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A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 12. Which Contains A Surprise For Mrs. Holt A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 12. Which Contains A Surprise For Mrs. Holt

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 12. Which Contains A Surprise For Mrs. Holt
BOOK I CHAPTER XII. WHICH CONTAINS A SURPRISE FOR MRS. HOLTHow long she sat gazing with unseeing eyes down the valley Honora did not know. Distant mutterings of thunder aroused her; the evening sky had darkened, and angry-looking clouds of purple were gathering over the hills. She rose and hurried homeward. She had thought to enter by the billiard-room door, and so gain her own chamber without encountering the household; but she had reckoned without her hostess. Beyond the billiard room, in the little entry filled with potted plants, she came face to face with that lady, who was inciting a... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 3245

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 11. What Might Have Been A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 11. What Might Have Been

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 11. What Might Have Been
BOOK I CHAPTER XI. WHAT MIGHT HAVE BEENHonora sat still upon the bench. After an indefinite period she saw through the trees a vehicle on the driveway, and in it a single passenger. And suddenly it occurred to her that the passenger must be Peter, for Mrs. Holt had announced her intention of sending for him. She arose and approached the house, not without a sense of agitation. She halted a moment at a little distance from the porch he was talking with Howard Spence and Joshua, and the fact that he was an unchanged Peter came to her with... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1636

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 10. In Which Honora Widens Her Horizon A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 10. In Which Honora Widens Her Horizon

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 10. In Which Honora Widens Her Horizon
BOOK I CHAPTER X. IN WHICH HONORA WIDENS HER HORIZONIf it were not a digression, it might be interesting to speculate upon the reason why, in view of their expressed opinions of Silverdale, both the Vicomte and Mr. Spence remained during the week that followed. Robert, who went off in the middle of it with his family to the seashore, described it to Honora as a normal week. During its progress there came and went a missionary from China, a pianist, an English lady who had heard of the Institution, a Southern spinster with literary gifts, a youthful architect who had... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 2368

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 9. In Which The Vicomte Continues His Studies A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 9. In Which The Vicomte Continues His Studies

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 9. In Which The Vicomte Continues His Studies
BOOK I CHAPTER IX. IN WHICH THE VICOMTE CONTINUES HIS STUDIESMr. Robert Holt, Honora learned at breakfast, had two bobbies. She had never heard of what is called Forestry, and had always believed the wood of her country to be inexhaustible. It had never occurred to her to think of a wild forest as an example of nature's extravagance, and so flattering was her attention while Robert explained the primary principles of caring for trees that he actually offered to show her one of the tracts on the estate which he was treating. He could not,--he regretted to say, take her... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 2142

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 8. A Chapter Of Conquests A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 8. A Chapter Of Conquests

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 8. A Chapter Of Conquests
BOOK I CHAPTER VIII. A CHAPTER OF CONQUESTSHonora's interest in the Institution was so lively, and she asked so many questions and praised so highly the work with which the indiscreet young women were occupied that Mrs. Holt patted her hand as they drove homeward. "My dear," she said, "I begin to wish I'd adopted you myself. Perhaps, later on, we can find a husband for you, and you will marry and settle down near us here at Silverdale, and then you can help me with the work." "Oh, Mrs. Holt," she replied, "I should so like to help you, I... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 2930

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 7. The Olympian Order A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 7. The Olympian Order

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 7. The Olympian Order
BOOK I CHAPTER VII. THE OLYMPIAN ORDERLying back in the chair of the Pullman and gazing over the wide Hudson shining in the afternoon sun, Honora's imagination ran riot until the seeming possibilities of life became infinite. At every click of the rails she was drawing nearer to that great world of which she had dreamed, a world of country houses inhabited by an Olympian order. To be sure, Susan, who sat reading in the chair behind her, was but a humble representative of that order--but Providence sometimes makes use of such instruments. The picture of the tall and brilliant Ethel... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 2783

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 3. Concerning Providence A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 3. Concerning Providence

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 3. Concerning Providence
BOOK I CHAPTER III. CONCERNING PROVIDENCEWhat quality was it in Honora that compelled Bridget to stop her ironing on Tuesdays in order to make hot waffles for a young woman who was late to breakfast? Bridget, who would have filled the kitchen with righteous wrath if Aunt Mary had transgressed the rules of the house, which were like the laws of the Medes and Persians! And in Honora's early youth Mary Ann, the housemaid, spent more than one painful evening writing home for cockle shells and other articles to propitiate our princess, who rewarded her with a winning smile and a... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1201

