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The Home Acre - Chapter 9. The Kitchen-Garden (concluded) The Home Acre - Chapter 9. The Kitchen-Garden (concluded)

The Home Acre - Chapter 9. The Kitchen-Garden (concluded)
CHAPTER IX. THE KITCHEN-GARDEN (concluded)In the last chapter I dwelt somewhat at length on two vegetables for which thorough and enduring preparation is profitable. There is one other very early garden product which requires our attention during the first warm days of spring--rhubarb; sold in some instances under the name of "wine-plant." Wine is made from the juicy stalks, but it is an unwholesome beverage. The people call rhubarb "pie-plant;" and this term suggests its best and most common use, although when cooked as if it were a fruit, it is very grateful at a season when we begin to crave... Essays - Post by : jmilo1 - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 1789

The Home Acre - Chapter 8. The Kitchen-Garden The Home Acre - Chapter 8. The Kitchen-Garden

The Home Acre - Chapter 8. The Kitchen-Garden
CHAPTER VIII. THE KITCHEN-GARDENThe garden should be open to the sky, and as far as possible unshaded by adjacent trees from the morning and afternoon sun. It is even more essential that the trees be not so near that their voracious roots can make their way to the rich loam of the garden. Now for the soil. We should naturally suppose that that of Eden was a deep sandy loam, with not too porous a subsoil. As we have already seen again and again, such a soil appears to be the laboratory in which we can assist Nature to develop her... Essays - Post by : srinivasraju - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 1675

The Home Acre - Chapter 7. Strawberries The Home Acre - Chapter 7. Strawberries

The Home Acre - Chapter 7. Strawberries
CHAPTER VII. STRAWBERRIESThere is a very general impression that light, dry, sandy soils are the best for the strawberry. Just the reverse of this is true. In its desire for moisture it is almost an aquatic plant. Experienced horticulturists have learned to recognize this truth, which the Hon. Marshall P. Wilder has suggested in the following piquant manner: "In the first place, the strawberry's chief need is a great deal of water. In the second place, it needs more water. In the third place, I think I should give it a great deal more water." While emphasizing this truth the reader... Essays - Post by : srinivasraju - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 3064

The Home Acre - Chapter 4. The Vineyard And Orchard The Home Acre - Chapter 4. The Vineyard And Orchard

The Home Acre - Chapter 4. The Vineyard And Orchard
CHAPTER IV. THE VINEYARD AND ORCHARDHe who proposes to plant grape-vines will scarcely fail to take the sensible course of inspecting the varieties already producing fruit in his locality. From causes often too obscure to be learned with certainty, excellent kinds will prove to be well adapted to one locality, and fail in others. If, therefore, when calling on a neighbor during August, September, or October, we are shown a vine producing fruit abundantly that is suited to our taste, a vine also which manifests unmistakable vigor, we may be reasonably sure that it belongs to a variety which we should... Essays - Post by : srinivasraju - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 3257

The Home Acre - Chapter 3. The Garden The Home Acre - Chapter 3. The Garden

The Home Acre - Chapter 3. The Garden
CHAPTER III. THE GARDENWe now approach that part of the acre to which its possessor will probably give his warmest and most frequent thoughts--the garden. If properly made and conducted, it will yield a revenue which the wealth of the Indies could not purchase; for whoever bought in market the flavor of fruit and vegetables raised by one's own hands or under our own eyes? Sentiment does count. A boy is a boy; but it makes a vast difference whether he is our boy or not. A garden may soon become a part of the man himself, and he be a... Essays - Post by : srinivasraju - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 1085

The Home Acre - Chapter 2. Fruit-Trees And Grass The Home Acre - Chapter 2. Fruit-Trees And Grass

The Home Acre - Chapter 2. Fruit-Trees And Grass
CHAPTER II. FRUIT-TREES AND GRASSIt is a happy proof of our civilization that a dwelling-place, a shelter from sun and storm, does not constitute a home. Even the modest rooms of our mechanics are not furnished with useful articles merely; ornaments and pictures appear quite as indispensable. Out-of-doors the impulse to beautify is even stronger; and usually the purchaser's first effort is to make his place attractive by means of trees and shrubs that are more than useful--they are essential; because the refined tastes of men and women to-day demand them. In the first chapter I endeavored to satisfy this demand... Essays - Post by : srinivasraju - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 3791

