - Read : 1674

How Shall I Word It? (1910) How Shall I Word It? (1910)

How Shall I Word It? (1910)
It would seem that I am one of those travellers for whom the railway bookstall does not cater. Whenever I start on a journey, I find that my choice lies between well-printed books which I have no wish to read, and well-written books which I could not read without permanent injury to my eyesight. The keeper of the bookstall, seeing me gaze vaguely along his shelves, suggests that I should take `Fen Country Fanny' or else `The Track of Blood' and have done with it. Not wishing to hurt his feelings, I refuse these works on the plea that I have... Essays - Post by : calvin_thompson - Date : October 2009 - Author : Max Beerbohm - Read : 2605

A Relic (1918) A Relic (1918)

A Relic (1918)
Yesterday I found in a cupboard an old, small, battered portmanteau which, by the initials on it, I recognised as my own property. The lock appeared to have been forced. I dimly remembered having forced it myself, with a poker, in my hot youth, after some journey in which I had lost the key; and this act of violence was probably the reason why the trunk had so long ago ceased to travel. I unstrapped it, not without dust; it exhaled the faint scent of its long closure; it contained a tweed suit of Late Victorian pattern, some bills, some letters,... Essays - Post by : cash5000 - Date : October 2009 - Author : Max Beerbohm - Read : 788

A Letter That Was Not Written (1914) A Letter That Was Not Written (1914)

A Letter That Was Not Written (1914)
One morning lately I saw in my newspaper an announcement that enraged me. It was made in the driest, most casual way, as though nobody would care a rap; and this did but whet the wrath I had in knowing that Adam Street, Adelphi, was to be undone. The Tivoli Music Hall, about to be demolished and built anew, was to have a frontage of thirty feet, if you please, in Adam Street. Why? Because the London County Council, with its fixed idea that the happiness of mankind depends on the widening of the Strand, had decreed that the Tivoli's new... Essays - Post by : Newhomebusiness - Date : October 2009 - Author : Max Beerbohm - Read : 1637

The Death Of Jean The Death Of Jean

The Death Of Jean
The death of Jean Clemens occurred early in the morning of December 24, 1909. Mr. Clemens was in great stress of mind when I first saw him, but a few hours later I found him writing steadily."I am setting it down," he said, "everything. It is a relief to me to write it. It furnishes me an excuse for thinking." At intervals during that day and the next I looked in, and usually found him writing. Then on the evening of the 26th, when he knew that Jean had been laid to rest in Elmira, he... Essays - Post by : matthewleon - Date : October 2009 - Author : Mark Twain - Read : 1039

A Plea For Captain John Brown A Plea For Captain John Brown

A Plea For Captain John Brown
I trust that you will pardon me for being here. I do not wish to force my thoughts upon you, but I feel forced myself. Little as I know of Captain Brown, I would fain do my part to correct the tone and the statements of the newspapers, and of my countrymen generally, respecting his character and actions. It costs us nothing to be just. We can at least express our sympathy with, and admiration of, him and his companions, and that is what I now propose to do.First, as to his history. I will endeavor... Essays - Post by : musomax - Date : October 2009 - Author : Henry David Thoreau - Read : 1014

Walking Walking

Walking
I wish to speak a word for Nature, for absolute freedom and wildness, as contrasted with a freedom and culture merely civil--to regard man as an inhabitant, or a part and parcel of Nature, rather than a member of society. h to make an extreme statement, if so I may make an emphatic one, for there are enough champions of civilization: the minister and the school committee and every one of you will take care of that.I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking... Essays - Post by : Al_C. - Date : October 2009 - Author : Henry David Thoreau - Read : 1217

On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience

On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience
I heartily accept the motto, "That government is best which governs least"; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe--"That government is best which governs not at all"; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which the will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to... Essays - Post by : rubyfusion - Date : October 2009 - Author : Henry David Thoreau - Read : 858