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 2. Perdita Recalled A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 2. Perdita Recalled

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 2. Perdita Recalled
BOOK I CHAPTER II. PERDITA RECALLEDSaint Louis, or that part of it which is called by dealers in real estate the choice residence section, grew westward. And Uncle Tom might be said to have been in the vanguard of the movement. In the days before Honora was born he had built his little house on what had been a farm on the Olive Street Road, at the crest of the second ridge from the river. Up this ridge, with clanking traces, toiled the horse-cars that carried Uncle Tom downtown to the bank and Aunt Mary to market. Fleeing westward, likewise, from... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1501

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 1. What's In Heredity A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 1. What's In Heredity

A Modern Chronicle - Book 1 - Chapter 1. What's In Heredity
BOOK I CHAPTER I. WHAT'S IN HEREDITYHonora Leffingwell is the original name of our heroine. She was born in the last quarter of the Nineteenth Century, at Nice, in France, and she spent the early years of her life in St. Louis, a somewhat conservative old city on the banks of the Mississippi River. Her father was Randolph Leffingwell, and he died in the early flower of his manhood, while filling with a grace that many remember the post of United States Consul at Nice. As a linguist he was a phenomenon, and his photograph in the tortoise-shell frame proves indubitably,... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1945

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 30. P.S. Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 30. P.S.

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 30. P.S.
BOOK III CHAPTER XXX. P.S.By request of one who has read thus far, and is still curious. Yes, and another who, in spite of himself, has fallen in love with Victoria and would like to linger a while longer, even though it were with the paltry excuse of discussing that world-old question of hers--Can sublime happiness and achievement go together? Novels on the problem of sex nowadays often begin with marriages, but rarely discuss the happy ones; and many a woman is forced to sit wistfully at home while her companion soars.... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1074

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 29. The Vale Of The Blue Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 29. The Vale Of The Blue

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 29. The Vale Of The Blue
BOOK III CHAPTER XXIX. THE VALE OF THE BLUEAusten himself could not well have defined his mental state as he made his way through the big rooms towards the door, but he was aware of one main desire--to escape from Fairview. With the odours of the flowers in the tall silver vases on the piano--her piano!--the spirit of desire which had so long possessed him, waking and sleeping, returned,--returned to torture him now with greater skill amidst these her possessions; her volume of Chopin on the rack, bound in red leather and stamped with her initials, which compelled his glance as... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 3193

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 28. The Voice Of An Era Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 28. The Voice Of An Era

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 28. The Voice Of An Era
BOOK III CHAPTER XXVIII. THE VOICE OF AN ERAThey took him home, in the stateroom of the sleeper attached to the night express from the south, although Mr. Flint, by telephone, had put a special train at his disposal. The long service of Hilary Vane was over; he had won his last fight for the man he had chosen to call his master; and those who had fought behind him, whose places, whose very luminary existences, had depended on his skill, knew that the end had come; nay, were already speculating, manoeuvring, and taking sides. Who would be the new Captain-general?... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1583

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 27. The Arena And The Dust Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 27. The Arena And The Dust

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 27. The Arena And The Dust
BOOK III CHAPTER XXVII. THE ARENA AND THE DUSTAlas! that the great genius who described the battle of Waterloo is not alive to-day and on this side of the Atlantic, for a subject worthy of his pen is at hand,--nothing less than that convention of conventions at which the Honourable Humphrey Crewe of Leith is one of the candidates. One of the candidates, indeed! Will it not be known, as long as there are pensions, and a governor and a state-house and a seal and State sovereignty and a staff, as the Crewe Convention? How charge after charge was made during... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 3552

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 23. A Falling-Out In High Places Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 23. A Falling-Out In High Places

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 23. A Falling-Out In High Places
BOOK III CHAPTER XXIII. A FALLING-OUT IN HIGH PLACESAlthough one of the most exciting political battles ever fought is fast coming to its climax, and a now jubilant Mr. Crewe is contesting every foot of ground in the State with the determination and pertinacity which make him a marked man; although the convention wherein his fate will be decided is now but a few days distant, and everything has been done to secure a victory which mortal man can do, let us follow Hilary Vane to Fairview. Not that Hilary has been idle. The "Book of Arguments" is exhausted, and the... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 908