The Home Acre - Chapter 1. Tree-Planting The Home Acre - Chapter 1. Tree-Planting

The Home Acre - Chapter 1. Tree-Planting
CHAPTER I. TREE-PLANTINGLand hunger is so general that it may be regarded as a natural craving. Artificial modes of life, it is true, can destroy it, but it is apt to reassert itself in later generations. To tens of thousands of bread-winners in cities a country home is the dream of the future, the crown and reward of their life-toil. Increasing numbers are taking what would seem to be the wiser course, and are combining rural pleasures and advantages with their business. As the questions of rapid transit are solved, the welfare of children will turn the scale more and more... Essays - Post by : srinivasraju - Date : May 2012 - Author : Edward Payson Roe - Read : 3377

The Silent Isle - Chapter 58 The Silent Isle - Chapter 58

The Silent Isle - Chapter 58
CHAPTER LVIIIOne of the most impressive passages in Wordsworth's poems describes how he rowed by night, as a boy, upon Esthwaite Lake, and experienced a sense of awestruck horror at the sight of a dark peak, travelling, as the boat moved, beyond and across the lower and nearer slopes, seeming to watch and observe the boy. Of course it may be said that such a feeling is essentially subjective, and that the peak was but obeying natural and optical laws, and had no concern whatever with the boy. That there should be any connection between the child and the bleak mountains... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 3319

The Silent Isle - Chapter 57 The Silent Isle - Chapter 57

The Silent Isle - Chapter 57
CHAPTER LVIITo-day was oppressively hot, brooding, airless; or rather, not so much without air, as that the air was thick and viscous like honey, without the thin, fine quality. One drank rather than breathed it. Yet nature revelled and rejoiced in it with an almost shameless intoxication; the trees unfolded their leaves and shook themselves out, crumpled by the belated and chilly spring. The air was full of clouds of hurrying, dizzy insects, speeding at a furious rate, on no particular errand, but merely stung with the fierce joy of life and motion. In the road crawled stout bronze-green beetles, in... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2768

The Silent Isle - Chapter 56 The Silent Isle - Chapter 56

The Silent Isle - Chapter 56
CHAPTER LVIIt was by what we clumsily call _chance but really by what I am learning to perceive to be the subtlest and prettiest surprises of the Power that walks beside us, that I found myself in Ely yesterday morning--the first real day of summer. The air was full of sunshine, like golden dust, and all the plants had taken a leap forward in the night, and were unfurling their crumpled flags as speedily as they might. I came vaguely down to the river, guided by the same good spirit, and there at the boat-wharf I found a little motor-launch lying,... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1992

The Silent Isle - Chapter 55 The Silent Isle - Chapter 55

The Silent Isle - Chapter 55
CHAPTER LVI have had a fortnight of perfect weather here--the meteorologists call it by the horrible and ugly name of "anticyclone," which suggests, even more than the word "cyclone" suggests, the strange weather said by the Psalmist to be in store for the unrighteous--"Upon the ungodly he shall rain snares, fire and brimstone, storm and tempest." I have often wondered what the fields would look like after a rain of snares! The word "cyclone" by itself suggests a ghastly whorl of high vapours, and the addition of "anti" seems to make it even more hostile. But an anticyclone in the springtime... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1906

The Silent Isle - Chapter 54 The Silent Isle - Chapter 54

The Silent Isle - Chapter 54
CHAPTER LIVThe other day I was at Peterborough, and strolled into the Close under a fine, dark, mouldering archway, to find myself in a romantic world, full of solemn dignity and immemorial peace. There in its niche stood that exquisite crumbled statue that Flaxman said summed up the grace of mediaeval art. The quiet canonical houses gave me the sense of stately and pious repose; of secluded lives, cheered by the dignity of worship and the beauty of holiness. And then presently I was in the long new street leading out into the country; the great junction with its forest of... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1163

The Silent Isle - Chapter 53 The Silent Isle - Chapter 53

The Silent Isle - Chapter 53
CHAPTER LIIII am sure that it is an inspiring as well as a pleasant thing to go on pilgrimage sometimes to the houses where interesting people and great people have lived and thought and written. It helps one to realise, that "they were mortal, too, like us," but it makes one realise it gratefully and joyfully; it is good to feel, as one comes to do by such visits, that such thoughts, such words, are not unattainable by humanity, that they can be thought in rooms and fields and gardens like our own, and written down in chairs and on tables... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 3698