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 22. In Which Euphrasia Takes A Hand Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 22. In Which Euphrasia Takes A Hand

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 22. In Which Euphrasia Takes A Hand
BOOK III CHAPTER XXII. IN WHICH EUPHRASIA TAKES A HANDAusten had not forgotten his promise to Euphrasia, and he had gone to Hanover Street many times since his sojourn at Mr. Jabe Jenney's. Usually these visits had taken place in the middle of the day, when Euphrasia, with gentle but determined insistence, had made him sit down before some morsel which she had prepared against his coming, and which he had not the heart to refuse. In answer to his inquiries about Hilary, she would toss her head and reply, disdainfully, that he was as comfortable as he should be. For... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 3108

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 21. St. Giles Of The Blameless Life Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 21. St. Giles Of The Blameless Life

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 3 - Chapter 21. St. Giles Of The Blameless Life
BOOK III CHAPTER XXI. ST. GILES OF THE BLAMELESS LIFEThe burden of the valley of vision: woe to the Honourable Adam B. Hunt! Where is he all this time? On the porch of his home in Edmundton, smoking cigars, little heeding the rising of the waters; receiving visits from the Honourables Brush Bascom, Nat Billings, and Jacob Botcher, and signing cheques to the order of these gentlemen for necessary expenses. Be it known that the Honourable Adam was a man of substance in this world's goods. To quote from Mr. Crewe's speech at Hull: "The Northeastern Railroads confer--they do not pay,... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 2802

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 20. Mr. Crewe: An Appreciation Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 20. Mr. Crewe: An Appreciation

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 20. Mr. Crewe: An Appreciation
BOOK II CHAPTER XX. MR. CREWE: AN APPRECIATION (1)It is given to some rare mortals--with whom fame precedes grey hairs or baldness to read, while still on the rising tide of their efforts, that portion of their lives which has already been inscribed on the scroll of history--or something like it. Mr. Crewe in kilts at five; and (prophetic picture!) with a train of cars which--so the family tradition runs--was afterwards demolished; Mr. Crewe at fourteen, in delicate health; this picture was taken abroad, with a long-suffering tutor who could speak feelingly, if he would, of embryo geniuses. Even at this... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 3060

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 19. Mr. Jabe Jenney Entertains Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 19. Mr. Jabe Jenney Entertains

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 19. Mr. Jabe Jenney Entertains
BOOK II CHAPTER XIX. MR. JABE JENNEY ENTERTAINSMr. Flint had dropped the subject with his last remark, nor had Victoria attempted to pursue it. Bewildered and not a little depressed (a new experience for her), she had tried to hide her feelings. He, too, was harassed and tired, and she had drawn him away from the bench and through the pine woods to the pastures to look at his cattle and the model barn he was building for them. At half-past three, in her runabout, she had driven him to the East Tunbridge station he had taken the train for... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1365

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 18. A Spirit In The Woods Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 18. A Spirit In The Woods

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 18. A Spirit In The Woods
BOOK II CHAPTER XVIII. A SPIRIT IN THE WOODSEmpires crack before they crumble, and the first cracks seem easily mended--even as they have been mended before. A revolt in Gaul or Britain or Thrace is little to be minded, and a prophet in Judea less. And yet into him who sits in the seat of power a premonition of something impending gradually creeps--a premonition which he will not acknowledge, will not define. Yesterday, by the pointing of a finger, he created a province; to-day he dares not, but consoles himself by saying he does not wish to point. No antagonist worthy... Long Stories - Post by : nexus - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 1039

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 17. Busy Days At Wedderburn Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 17. Busy Days At Wedderburn

Mr. Crewe's Career - Book 2 - Chapter 17. Busy Days At Wedderburn
BOOK II CHAPTER XVII. BUSY DAYS AT WEDDERBURNThere is no blast so powerful, so withering, as the blast of ridicule. Only the strongest men can withstand it, only reformers who are such in deed, and not alone in name, can snap their fingers at it, and liken it to the crackling of thorns under a pot. Confucius and Martin Luther must have been ridiculed, Mr. Crewe reflected, and although he did not have time to assure himself on these historical points, the thought stayed him. Sixty odd weekly newspapers, filled with arguments from the Book, attacked him all at once; and... Long Stories - Post by : driverx - Date : May 2012 - Author : Winston Churchill - Read : 2745