The Silent Isle - Chapter 49 The Silent Isle - Chapter 49

The Silent Isle - Chapter 49
CHAPTER XLIXI have been reading all to-day the Letters of Keats, a thing which I do at irregular intervals. Perhaps what I am going to say may sound affected, but it is perfectly true: it is a book that always has a very peculiar effect on me, not so much a mental effect as what, for want of a better word, I will call a spiritual effect. It sets my soul on flame. I feel as though I had drawn near to a spirit burning like a fiery lamp, and that my own torpid and inert spirit had been kindled at... Essays - Post by : Yeraj - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1234

The Silent Isle - Chapter 48 The Silent Isle - Chapter 48

The Silent Isle - Chapter 48
CHAPTER XLVIIIIt is often said that poets have no biographies but their own works, but that is only a half-truth. It is to me one of the most delightful things in the world to follow the footsteps of a poet about, in scenes perhaps familiar to myself; to see how the simple sights of earth and sky struck fire from his mind, to realise what he thought about under commonplace conditions. I have often stayed, for instance, at Tan-yr-allt in North Wales Shelley spent some months, and where the strange adventure of the night-attack by the assassin occurred--a story never... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2220

The Silent Isle - Chapter 47 The Silent Isle - Chapter 47

The Silent Isle - Chapter 47
CHAPTER XLVIIThere can surely be few pieces of literary portraiture in the world more unpleasant than the portrait drawn of Byron in 1822 by Leigh Hunt. It gave great offence to Byron's friends, who insisted upon his noble and generous qualities, and maintained that Leigh Hunt was taking a spiteful revenge for what he conceived to be the indignity and injustice with which Byron had treated him. Leigh Hunt was undoubtedly a trying person in some ways. He did not mind dipping his hand into a friendly pocket, and he had a way of flinging himself helplessly upon the good nature... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2939

The Silent Isle - Chapter 46 The Silent Isle - Chapter 46

The Silent Isle - Chapter 46
CHAPTER XLVII have been reading all the old Shelley literature lately, Hogg and Trelawny and Medwin and Mrs. Shelley, and that terrible piece of analysis, _The Real Shelley_. Hogg's _Life of Shelley is an incomparable book; I should put it in the first class of biographies without hesitation. Of course, it is only a fragment; and much of it is frankly devoted to the sayings and doings of Hogg; it is none the worse for that. It is an intensely humorous book, in the first place. There are marvellous episodes in it, splendid extravaganzas like the story of Hogg's stay in... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 1159

The Silent Isle - Chapter 45 The Silent Isle - Chapter 45

The Silent Isle - Chapter 45
CHAPTER XLVI seem to remember having lately seen at the Zoo a strange and melancholy fowl, of a tortoise-shell complexion, glaring sullenly from a cage, with that curious look of age and toothlessness that eagles have, from the overlapping of the upper mandible of the beak above the lower; it was labelled the _Monkey-eating Eagle_. Its food lay untasted on the floor; it much preferred, no doubt, and from no fault of its own, poor thing, a nice, plump, squalling baboon to the finest of chops without the fun! But the name set me thinking, and brought to mind a very... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 3058

The Silent Isle - Chapter 44 The Silent Isle - Chapter 44

The Silent Isle - Chapter 44
CHAPTER XLIVThere has been staying with me for the last few days a perfectly delightful person; an old man--he is nearly eighty--who is exactly what an old man ought to be, and what one would desire to be if one were to grow old. Old people are not as a rule a very encouraging spectacle. One is apt to feel, after seeing old people, that it is rather a tragic thing when life outruns activity, and to hope that one may never have the misery of octogenarianism. Sometimes they are peevish and ill-at-ease, disagreeably afflicted and obviously broken; and even when... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2767

The Silent Isle - Chapter 43 The Silent Isle - Chapter 43

The Silent Isle - Chapter 43
CHAPTER XLIIIIt must have been just about a year ago to-day that I received one morning a letter from an old acquaintance of mine, Henry Gregory by name, telling me that he was staying in my neighbourhood--might he come over to see me? I asked him to come to luncheon. I do not remember how I first came to know Gregory, but I was instrumental in once getting him a little legal work to do, since when he has shown a dangerous disposition to require similar services of me, and even to confide in me. I am quite incapable--not on principle,... Essays - Post by : eggibiz - Date : May 2012 - Author : Arthur C. Benson - Read : 2348